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The Ivy League is a collegiate athletic conference comprising sports teams from eight private institutions of higher education in the Northeastern United States. The conference name is also commonly used to refer to those eight schools as a group. The eight institutions are Brown University, Columbia University, Cornell University, Dartmouth College, Harvard University, Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and Yale University. The term Ivy League has connotations of academic excellence, selectivity in admissions, and social elitism.

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The term became official after the formation of the NCAA Division I athletic conference in 1954. The use of the phrase is no longer limited to athletics, and now represents an educational philosophy inherent to the nation's oldest schools. Seven of the eight schools were founded during the United States colonial period; the exception is Cornell, which was founded in 1865. Ivy League institutions account for seven of the nine Colonial Colleges chartered before the…

…American Revolution.
Ivy League schools are viewed as some of the most prestigious, and are ranked among the best universities worldwide. All eight universities place in the top twenty of the U.S. News & World Report 2014 university rankings, including the top four schools and six of the top ten. Each school receives millions of dollars in research grants and other subsidies from federal and state government.
Undergraduate enrollments range from about 4,000 to 14,000, making them larger than those of a typical private liberal arts college and smaller than a typical public state university. Total enrollments, including graduate students, range from approximately 6,100 at Dartmouth to over 20,000 at Columbia, Cornell, Harvard, and Penn. Ivy League financial endowments range from Brown's $2.7 billion to Harvard's $32.3 billion, the largest financial endowment of any academic institution in the world.

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      Patriot League The Patriot League is a collegiate athletic conference comprising private institutions of higher education and two…
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      The Patriot League is a collegiate athletic conference comprising private institutions of higher education and two United States service academies based in the Northeastern United States. Outside of the Ivy League, it is the most selective group of higher education institutions in NCAA Division I and has the highest student-athlete graduation rate for both the NCAA graduation success rate and the federal graduation rate.…

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      The Patriot League is a collegiate athletic conference comprising private institutions of higher education and two United States service academies based in the Northeastern United States. Outside of the Ivy League, it is the most selective group of higher education institutions in NCAA Division I and has the highest student-athlete graduation rate for both the NCAA graduation success rate and the federal graduation rate.
      The Patriot League consists of 10 core members: American University, the United States Military Academy (Army), Boston University, Bucknell University, Colgate University, College of the Holy Cross, Lafayette College, Lehigh University, Loyola University Maryland and the United States Naval Academy (Navy).
      All 10 core members participate in the NCAA's Division I for all Patriot League sports that they offer. Since not all schools sponsor every available NCAA sport, such as ice hockey and wrestling, most schools are affiliated with other collegiate conferences. Additionally, the Patriot League has a unique arrangement for football. Army and Navy are Independents in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), while Bucknell, Colgate, Holy Cross, Lafayette, and Lehigh are members of the Patriot League’s Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) conference. American, Boston University and Loyola Maryland do not sponsor football.
      Three other private institutions are Patriot League members only for specific sports and are referred to as 'Patriot League associate members.' Fordham University and Georgetown University are associate members in football, while MIT is an associate member in women’s rowing.

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    Connects To Patriot League

    • Ivy League teams' non-league games are often against the members of the Patriot League, which have similar academic standards and athletic scholarship policies. from Ivy League

    • The policy was in step with the Ivy League's policy of not participating in the playoffs since the Patriot League was founded with the Ivy League's athletics philosophy. from Patriot League

    • Out-of-league play for Patriot League schools is often with members of the Ivy League, which follow similar philosophies regarding academics and athletics. from Patriot League

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    • Outside of the Ivy League, it is the most selective group of higher education institutions in NCAA Division I and has the highest student-athlete graduation rate for both the NCAA graduation success rate and the federal graduation rate. from Patriot League

    • Its members consist of those whose main conferences do not sponsor wrestling, including the Ivy League, Patriot League, Northeast Conference, American Athletic Conference, and Colonial Athletic Association. from Eastern Intercollegiate Wrestling Association

    • During his presidency, he and Peter Likins of Lehigh University were the two college presidents contacted by the Ivy League in the first stage of the formation of the Patriot League during the early-1980s. from John E. Brooks

    • During his administration at Lehigh, he and the Reverend John E. Brooks, S.J. of the College of the Holy Cross were the two university presidents contacted by the Ivy League in the first stage of the formation of the Patriot League during the early-1980s. from Peter Likins

    • Today, Georgetown plays at the Division I Football Championship Subdivision, competing in the Patriot League and perennially plays against Ivy League schools. from Georgetown Hoyas

    • The America East Conference, Atlantic Sun Conference, Big Sky Conference, Big South, Big West Conference, Ivy League, MAAC, MAC, MEAC, MVC, NEC, Patriot League, Southern Conference, Southland, Summit League, and WAC each had one representative, eliminated in the second round with a record of 0–1. from 2011 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • The America East, Atlantic Sun, Big Sky, Big West, Ivy, MEAC, Mid-American, Mid-Continent, Northeast, Ohio Valley, Patriot, Southern, Southland, Sun Belt, SWAC, and WCC all went 0-1. from 2007 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Sixteen conferences — America East Conference, Atlantic Sun Conference, Big Sky Conference, Big South Conference, Big West Conference, Colonial Athletic Association, Ivy League, MAC, MEAC, Missouri Valley Conference, Ohio Valley Conference, Patriot League, Southland, SWAC, Summit League and WAC — went 0-1. from 2008 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Eighteen conferences went 0–1: the Atlantic Sun, Big Sky, Big South, Big West, Colonial, Conference USA, Ivy League, MAAC, MEAC, MAC, Missouri Valley, Northeast, Ohio Valley, Patriot, Southern, Southland, SWAC and Summit. from 2010 NCAA Women's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Canisius (MAAC), Lehigh (Patriot League), Loyola (ECAC), Massachusetts (CAA), Stony Brook (America East), Syracuse (Big East), and Yale (Ivy League), earned an automatic bid into the tournament by winning their respective conference tournaments. from 2012 NCAA Division I Men's Lacrosse Championship

    • The America East, Atlantic Sun, Big Sky, Big South, Big West, CAA, Ivy, MAC, MEAC, MVC, NEC, Patriot, Southland, SoCon, SWAC, Summit, and WAC conferences all went 0–1. from 2009 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • The America East, Atlantic Sun, Big Sky, Big South, CAA, Horizon League, Mid-Continent, Ivy, MAC, MEAC, Northeast, Ohio Valley, Patriot, SoCon, Southland, SWAC, and Sun Belt conferences all went 0–1. from 2004 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

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      Princeton Tigers men's lacrosse The Princeton Tigers men's lacrosse team represents Princeton University in National Collegiate Athletic…
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      The Princeton Tigers men's lacrosse team represents Princeton University in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I men's lacrosse. Princeton currently competes as a member of the Ivy League and plays its home games at the Class of 1952 Stadium in Princeton, New Jersey.…

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      The Princeton Tigers men's lacrosse team represents Princeton University in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I men's lacrosse. Princeton currently competes as a member of the Ivy League and plays its home games at the Class of 1952 Stadium in Princeton, New Jersey.
      Prior to the NCAA Men's Lacrosse Championship tournament, Princeton was voted as national champion six times, in 1884, 1885, 1937, 1942, 1951, and 1953. Princeton also went undefeated in Ivy League play from 1957 to 1963 (Ivy League lacrosse began in 1956), and tied with Harvard in 1960 in an otherwise perfect season. Between 1957 and 1965, the team won nine consecutive Ivy League titles. The team has since won ten consecutive Ivy League titles from 1995 through 2004. Between 1990 and 2003, Princeton appeared in 14 consecutive NCAA tournaments.
      Since 1990, Princeton has won six NCAA national championships and has qualified for 19 of the 21 Division I NCAA Men's Lacrosse Championship tournaments. All six championships were won under former head coach Bill Tierney, who coached the team from 1988 to 2009. Tierney also led the Princeton program to two second place finishes. In 2010, Chris Bates took over as head coach of the Princeton program. In 2010, Princeton won the inaugural Ivy League Lacrosse Tournament.

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    Connects To Princeton Tigers men's lacrosse

    • In men's lacrosse, Cornell and Princeton are perennial rivals, and they are the only two Ivy League teams to have won the NCAA tournament. from Ivy League

    • Princeton also went undefeated in Ivy League play from 1957 to 1963 (Ivy League lacrosse began in 1956), and tied with Harvard in 1960 in an otherwise perfect season. from Princeton Tigers men's lacrosse

    • Princeton currently competes as a member of the Ivy League and plays its home games at the Class of 1952 Stadium in Princeton, New Jersey. from Princeton Tigers men's lacrosse

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    • He starred as a member of the Princeton Tigers men's lacrosse team from 1995 through 1998, where he earned National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) lacrosse attackman of the year award, three United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association (USILA) All-American recognitions, four Ivy League championships, three national championships, an Ivy League Player of the Year award and an NCAA tournament most outstanding player award. from Jon Hess (lacrosse)

    • He starred as a member of the Princeton Tigers men's lacrosse team from 1995 through 1998, where he earned three United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association (USILA) All-American recognitions, four Ivy League championships, and three national championships. from Chris Massey (lacrosse)

    • Hubbard starred as a member of the Princeton Tigers men's lacrosse team from 1995 through 1998, where he earned Ivy League Player of the Year, Ivy League Rookie of the Year, three All-American recognitions from the United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association (USILA), four Ivy League championships, and three national championships. from Jesse Hubbard

    • Conference tournament champions that automatically qualified were: Army of the Patriot League, Delaware of the Colonial Athletic Association (CAA), Mount Saint Mary's of the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference (MAAC), Princeton of the Ivy League, and Stony Brook of the America East Conference. from 2010 NCAA Division I Men's Lacrosse Championship

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      Eastern Intercollegiate Basketball League The Eastern Intercollegiate Basketball League was an athletic conference for men’s college basketball, beginning…
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      The Eastern Intercollegiate Basketball League was an athletic conference for men’s college basketball, beginning with the 1901-02 season and ending with the 1954-55 season. Its membership ranged from four to eight members; all of these teams now compete in the Ivy League, which began play in 1955-56 and considers its men’s basketball league to be…

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      The Eastern Intercollegiate Basketball League was an athletic conference for men’s college basketball, beginning with the 1901-02 season and ending with the 1954-55 season. Its membership ranged from four to eight members; all of these teams now compete in the Ivy League, which began play in 1955-56 and considers its men’s basketball league to be a continuation of the EIBL. The EIBL/Ivy is the oldest basketball conference in the National Collegiate Athletic Association; the next oldest, the Big Ten Conference, began play in 1905-06.

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    Connects To Eastern Intercollegiate Basketball League

    • A basketball league was later created in 1902, when Columbia, Cornell, Harvard, Yale and Princeton formed the Eastern Intercollegiate Basketball League; they were later joined by Penn and Dartmouth. from Ivy League

    • During these years, the movement to form the Ivy League was gathering momentum, culminating in the 1954 agreement to establish formal competition. from Eastern Intercollegiate Basketball League

    • Its membership ranged from four to eight members; all of these teams now compete in the Ivy League, which began play in 1955-56 and considers its men’s basketball league to be a continuation of the EIBL. from Eastern Intercollegiate Basketball League

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    • Beginning with the 1901-1902 season and ending with the 1954-1955 season Cornell competed in the Eastern Intercollegiate Basketball League which at various points in its history consisted of between four and eight schools, all of whom would eventually join the Ivy League upon its creation in 1954. from Cornell Big Red men's basketball

    • The 2010–11 Ivy League men's basketball season marks the continuation of the annual tradition of competitive basketball among Ivy League members that began when the league was formed during the 1956–57 season, continuing from the predecessor Eastern Intercollegiate Basketball League, which was formed in 1902. from 2010–11 Ivy League men's basketball season

    • The 2011–12 Ivy League men's basketball season marked the continuation of the annual tradition of competitive basketball among Ivy League members that began when the league was formed during the 1956–57 season, continuing from the predecessor Eastern Intercollegiate Basketball League, which was formed in 1902. from 2011–12 Ivy League men's basketball season

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      Penn Quakers men's basketball The Penn Quakers men's basketball team is the college basketball program representing the University of…
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      The Penn Quakers men's basketball team is the college basketball program representing the University of Pennsylvania. As the eleventh-winningest men's basketball program of all-time, the team from Penn had its greatest success from 1966 to 2007, a period of over 40 years. Penn plays in the Ivy League in NCAA Division I.…

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      The Penn Quakers men's basketball team is the college basketball program representing the University of Pennsylvania. As the eleventh-winningest men's basketball program of all-time, the team from Penn had its greatest success from 1966 to 2007, a period of over 40 years. Penn plays in the Ivy League in NCAA Division I.
      On March 20, 1897 Penn and Yale played in the first basketball game with five players on a team. Prior to the formation of the Ivy League in 1954 Penn was a member of the Eastern Intercollegiate League (EIL) from 1903 thru 1955. Penn won 14 EIL Regular Season Championships - 1906, 1908, 1916, 1918, 1920, 1921, 1928, 1929, 1934, 1935, 1937, 1945, 1953, 1955.
      Penn has appeared in one Final Four, in 1979. Penn trails only Princeton for the most Ivy League regular season championships with 25 (1966, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1985, 1987, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1999, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007). Their main Ivy League rivalry is with Princeton, whom they always play as the last regular season game.
      One of Penn's most memorable seasons came in 1979 when the Quakers advanced to the NCAA Tournament Final Four. With players such as Tony Price, the Quakers stunned the nation with victories over Iona, North Carolina, Syracuse, and St. John's to advance to the Final Four. The Quakers faced Earvin "Magic" Johnson and Michigan State in the national semifinals in Salt Lake City, Utah, but ultimately were met with defeat, 101–67. Other notable Penn teams include the team led by guards Matt Maloney and Jerome Allen during the mid-1990s and the nationally ranked teams of the early 1970s led by Dave Wohl, Steve Bilsky, Corky Calhoun and Bob Morse. Penn's 1970–71 team completed an undefeated regular season (26–0) and advanced to the Eastern Regional Final in the NCAA Tournament, losing there to a Villanova team it had defeated during the regular season. Villanova lost to UCLA in the national championship game, but was later found to be using an ineligible player, Howard Porter.
      The last NCAA Tournament victory for the Quakers came on March 17, 1994, at the Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum in Uniondale, New York. The No. 11 Red and Blue defeated the No. 6 Nebraska Cornhuskers, 90–80, in the first round. The Quakers fell in the second round to No. 3 Florida on March 19, 1994, as the Gators prevailed, 70–58.

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    Connects To Penn Quakers men's basketball

    • For instance, Princeton and Penn are longstanding men's basketball rivals; "Puck Frinceton", and "Pennetrate the Puss" t-shirts are worn by Quaker fans at games. from Ivy League

    • Penn trails only Princeton for the most Ivy League regular season championships with 25 (1966, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1985, 1987, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1999, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007). from Penn Quakers men's basketball

    • Penn plays in the Ivy League in NCAA Division I. from Penn Quakers men's basketball

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    • A 6'8" power forward, Haigler helped guide the Quakers to several consecutive Ivy League titles as well as setting numerous offensive statistical records at Penn. from Ron Haigler

    • Penn won twenty or more games and captured the Ivy League title in each of its first four seasons with Daly at the helm. from Chuck Daly

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      Little Ivies The Little Ivies are a loosely-defined group of small, selective American liberal arts colleges.Institutions…
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      The Little Ivies are a loosely-defined group of small, selective American liberal arts colleges.
      Institutions identified as Little Ivies are usually old, socially and academically elite, small, exclusive, and academically competitive liberal arts colleges located in the northeastern United States. The colloquialism is meant to imply that Little Ivies share similarities of distinction with the universities of the Ivy League.

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    Connects To Little Ivies

    • Marketing groups, journalists, and some educators sometimes promote other colleges as "Ivies," as in Little Ivies (colloquialism referring to a group of small, selective American liberal arts colleges), Public Ivies, or Southern Ivies. from Ivy League

    • The colloquialism is meant to imply that Little Ivies share similarities of distinction with the universities of the Ivy League. from Little Ivies

    • Ivy stones are often placed on the sides of academic buildings at several American universities and colleges that are in the Ivy League or considered Little Ivies. from Ivy stone

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    • Recent graduates attend top-tier colleges and universities, including the Ivy League, "Little Ivies", and Jesuit colleges and universities. from Loyola School (New York City)

    • For instance, at the national level, with Ecole Centrale de Lyon, ENS Lyon (École Normale Supérieure de Lyon), EMLYON Business School and Paris Dauphine University; or at the international level with the best universities in the World; for instance, in Japan, Tohoku University and Waseda University; in South Korea, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies; in Germany, with the Universities of the German Universities Excellence Initiative (the Free University of Berlin; Goethe University Frankfurt, the University of Leipzig; the University of Mannheim); in Australia, with universities of the Group of Eight (University of Melbourne and the University of Sydney); in Canada, McGill University, the University of British Columbia, the Université de Montreal (including HEC Montréal) and the University of Toronto; in China, the East China Normal University and the University of Hong Kong; in the United Kingdom, colleges of the Golden Triangle such as the King's College London and the School of Oriental and African Studies of the University of London; in the United States, Georgetown University, Little Ivies such as the Bowdoin College, Public Ivy universities such as the University of Virginia and the University of California (including UCLA and the University of California, Berkeley), as well as Ivy League universities such as Brown University and the University of Pennsylvania (including the Wharton School). from Institut d'études politiques de Lyon

    • In 2006, Newsweek described Bowdoin as a "New Ivy", one of a number of elite colleges and universities outside of the Ivy League. from Bowdoin College

    • The Advanced Placement Diploma is designed for students expecting to apply to highly selective schools such as those in the Ivy League, Public Ivies or the Little Ivies. from Shenandoah Valley Academy

    • WASPs are still considered prominent at prep schools (expensive private high schools, primarily in the Northeast), Ivy League universities, and prestigious liberal arts colleges, such as the Little Ivies or Seven Sisters. from White Anglo-Saxon Protestant

    • While these relationships have continued, graduates now matriculate at a wide variety of highly selective colleges in the United States, including the Ivy League, the Little Ivies and the Ancient Universities. from Berwick Academy

    • Other early rivals included the Ivy League and the "Little Ivies", particularly Yale University starting in 1948, whom have played the Huskies for 50 years. from Connecticut Huskies football

    • Tufts is counted among the "Little Ivies" and was named by Newsweek as one of the "25 New Ivies" in 2006. from Tufts University

    • 100% of graduates attend a 4-year college or university, many attending Ivy League schools, "Little Ivies", and other respected colleges. from Lake Forest Academy

    • Ivy League universities, particularly Harvard and Yale, as well as "Little Ivy" liberal arts colleges, remained bastions of old Yankee culture until well after World War II. from Yankee

    • In addition to four out of eight Ivy League schools, New England also contains the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), four of the original Seven Sisters, the bulk of institutions identified as the Little Ivies, one of the eight original Public Ivies, the Colleges of Worcester Consortium in central Massachusetts, and the Five Colleges consortium in western Massachusetts. from New England

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      Public Ivy Public Ivy is a term coined by Richard Moll in his 1985 book Public Ivies: A Guide to America’s best public…
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      Public Ivy is a term coined by Richard Moll in his 1985 book Public Ivies: A Guide to America’s best public undergraduate colleges and universities to refer to universities that provide an Ivy League collegiate experience at a public school price. Public Ivies are considered, according to the Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, to…

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      Public Ivy is a term coined by Richard Moll in his 1985 book Public Ivies: A Guide to America’s best public undergraduate colleges and universities to refer to universities that provide an Ivy League collegiate experience at a public school price. Public Ivies are considered, according to the Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, to be capable of “successfully competing with the Ivy League schools in academic rigor... attracting superstar faculty and in competing for the best and brightest students of all races.”

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    Connects To Public Ivy

    • Public Ivy—is a term coined by Richard Moll to refer to universities that provide an Ivy League collegiate experience at a public school price. from Ivy League

    • Marketing groups, journalists, and some educators sometimes promote other colleges as "Ivies," as in Little Ivies (colloquialism referring to a group of small, selective American liberal arts colleges), Public Ivies, or Southern Ivies. from Ivy League

    • One of the Ivy League’s distinguishing characteristics is its prohibition on the awarding of athletic scholarships (athletes may only receive the same financial aid to which they would be entitled even if they did not play a sport). from Public Ivy

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    • One sharp distinction between the Ivy League and some “Public Ivies” is their participation in intercollegiate athletics. from Public Ivy

    • Public Ivy is a term coined by Richard Moll in his 1985 book Public Ivies: A Guide to America’s best public undergraduate colleges and universities to refer to universities that provide an Ivy League collegiate experience at a public school price. from Public Ivy

    • For instance, at the national level, with Ecole Centrale de Lyon, ENS Lyon (École Normale Supérieure de Lyon), EMLYON Business School and Paris Dauphine University; or at the international level with the best universities in the World; for instance, in Japan, Tohoku University and Waseda University; in South Korea, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies; in Germany, with the Universities of the German Universities Excellence Initiative (the Free University of Berlin; Goethe University Frankfurt, the University of Leipzig; the University of Mannheim); in Australia, with universities of the Group of Eight (University of Melbourne and the University of Sydney); in Canada, McGill University, the University of British Columbia, the Université de Montreal (including HEC Montréal) and the University of Toronto; in China, the East China Normal University and the University of Hong Kong; in the United Kingdom, colleges of the Golden Triangle such as the King's College London and the School of Oriental and African Studies of the University of London; in the United States, Georgetown University, Little Ivies such as the Bowdoin College, Public Ivy universities such as the University of Virginia and the University of California (including UCLA and the University of California, Berkeley), as well as Ivy League universities such as Brown University and the University of Pennsylvania (including the Wharton School). from Institut d'études politiques de Lyon

    • The Advanced Placement Diploma is designed for students expecting to apply to highly selective schools such as those in the Ivy League, Public Ivies or the Little Ivies. from Shenandoah Valley Academy

    • William & Mary is considered one of the original "Public Ivies," a publicly funded university providing a quality of education comparable to those of the Ivy League. from College of William & Mary

    • The University of Vermont and State Agricultural College, more commonly known as the University of Vermont or UVM, is a public research university and, after 1862, the U.S. state of Vermont's land-grant university. The University of Vermont is labeled one of the original "Public Ivies," a publicly funded university considered as providing a quality of education comparable to those of the Ivy League. from University of Vermont

    • Miami University is considered one of the original eight "Public Ivy" schools that provide a quality of education comparable to those of the Ivy League. from Miami University

    • Indiana has been labeled one of the "Public Ivies", a publicly funded university considered comparable to the quality of education at an Ivy League institution. from Indiana University Bloomington

    • Delaware has been labeled one of the "Public Ivies," a publicly funded university considered as providing a quality of education comparable to those of the Ivy League. from University of Delaware

    • North Carolina has been consistently listed among the highest ranked universities in the United States and is one of the original eight Public Ivy schools that provide an Ivy League experience for a public schooling price. from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    • Penn State has been labeled one of the "Public Ivies," a publicly funded university considered as providing a quality of education comparable to those of the Ivy League. from Pennsylvania State University

    • Howard and Matthew Greene named UC Davis a Public Ivy in 2001, a publicly funded university considered as providing a quality of education comparable to those of the Ivy League. from University of California, Davis

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      Seven Sisters (colleges) The Seven Sisters is a loose association of seven liberal arts colleges in the northeastern United States that are…
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      The Seven Sisters is a loose association of seven liberal arts colleges in the northeastern United States that are historically women's colleges. They are Barnard College, Bryn Mawr College, Mount Holyoke College, Radcliffe College, Smith College, Vassar College, and Wellesley College. All were founded between 1837 and 1889. Four are in Massachusetts, two are in…

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      The Seven Sisters is a loose association of seven liberal arts colleges in the northeastern United States that are historically women's colleges. They are Barnard College, Bryn Mawr College, Mount Holyoke College, Radcliffe College, Smith College, Vassar College, and Wellesley College. All were founded between 1837 and 1889. Four are in Massachusetts, two are in New York, and one is in Pennsylvania. Radcliffe (which merged with Harvard College) and Vassar (which is now coeducational) are no longer women's colleges.

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    How Ivy League
    Connects To Seven Sisters (colleges)

    • Before they became coeducational, many of the Ivy schools maintained extensive social ties with nearby Seven Sisters women's colleges, including weekend visits, dances and parties inviting Ivy and Seven Sisters students to mingle. from Ivy League

    • The 1978 film National Lampoon's Animal House satirizes a common practice (until the mid-1970s), when women attending Seven Sister colleges were connected with or to students at Ivy League schools. from Seven Sisters (colleges)

    • Harwarth, Maline, and DeBra also state that "the 'Seven Sisters' was the name given to Barnard, Smith, Mount Holyoke, Vassar, Bryn Mawr, Wellesley, and Radcliffe, because of their parallel to the Ivy League men’s colleges" in 1927. from Seven Sisters (colleges)

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    • It satirizes a common practice up until the mid-1970s, when women attending Seven Sister colleges were connected with or to students at Ivy League schools. from Mount Holyoke College

    • Vassar was the second of the Seven Sisters colleges, higher education schools then strictly for women, and historically sister institutions to the Ivy League. from Vassar College

    • Many graduates went on to Ivy League or Seven Sisters schools and to other prestigious institutions around the country and the world. from Rhodes Preparatory School

    • WASPs are still considered prominent at prep schools (expensive private high schools, primarily in the Northeast), Ivy League universities, and prestigious liberal arts colleges, such as the Little Ivies or Seven Sisters. from White Anglo-Saxon Protestant

    • Yale and Dartmouth are in the Ivy League and Smith and Mount Holyoke are in the Seven Sisters group of exclusive women's colleges. from New England Interstate Route 10

    • In addition to four out of eight Ivy League schools, New England also contains the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), four of the original Seven Sisters, the bulk of institutions identified as the Little Ivies, one of the eight original Public Ivies, the Colleges of Worcester Consortium in central Massachusetts, and the Five Colleges consortium in western Massachusetts. from New England

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      Penn–Princeton basketball rivalry The Penn–Princeton basketball rivalry is an American college basketball rivalry between the Penn Quakers men's…
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      The Penn–Princeton basketball rivalry is an American college basketball rivalry between the Penn Quakers men's basketball team of the University of Pennsylvania and Princeton Tigers men's basketball team of Princeton University. Having been contested every year since 1903, it is the third oldest consecutively played rivalry in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I history. Unlike…

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      The Penn–Princeton basketball rivalry is an American college basketball rivalry between the Penn Quakers men's basketball team of the University of Pennsylvania and Princeton Tigers men's basketball team of Princeton University. Having been contested every year since 1903, it is the third oldest consecutively played rivalry in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I history. Unlike many notable college basketball rivalries, such as Carolina–Duke, which involves teams that often both get invited to the same NCAA tournaments, Notre Dame–UCLA, which involves geographically remote teams, Illinois–Missouri, which involves non-conference rivals, or Alabama–Auburn, which takes a back seat to the football rivalry, this is a rivalry of geographically close, conference rivals, who compete for a single NCAA invitation and consider the basketball rivalry more important than other sports rivalries between the schools. A head-to-head contest has been the final regularly scheduled game of the Princeton season every year since 1995. Between 1963 and 2007, Princeton or Penn won or shared the Ivy League conference championship every season except 1986 and 1988. The other seasons in which neither team won or shared the Ivy League title are 1957, 1958, 1962, 2008–10, and 2012. The two programs dominate Ivy basketball in almost every way. Entering the 2013–14 NCAA Division I men's basketball season, 11 of the 12 active Division I basketball head coaches who are Ivy basketball alumni are from these two programs: Penn – Jerome Allen (Penn), Matt Langel (Colgate), Fran McCaffery (Iowa) and Andrew Toole (Robert Morris); Princeton – Mitch Henderson (Princeton), Sydney Johnson (Fairfield), Chris Mooney (Richmond), Craig Robinson (Oregon State), Joe Scott (Denver), John Thompson III (Georgetown) and Mike Brennan (American).
      Princeton had won 26 conference championships to Penn's 25. Princeton has been undefeated in conference 5 times: 1968–69, 1975–76, 1990–91, 1996–97 & 1997–98. Penn has been undefeated in conference 7 times: 1969–70, 1970–71, 1992–93, 1993–94, 1994–95, 1999–2000 & 2002–03. Four one-loss Penn teams suffered their only conference loss to Princeton: 1971–72, 1974–75, 1980–81 & 1998–99. The following one-loss Princeton teams suffered their only conference loss to Penn 1976–77, 1980–81 and 2003–04. Note that in the 1980–81 season both teams had one loss, and Princeton won a one-game playoff for the NCAA invitation. Also, in 1996 when both teams had two losses, the 1995–96 Tigers suffered their only conference losses to the 1995–96 Quakers, and Princeton won a one-game playoff for the automatic NCAA invitation.
      Princeton has a 24–23 edge in earning the Ivy League conference's bid to the NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament. Both teams have advanced to the NCAA Tournament final four once: 1964–65 Tigers and 1978–79 Quakers. Additionally, the 1974–75 Tigers won the 1975 National Invitation Tournament championship.

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    Connects To Penn–Princeton basketball rivalry

    • For instance, Princeton and Penn are longstanding men's basketball rivals; "Puck Frinceton", and "Pennetrate the Puss" t-shirts are worn by Quaker fans at games. from Ivy League

    • Between 1963 and 2007, Princeton or Penn won or shared the Ivy League conference championship every season except 1986 and 1988. from Penn–Princeton basketball rivalry

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      NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship The NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship is a single-elimination tournament played each spring in the…
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      The NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship is a single-elimination tournament played each spring in the United States, currently featuring 68 college basketball teams, to determine the national championship of the major college basketball teams. The tournament, organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), was created during 1939 by the National Association of Basketball…

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      The NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship is a single-elimination tournament played each spring in the United States, currently featuring 68 college basketball teams, to determine the national championship of the major college basketball teams. The tournament, organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), was created during 1939 by the National Association of Basketball Coaches, and was the idea of Ohio State University coach Harold Olsen. Played mostly during March, it is known informally as March Madness or the Big Dance, and has become one of the most famous annual sporting events in the United States. The NCAA has credited Bob Walsh of the Seattle Organizing Committee for starting the March Madness celebration during 1984.
      The tournament teams include champions from 32 Division I conferences (which receive automatic bids), and 36 teams which are awarded at-large berths. These "at-large" teams are chosen by an NCAA selection committee in a nationally televised event on the Sunday preceding the First Four play-in games, currently held in Dayton, Ohio, and dubbed Selection Sunday, as detailed below. The 68 teams are divided into four regions and organized into a single elimination "bracket", which predetermines, when a team wins a game, which team it will face next. Each team is "seeded", or ranked, within its region. After an initial four games between eight lower-ranked teams, the tournament occurs during the course of three weekends, at pre-selected neutral sites around the United States. Lower-ranked teams are placed in the bracket against higher ranked teams. Each weekend eliminates three quarters of the teams, from a round of 64, to a "Sweet Sixteen", and for the last weekend of the Tournament a Final Four; the Final Four is usually played during the first weekend of April. These four teams, one from each region, then compete in one location for the national championship.
      The tournament has been at least partially televised since 1969. Presently, the games are broadcast by CBS, TBS, TNT, and truTV by the trade-name NCAA March Madness. Since 2011, all games are available for viewing nationwide and internationally, especially in the Philippines and Canada. As television coverage has grown, so too has the tournament's popularity. Presently, millions of Americans "fill out a bracket", predicting the outcome of the tournament.
      With 11 national titles, UCLA has the record for the most NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championships; John Wooden coached UCLA to 10 of its 11 titles. The University of Kentucky is 2nd, with 8 national titles, while Indiana University and the University of North Carolina are tied for 3rd with 5 national titles. Duke University and the University of Connecticut are tied for 5th with 4 national titles. Since 1985, Duke and UConn have won four championships; Kentucky and UNC have won three; Florida, Kansas and Louisville have won two; and Arizona, Arkansas, Indiana, Maryland, Michigan, Michigan State, Syracuse, UCLA, UNLV and Villanova have all won one championship.

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    Connects To NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship

    • Unlike all other Division I basketball conferences, the Ivy League has no tournament for the league title; the school with the best conference record represents the conference in the Division I NCAA Men's and Women's Basketball Tournament (with a playoff, or playoffs, in the case of a tie). from Ivy League

    • The Ivy League is the only conference that does not conduct a tournament. from NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship

    • Princeton has appeared in 23 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournaments, 5 National Invitation Tournaments, the 2010 College Basketball Invitational and 8 Ivy League one-game playoffs. from Princeton Tigers men's basketball

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    • The team currently competes in the Ivy League in Division I of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and play home games at the Lavietes Pavilion in Boston, Massachusetts. The team's last appearance in the NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament was in 2013, where Harvard upset 3-seed New Mexico 68-62 for the university's first-ever NCAA tournament win. from Harvard Crimson men's basketball

    • The team currently competes in the Ivy League in Division I of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and play home games at the Lavietes Pavilion in Boston, Massachusetts. The team's last appearance in the NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament was in 2013, where they beat New Mexico in the second round in a 14 to 3 seed upset. from Harvard Crimson

    • His second season in 1995–96 ended with UCLA's 43–41 upset loss to Ivy League champion Princeton in the first round of the NCAA tournament. from Kris Johnson (basketball)

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      Cornell Big Red men's lacrosse The Cornell Big Red Men's Lacrosse team represents Cornell University in National Collegiate Athletic Association…
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      The Cornell Big Red Men's Lacrosse team represents Cornell University in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I men's lacrosse. Cornell competes as a member of the Ivy League, of which they have won 28 conference championships (18 outright, 10 shared), more than any other school (Princeton has won 26). The team was undefeated and…

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      The Cornell Big Red Men's Lacrosse team represents Cornell University in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I men's lacrosse. Cornell competes as a member of the Ivy League, of which they have won 28 conference championships (18 outright, 10 shared), more than any other school (Princeton has won 26). The team was undefeated and untied in league play during 17 of their 18 outright championships, the most of any team. The Big Red have appeared in the NCAA tournament 26 times. They have won the three championships and were runner up four times, most recently in 2009 when they lost to Syracuse in overtime 10-9. Cornell maintains one of the oldest rivalries in college lacrosse with the Hobart College Statesmen. Their main Ivy League rivalry is with Princeton. Cornell claims four pre-NCAA era and three NCAA national championships.

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    Connects To Cornell Big Red men's lacrosse

    • In men's lacrosse, Cornell and Princeton are perennial rivals, and they are the only two Ivy League teams to have won the NCAA tournament. from Ivy League

    • Cornell competes as a member of the Ivy League, of which they have won 28 conference championships (18 outright, 10 shared), more than any other school (Princeton has won 26). from Cornell Big Red men's lacrosse

    • In 2007, Virginia posted a regular-season record of 12-3 and were ranked #3 behind ACC champion Duke and the undefeated Ivy League champion, Cornell. from Virginia Cavaliers men's lacrosse

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      Dartmouth College Dartmouth College, commonly referred to as Dartmouth (/ˈdɑrtməθ/ DART-məth), is a private Ivy League research…
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      Dartmouth College, commonly referred to as Dartmouth (/ˈdɑrtməθ/ DART-məth), is a private Ivy League research university located in Hanover, New Hampshire. It consists of a liberal arts college, the Geisel School of Medicine, the Thayer School of Engineering, and the Tuck School of Business, as well as 19 graduate programs in the arts and sciences.…

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      Dartmouth College, commonly referred to as Dartmouth (/ˈdɑrtməθ/ DART-məth), is a private Ivy League research university located in Hanover, New Hampshire. It consists of a liberal arts college, the Geisel School of Medicine, the Thayer School of Engineering, and the Tuck School of Business, as well as 19 graduate programs in the arts and sciences. Incorporated as the "Trustees of Dartmouth College," it is one of the nine Colonial Colleges founded before the American Revolution. With an undergraduate enrollment of 4,194 and a total student enrollment of 6,144, Dartmouth is the smallest university in the Ivy League.
      Dartmouth College was established in 1769 by Eleazar Wheelock, a Congregational minister. After a long period of financial and political struggles, Dartmouth emerged in the early 20th century from relative obscurity. Dartmouth alumni, from Daniel Webster to the many donors in the 19th and 20th centuries, have been famously involved in their college.
      Dartmouth's somewhat isolated rural 269-acre (1.09 km2) campus is in the Upper Valley region of New Hampshire. Participation in athletics and the school's Greek system is strong. Dartmouth's 34 varsity sports teams compete in the Ivy League conference of the NCAA Division I. Students are well known for preserving a variety of strong campus traditions.

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    Connects To Dartmouth College

    • Dartmouth's athletic teams compete in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I eight-member Ivy League conference; some teams also participate in the Eastern College Athletic Conference (ECAC). from Dartmouth College

    • Dartmouth's 34 varsity sports teams compete in the Ivy League conference of the NCAA Division I. Students are well known for preserving a variety of strong campus traditions. from Dartmouth College

    • Dartmouth College, commonly referred to as Dartmouth ( ), is a private Ivy League research university located in Hanover, New Hampshire. from Dartmouth College

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    • In 1936, sportswriter John Kieran noted that student editors at Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Cornell, Columbia, Dartmouth, and Penn were advocating the formation of an athletic association. from Ivy League

    • The eight institutions are Brown University, Columbia University, Cornell University, Dartmouth College, Harvard University, Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and Yale University. from Ivy League

    • The Dartmouth Big Green football team represents Dartmouth College in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) college football competition as a member of the Ivy League. from Dartmouth Big Green football

    • The Board of Trustees of Dartmouth College is the governing body of Dartmouth College, an Ivy League university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, United States. from Board of Trustees of Dartmouth College

    • An American, Broberg played basketball as a forward at Dartmouth College from 1938 to 1941, where he became the first Ivy League player to lead the conference in scoring for three straight seasons; he scored 13.8 points per game (ppg) as a sophomore, 14.5 ppg as a junior and 14.9 ppg as a senior. from Gus Broberg

    • is a grass-covered field and common space at the center of Dartmouth College, an Ivy League university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, United States. from The Green (Dartmouth College)

    • James Edward Wright (born August 16, 1939 ) is a historian who serves on the faculty of Dartmouth College, an Ivy League university in Hanover, New Hampshire, from 1969 to present, and was that institution's president from 1998 to 2009. from James Wright (historian)

    • The "Alma Mater" is the official school song of Dartmouth College, an Ivy League college located in Hanover, New Hampshire, United States. from Alma Mater (Dartmouth College)

    • The Dartmouth College Marching Band (abbr. DCMB) is an officially recognized student organization of Dartmouth College, and is the oldest marching band in the Ivy League . from Dartmouth College Marching Band

    • This list of Dartmouth College faculty includes current and former instructors and administrators of Dartmouth College, an Ivy League university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, United States. from List of Dartmouth College faculty

    • Seven of the nine colonial colleges are part of the Ivy League athletic conference: Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Penn, Columbia, Brown, and Dartmouth. from List of Colonial Colleges

    • Dickey served as President of Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire, from 1945 to 1970, and helped revitalize the Ivy League institution. from John Sloan Dickey

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      Harvard–Yale football rivalry The Harvard–Yale football rivalry, the oldest rivalry in US college football and also known as The Game by some…
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      The Harvard–Yale football rivalry, the oldest rivalry in US college football and also known as The Game by some followers, is an American college football rivalry between the Harvard Crimson football team of Harvard University and Yale Bulldogs football team of Yale University. The Game is played in November at the end of the football season, with the venue alternating between Harvard Stadium and the Yale Bowl. Through the 2013 game, Yale leads the series 65–57–8.…

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      The Harvard–Yale football rivalry, the oldest rivalry in US college football and also known as The Game by some followers, is an American college football rivalry between the Harvard Crimson football team of Harvard University and Yale Bulldogs football team of Yale University. The Game is played in November at the end of the football season, with the venue alternating between Harvard Stadium and the Yale Bowl. Through the 2013 game, Yale leads the series 65–57–8.
      Before the 1916 Game, Yale coach T.A.D. Jones inspired his players to victory (6–3) when he unequivocally asserted, "Gentlemen, you are now going to play football against Harvard. Never again in your whole life will you do anything so important."

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    Connects To Harvard–Yale football rivalry

    • Harvard and Yale are football and crew rivals although the competition has become unbalanced; Harvard has won all but one of the last 11 football games and all but one of the last 13 crew races. from Ivy League

    • Since 1900, The Game has been the final game of the season for both teams, since Ivy League schools do not participate in post-season football games (the one exception occurring in 1919, when Harvard beat Yale 3–0 and then went on to the 1920 Rose Bowl Game, in which they defeated Oregon 7–6). from Harvard–Yale football rivalry

    • On Harvard Time's November 2008 , mocking Yale University before the annual Harvard-Yale football game, was named 2008 Ivy League Video of the Year by IvyGate Blog. from Harvard Undergraduate Television

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    • Jones played offensive guard on Harvard's undefeated 1968 varsity football team, was nominated as a first-team All-Ivy League selection, and played in the 1968 Game, which featured a memorable and literally last-minute Harvard 16-point comeback to tie Yale. from Tommy Lee Jones

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    1. 13
      Southern Ivy Southern Ivy is an informal term, and not an official body, that has been used in the U.S. to compare Southern…
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      Southern Ivy is an informal term, and not an official body, that has been used in the U.S. to compare Southern universities to the schools of the northeastern Ivy League in some way, usually in academic quality or in social prestige. The "Southern Ivy League," referred to as the "Magnolia League", was also a failed…

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      Southern Ivy is an informal term, and not an official body, that has been used in the U.S. to compare Southern universities to the schools of the northeastern Ivy League in some way, usually in academic quality or in social prestige. The "Southern Ivy League," referred to as the "Magnolia League", was also a failed attempt to construct an athletic conference with schools that had similar "academic missions and philosophies". Given that the term is colloquial, there is no comprehensive, objective or definitive list of schools that are considered "Southern Ivies".

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    Connects To Southern Ivy

    • Marketing groups, journalists, and some educators sometimes promote other colleges as "Ivies," as in Little Ivies (colloquialism referring to a group of small, selective American liberal arts colleges), Public Ivies, or Southern Ivies. from Ivy League

    • Southern Ivy is an informal term, and not an official body, that has been used in the U.S. to compare Southern universities to the schools of the northeastern Ivy League in some way, usually in academic quality or in social prestige. from Southern Ivy

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      Cornell–Harvard hockey rivalry The Cornell–Harvard hockey rivalry is a men's ice hockey sports rivalry between the Big Red of Cornell University…
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      The Cornell–Harvard hockey rivalry is a men's ice hockey sports rivalry between the Big Red of Cornell University and Crimson of Harvard University dating back to 1910.…

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      The Cornell–Harvard hockey rivalry is a men's ice hockey sports rivalry between the Big Red of Cornell University and Crimson of Harvard University dating back to 1910.
      Cornell and Harvard play each other twice each regular season with games at Cornell's Lynah Rink in Ithaca, New York and Harvard's Bright Hockey Center in Allston, Massachusetts. The success of both programs ensures that postseason meetings are common. The rivals meet more than twice each season frequently. Cornell and Harvard have met 143 times on the ice including their first contest on January 8, 1910. Cornell leads the series 73-61-9 as of March 1, 2014.

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    Connects To Cornell–Harvard hockey rivalry

    • Rivalries exist between other Ivy league teams in other sports, including Cornell and Harvard in hockey, Harvard and Princeton in swimming, and Harvard and Penn in football (Penn and Harvard have each had two unbeaten seasons since 2001). from Ivy League

    • The rivalry between Cornell and Harvard pits the oldest member of the Ivy League that was founded 140 years before the signing of the Declaration of Independence against the youngest member of the Ivy League that attained the age of 140 years just recently. from Cornell–Harvard hockey rivalry

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      Ivy Rugby Conference The Ivy Rugby Conference is an annual rugby union competition played among the eight member schools of the Ivy…
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      The Ivy Rugby Conference is an annual rugby union competition played among the eight member schools of the Ivy League. The Ivy Rugby Conference was formed in 2009. The Ivy Rugby Conference was formed to foster better competition among rugby teams from the Ivy League schools and to raise the quality of play. Ivy Rugby…

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      The Ivy Rugby Conference is an annual rugby union competition played among the eight member schools of the Ivy League. The Ivy Rugby Conference was formed in 2009. The Ivy Rugby Conference was formed to foster better competition among rugby teams from the Ivy League schools and to raise the quality of play. Ivy Rugby formed committees to manage the league, independently of the LAUs and TUs. The Ivy Rugby Conference, and specifically its sevens tournament, has enabled the Ivy schools to tap into existing rivalries and fan bases.
      Ivy Rugby has had consistent success in attracting commercial sponsors. Sponsors have included H2H, Royall Lyme and Boathouse Sports.
      The Ivy League schools have a rich rugby tradition that pre-dates the formation of the Ivy conference. The eight Ivy League schools competed in the Ivy Rugby Championship Tournament from 1969 until the Ivy Rugby Conference was formed in 2009. The Ivy Rugby logo was developed in 2005.
      In addition to the traditional 15-a-side rugby union competition, the teams play yearly for the Ivy Rugby 7s Championship held the first Saturday in November.

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    Connects To Ivy Rugby Conference

    • Although these teams are not "varsity" sports, they compete annually in the Ivy Rugby Conference. from Ivy League

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      Division I (NCAA) Division I (D-I) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic…
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      Division I (D-I) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) in the United States. D-I schools include the major collegiate athletic powers, with larger budgets, more elaborate facilities, and more athletic scholarships than Divisions II and III as well as many smaller schools committed to the highest level of intercollegiate competition.…

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      Division I (D-I) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) in the United States. D-I schools include the major collegiate athletic powers, with larger budgets, more elaborate facilities, and more athletic scholarships than Divisions II and III as well as many smaller schools committed to the highest level of intercollegiate competition.
      This level was once called the University Division of the NCAA, in contrast to the College Division; this terminology was replaced with numeric divisions (I, II, III) in 1973. In football only, Division I was further subdivided in 1978 into Division I-A (the principal football schools) and Division I-AA. In 2006, Division I-A and I-AA were renamed "Football Bowl Subdivision" (FBS) and "Football Championship Subdivision" (FCS), which, along with the "Non-Football" schools, now make up all of Division I. For the 2012-13 school year, Division I contains 340 of the NCAA's 1,066 member institutions, with 126 in FBS, 122 in FCS, and 98 in NFS. There was a moratorium on any additional movement up to D-I until 2012, after which any school desirous of moving to D-I must first be accepted for membership by a conference and must show the NCAA that it has the financial ability to support a D-I program.
      All D-I schools must field teams in at least seven sports for men and seven for women or six for men and eight for women, with at least two team sports for each gender. There are several other NCAA sanctioned minimums and differences that distinguish Division I from Divisions II and III.
      In addition to the schools that compete fully as D-I institutions, the NCAA allows D-II and D-III schools to classify one men's and one women's sport (other than football or basketball) as a D-I sport, as long as they had been sponsoring those sports prior to the latest rules change in 2011. Also, Division II schools are eligible to compete for Division I national championships in sports that do not have a Division II national championship, and in those sports may also operate under D-I rules and scholarship limits.

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    Connects To Division I (NCAA)

    • The term became official after the formation of the NCAA Division I athletic conference in 1954. from Ivy League

    • A few Championship Subdivision conferences are composed of schools that offer no athletic scholarships at all, most notably the Ivy League and the Pioneer Football League (PFL), a football-only conference. from Division I (NCAA)

    • The Ivy League was lowered to I-AA (FCS) following the 1981 season, and plays a strict ten-game schedule. from Division I (NCAA)

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    • While another D-I all-sports conference, the Ivy League, recognizes ice hockey champions for both sexes, it does not directly sponsor the sport; it instead uses the results of regular-season ECAC Hockey matches involving two Ivy League schools to extrapolate an Ivy champion (all six Ivy League schools that sponsor varsity hockey compete in ECAC Hockey). from Division I (NCAA)

    • Outside of the Ivy League, it is the most selective group of higher education institutions in NCAA Division I and has the highest student-athlete graduation rate for both the NCAA graduation success rate and the federal graduation rate. from Patriot League

    • The school competes in the Ivy League in Division I of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). from Princeton Tigers men's basketball

    • Penn plays in the Ivy League in NCAA Division I. from Penn Quakers men's basketball

    • The team is a member of the Ivy League, which is part of the National Collegiate Athletic Association's Division I. from Cornell Big Red baseball

    • Dartmouth's teams compete in the Ivy League conference of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I, as well as in the ECAC Hockey conference. from Dartmouth Big Green

    • The team currently competes in the Ivy League in Division I of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and play home games at the Lavietes Pavilion in Boston, Massachusetts. The team's last appearance in the NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament was in 2013, where they beat New Mexico in the second round in a 14 to 3 seed upset. from Harvard Crimson

    • The Ivy League Baseball Championship Series is the conference baseball championship of the NCAA Division I Ivy League. from Ivy League Baseball Championship Series

    • Cornell participates in NCAA Division I as part of the Ivy League. from Cornell Big Red

    • It is home to the Columbia Lions baseball team of the NCAA Division I Ivy League. from Robertson Field at Satow Stadium

    • The Cornell Big Red football team represents Cornell University in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) college football competition as a member of the Ivy League. from Cornell Big Red football

    • The Cornell Big Red men's basketball team represents Cornell University (one of eight members Ivy League), located in Ithaca, New York, in NCAA Division I men's competition. from Cornell Big Red men's basketball

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    1. 17
      Black Ivy League The Black Ivy League is a colloquial term that at times referred to the historically black colleges in the United…
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      The Black Ivy League is a colloquial term that at times referred to the historically black colleges in the United States that attracted top African American students prior to the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s. Similar groups include: Public Ivies, Southern Ivies, and the Little Ivies, among others, none of which have canonical definitions. Generally, these schools have avoided using the term "Black Ivy League" to describe themselves.…

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      The Black Ivy League is a colloquial term that at times referred to the historically black colleges in the United States that attracted top African American students prior to the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s. Similar groups include: Public Ivies, Southern Ivies, and the Little Ivies, among others, none of which have canonical definitions. Generally, these schools have avoided using the term "Black Ivy League" to describe themselves.
      There is no agreement as to which schools are included in the "Black Ivy League", and sources list different possible members. The 1984 book Blacks in Colleges by Dr. Jacqueline Fleming, states that "... schools that make up the 'Black Ivy league' [include] (Fisk, Morehouse, Spelman, Dillard, Howard, Clark-Atlanta, Hampton and Tuskegee)." Fleming further notes that, "[t]he presence of Black Ivy League colleges pull the best and most privileged black students... [A]ll seven are unique schools, with little overlap among them." Bill Maxwell, in a 2003 series on Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), coincides with Fleming in describing the Black Ivy League institutions as being "Howard University, Hampton University, Spelman College, Fisk University, Morehouse College, Tuskegee University and Dillard University." The North Star News described "Howard, Fisk, Hampton, Morehouse, Morgan, Tuskegee, and Cheyney ... as the equivalent of a Black Ivy League." Lincoln University in Pennsylvania has also been mentioned as being included in the group. In 1976, the Chicago Tribune included "Morehouse, Atlanta University, Morris Brown, Gannon, Clark and Spelman..."
      The actual Ivy League is an eight-member athletic conference. At one point in history, some of the above mentioned schools debated forming a Black Ivy League athletic conference without reaching an agreement. However, since the phrase "Ivy League" is now a registered trademark of the athletic conference, any formal organization formed by the above mentioned schools could not be named "Black Ivy League" without a license.

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    Connects To Black Ivy League

    • Black Ivy League—informal list of colleges that attracted top African American students prior to the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s. from Ivy League

    • Since the 1960s, the Ivy League has actively recruited blacks who now play prominent roles in each of its institutions, including faculty holding endowed professorships, head athletic coaches, deans, and one president, Ruth Simmons of Brown University. From 1967 to 1976, black enrollment in Ivy League colleges rose from 2.3% to 6.3%. from Black Ivy League

    • However, since the 1960s, these institutions have had great difficulty in competing with Ivy League and other historically white colleges for top students and faculty The North Star News notes, "As Blacks enrolled in predominantly white colleges and southern states did not invest in Black colleges, HBCU’s were put at a distinct disadvantage. from Black Ivy League

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    1. 18
      Hidden Ivies Hidden Ivies: Thirty Colleges of Excellence is a college educational guide published in 2000. It concerns college…
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      Hidden Ivies: Thirty Colleges of Excellence is a college educational guide published in 2000. It concerns college admissions in the United States. The authors define both the title of this book as well as their goals in writing it on page one in the following manner: "Our mission in writing this book for students and…

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      Hidden Ivies: Thirty Colleges of Excellence is a college educational guide published in 2000. It concerns college admissions in the United States. The authors define both the title of this book as well as their goals in writing it on page one in the following manner: "Our mission in writing this book for students and parents is to create greater awareness of the small, distinctive cluster of colleges and universities of excellence that are available to gifted college-bound students." In the introduction, the authors further explain their aim by referring specifically to "the group historically known as the 'Little Ivies' (including Amherst, Bowdoin, Middlebury, Swarthmore, Wesleyan, and Williams)" which the authors say have "scaled the heights of prestige and selectivity and also turn away thousands of our best and brightest young men and women." The second edition includes the assessment of all the institutions considered "Little Ivies" except Connecticut College. Connecticut College is referenced on three occasions in the book for its affiliation and student exchange program with other Little Ivies, and the college is included in Appendix II as another college of excellence.
      In this book, the authors (using the same criteria often used to evaluate Ivy League schools) discuss thirty American schools that are small in size and are either liberal arts colleges or universities that emulate them. The Hidden Ivies: 50 Top Colleges - From Amherst to Williams - That Rival the Ivy League, the second edition of the guide published in 2009, evaluates fifty "renowned academic institutions."
      Nine of the fifty schools in the second edition are located in the Midwestern United States, 24 in the Northeastern United States, 11 in the Southern United States, and six in the Western United States.

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    Connects To Hidden Ivies

    • In this book, the authors (using the same criteria often used to evaluate Ivy League schools) discuss thirty American schools that are small in size and are either liberal arts colleges or universities that emulate them. from Hidden Ivies

    • In July 2006, The New York Times included Grinnell in its profile of the 20 colleges and universities of "established or rising scholarship" which are fast becoming viable alternatives to Ivy League institutions, and is considered one of the 30 Hidden Ivies. from Grinnell College

    1. 19
      NCAA Division I Football Championship The NCAA Division I Football Championship is an American college football tournament played each year to determine…
    1. 19

      The NCAA Division I Football Championship is an American college football tournament played each year to determine the champion of the NCAA Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS). Prior to the year 2006, the game was known as the NCAA Division I-AA Football Championship. The FCS has historically the highest division in college football to…

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      The NCAA Division I Football Championship is an American college football tournament played each year to determine the champion of the NCAA Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS). Prior to the year 2006, the game was known as the NCAA Division I-AA Football Championship. The FCS has historically the highest division in college football to hold a playoff tournament to determine its champion; its 24-team tournament is still far larger than the four-team playoff system to be used used by the Bowl Subdivision beginning in the 2014 season.
      The reigning national champions are the North Dakota State University Bison, which also won the championship in 2011 and in 2012, the first team to win three consecutive titles since Appalachian State accomplished this feat in 2005–2007. In the first two title games the Bison defeated the Sam Houston State University Bearkats, 17–6 on January 7, 2012, and 39–13 on January 5, 2013. The third title was a 35–7 over Towson University on January 4, 2014. All three games were played at Toyota Stadium in the Dallas suburb of Frisco, Texas.

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    Connects To NCAA Division I Football Championship

    • Beginning with the 1982 football season, the Ivy League has competed in Division I-AA (renamed FCS in 2006). from Ivy League

    • The Ivy League, I-AA since 1982, plays a strict ten-game regular season and does not participate in any post-season football, citing academic concerns. from NCAA Division I Football Championship

    • Today, Georgetown plays at the Division I Football Championship Subdivision, competing in the Patriot League and perennially plays against Ivy League schools. from Georgetown Hoyas

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    • The four Cornell statutory colleges compete as a part of the Ivy League, an FCS conference that chooses not to participate in the FCS postseason tournament. from State University of New York

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    1. 20
      NCAA Women's Division I Basketball Championship The NCAA Women's Division I Championship is an annual college basketball tournament for women. Held each April, the…
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      The NCAA Women's Division I Championship is an annual college basketball tournament for women. Held each April, the Women's Championship was inaugurated in the 1981–82 season. The NCAA tournament was preceded by the AIAW Women's Basketball Tournament, which was held annually from 1972 to 1982. Basketball was one of 12 women's sports added to the…

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      The NCAA Women's Division I Championship is an annual college basketball tournament for women. Held each April, the Women's Championship was inaugurated in the 1981–82 season. The NCAA tournament was preceded by the AIAW Women's Basketball Tournament, which was held annually from 1972 to 1982. Basketball was one of 12 women's sports added to the NCAA championship program for the 1981-82 school year, as the NCAA engaged in battle with the Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women for sole governance of women's collegiate sports. The AIAW continued to conduct its established championship program in the same 12 (and other) sports; however, after a year of dual women's championships, the NCAA prevailed, while the AIAW disbanded.
      Attendance and interest in the Women's Division I Championship have grown over the years, especially since 2003, when the final championship game was moved to the Tuesday following the Monday men's championship game. The women's championship game is now the final overall game of the college basketball season. Before that, the Women's Final Four was usually played on the Friday before the Men's Final Four or the hours before the men played on the final Saturday of the tournament. The final was usually played the Sunday afternoon following the Men's Final Four.
      The tournament bracket is made up of champions from each Division I conference, which receive automatic bids. The remaining slots are at-large bids, with teams chosen by an NCAA selection committee. The selection process and tournament seedings are based on several factors, including team rankings, win-loss records and Ratings Percentage Index (RPI) data.
      Unlike the men's tournament, there are only 32 at-large bids (since 2014), and no play-in game. The women's tournament, like the men's, is staged in a single elimination format, and is part of the media and public frenzy known colloquially as March Madness or The Big Dance.
      All 63 games have been broadcast on television since 2003 on ESPN and ESPN2. Similar to the pre-2011 men's tournament coverage on CBS, local teams are shown on each channel when available, with "whip-around" coverage designed to showcase the most competitive contests in the rest of the country.

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    Connects To NCAA Women's Division I Basketball Championship

    • Unlike all other Division I basketball conferences, the Ivy League has no tournament for the league title; the school with the best conference record represents the conference in the Division I NCAA Men's and Women's Basketball Tournament (with a playoff, or playoffs, in the case of a tie). from Ivy League

    • Since the Ivy League does not conduct a post-season tournament, the regular-season conference champion receives an automatic bid. from NCAA Women's Division I Basketball Championship

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      Intercollegiate Rowing Association The Intercollegiate Rowing Association runs the IRA National Championship Regatta, which is considered to be the…
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      The Intercollegiate Rowing Association runs the IRA National Championship Regatta, which is considered to be the United States collegiate national championship of rowing. Since 1995, it has been held in numerous locations, such as the Cooper River in Pennsauken, New Jersey. This regatta includes both men's and women's (lightweight) events for sweep boats of all…

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      The Intercollegiate Rowing Association runs the IRA National Championship Regatta, which is considered to be the United States collegiate national championship of rowing. Since 1995, it has been held in numerous locations, such as the Cooper River in Pennsauken, New Jersey. This regatta includes both men's and women's (lightweight) events for sweep boats of all sizes. Today, Columbia, Cornell, Pennsylvania, Navy, and Syracuse are members of the association. Each year these five schools choose whom to invite to the regatta and are responsible for its organization along with the ECAC. The IRA is the oldest college rowing championship in the United States.

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    How Ivy League
    Connects To Intercollegiate Rowing Association

    • Most recently, on the men's side, Harvard won the Intercollegiate Rowing Association Championships in 2003, 2004, 2005, and on the women's side Brown won the team championship in 2007, 2008 and 2011 NCAA Rowing Championships and Yale won the NCAA title for the I-eight event (the most elite event) in 2007, 2008 and 2010. from Ivy League

    • In 1895, Cornell, Columbia, and Penn founded the Intercollegiate Rowing Association, which remains the oldest collegiate athletic organizing body in the US. from Ivy League

    • However, on the east coast, most Ivy League and EARC schools have excellent, well-funded men's lightweight teams; the lightweight men's events at Eastern Sprints and the Intercollegiate Rowing Association Championship (IRAs) are fiercely contested. from College rowing (United States)

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      Lafayette College Lafayette College is a private coeducational liberal arts and engineering college located in Easton, Pennsylvania…
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      Lafayette College is a private coeducational liberal arts and engineering college located in Easton, Pennsylvania, USA. The school, founded in 1826 by James Madison Porter, son of General Andrew Porter of Norristown and the citizens of Easton, first began holding classes in 1832. The founders voted to name the school after General Lafayette, who famously toured the country in 1824–25, as "a testimony of respect for [his] talents, virtues, and signal services...the great cause of freedom".…

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      Lafayette College is a private coeducational liberal arts and engineering college located in Easton, Pennsylvania, USA. The school, founded in 1826 by James Madison Porter, son of General Andrew Porter of Norristown and the citizens of Easton, first began holding classes in 1832. The founders voted to name the school after General Lafayette, who famously toured the country in 1824–25, as "a testimony of respect for [his] talents, virtues, and signal services...the great cause of freedom".
      Located on College Hill in Easton, the campus is situated in the Lehigh Valley, about 70 mi (110 km) west of New York City and 60 mi (97 km) north of Philadelphia. Lafayette College guarantees campus housing to all enrolled students. The school requires students to live in campus housing unless approved for residing in private off-campus housing or home as a commuter.
      The student body, consisting entirely of undergraduates, comes from 42 U.S. states and 37 countries. Students at Lafayette are involved in over 250 clubs and organizations including athletics, fraternities and sororities, special interest groups, community service clubs and honor societies. Lafayette College's athletic program is notable for The Rivalry with nearby Lehigh University. Since 1884, the two football teams have met 149 times, making it the most played rivalry in the history of college football.

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    Connects To Lafayette College

    • The Yale-Princeton series is the nation's second longest, exceeded only by "The Rivalry" between Lehigh and Lafayette, which began later in 1884 but included two or three games in each of 17 early seasons. from Ivy League

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      The Rivalry (Lehigh–Lafayette) The Rivalry is an American college football rivalry game played by the Lafayette Leopards football team of…
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      The Rivalry is an American college football rivalry game played by the Lafayette Leopards football team of Lafayette College and the Lehigh Mountain Hawks football team of Lehigh University. It is the most-played football rivalry in the nation and the longest uninterrupted annual rivalry series. As of 2013, "The Rivalry" has been played 149 times…

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      The Rivalry is an American college football rivalry game played by the Lafayette Leopards football team of Lafayette College and the Lehigh Mountain Hawks football team of Lehigh University. It is the most-played football rivalry in the nation and the longest uninterrupted annual rivalry series. As of 2013, "The Rivalry" has been played 149 times since 1884 with only a single interruption in 1896. The college's football teams met twice annually (except 1891, when they played three games, and 1896, when they did not play at all) until 1901. The two institutions are located seventeen miles apart in eastern Pennsylvania. Though primarily alluding to football, "The Rivalry" pertains to a meeting between the two schools in all sports and other endeavors.
      Despite popular belief, Harvard and Yale did not play The Game in four separate years during The Rivalry's current streak of 121 consecutive games. Furthermore, Lehigh and Lafayette met twice per season in 1943 and 1944 during World War II. The Rivalry is so old that it predates football trophies; the winning team just gets to keep the game ball. These are painted with the score and displayed in winning institution's hall of fame or in the case of Lafayette, the President's house. The evolution of the shape of the football can be seen in the displays of past game balls, since the early ones predate even the invention of the forward pass.
      The football game is usually sold out months in advance and has inspired books and a PBS television documentary narrated by Harry Kalas. In 2006, ESPNU ranked The Rivalry No. 8 in their Top Ten College Football Rivalries, and Sports Illustrated has told its readers that seeing it "is something you have to do once in your life."
      On November 17, 2012, prior to the 148th game, the presidents of Lafayette College and Lehigh University, Daniel Weiss and Alice Gast, respectively, jointly announced that the 150th game will be played on November 22, 2014 at Yankee Stadium in New York City, and will be broadcast on ESPN.

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    Connects To The Rivalry (Lehigh–Lafayette)

    • The Yale-Princeton series is the nation's second longest, exceeded only by "The Rivalry" between Lehigh and Lafayette, which began later in 1884 but included two or three games in each of 17 early seasons. from Ivy League

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      ECAC Hockey ECAC Hockey is one of the six conferences that compete in NCAA Division I ice hockey. The conference used to be…
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      ECAC Hockey is one of the six conferences that compete in NCAA Division I ice hockey. The conference used to be affiliated with the Eastern College Athletic Conference, a consortium of over 300 colleges in the eastern United States. This relationship ended in 2004; however the ECAC abbreviation was retained in the name of the hockey conference. ECAC Hockey is the only ice hockey conference with identical memberships in both its women's and men's divisions.

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    How Ivy League
    Connects To ECAC Hockey

    • In some sports, Ivy teams actually compete as members of another league, the Ivy championship being decided by isolating the members' records in play against each other; for example, the six league members who participate in ice hockey do so as members of ECAC Hockey, but an Ivy champion is extrapolated each year. from Ivy League

    • The six Ivy League universities with Division I ice hockey programs are all members of ECAC Hockey. from ECAC Hockey

    • The league is considered the predecessor to the Ivy League and ECAC Hockey. from Yale Bulldogs men's ice hockey

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    • The Bulldogs compete in the Ivy League and the ECAC Hockey League (ECACHL) and play their home games at Ingalls Rink, also called the Yale Whale. from Yale Bulldogs men's ice hockey

    • The team competes in the ECAC Hockey League (ECACHL); in addition the Ivy League also crowns a champion for its members that field varsity ice hockey. from Yale Bulldogs

    • Dartmouth's teams compete in the Ivy League conference of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I, as well as in the ECAC Hockey conference. from Dartmouth Big Green

    • While another D-I all-sports conference, the Ivy League, recognizes ice hockey champions for both sexes, it does not directly sponsor the sport; it instead uses the results of regular-season ECAC Hockey matches involving two Ivy League schools to extrapolate an Ivy champion (all six Ivy League schools that sponsor varsity hockey compete in ECAC Hockey). from Division I (NCAA)

    • The team won the ECAC regular season crown in 2006 and the Ivy League title 15 times (1934, 1943, 1943, 1944, 1945, 1946, 1957, 1948, 1949, 1959, 1960, 1964, 1979, 1980 & 2007). from Dartmouth Big Green men's ice hockey

    • He was named the Ivy League rookie of the year, and was a finalist for the ECAC rookie of the year. from Louis Leblanc

    • Yale competes in the ECAC Hockey League (ECACHL), along with Ivy League foes Harvard, Princeton, Cornell, Dartmouth and Brown. from Yale Bulldogs women's ice hockey

    • An NCAA Division I institution, Cornell is a member of the Ivy League and ECAC Hockey and competes in the Eastern College Athletic Conference (ECAC), the largest athletic conference in North America. from Cornell University

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      Columbia Lions football The Columbia Lions football program is the intercollegiate American football team for Columbia University located…
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      The Columbia Lions football program is the intercollegiate American football team for Columbia University located in the U.S. state of New York. The team competes in the NCAA Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) and are members of the Ivy League. Columbia played in what is generally regarded as the fourth college football game in November 1870. The team plays its home games at the 17,000 seat Wien Stadium in Manhattan, New York. The Lions are coached by Pete Mangurian.

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    Connects To Columbia Lions football

    • One day in the sports room at the Tribune, the merits of Fordham's football team were being compared to those of Princeton and Columbia. from Ivy League

    • The team competes in the NCAA Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) and are members of the Ivy League. from Columbia Lions football

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      Brown University Brown University is a private Ivy League research university in Providence, Rhode Island.Founded in 1764 prior to…
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      Brown University is a private Ivy League research university in Providence, Rhode Island.
      Founded in 1764 prior to American independence from the British Empire as the College in the English Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, Brown is the third oldest institution of higher education in New England and seventh oldest in the United States.…

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      Brown University is a private Ivy League research university in Providence, Rhode Island.
      Founded in 1764 prior to American independence from the British Empire as the College in the English Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, Brown is the third oldest institution of higher education in New England and seventh oldest in the United States. The university consists of The College, Graduate School, Alpert Medical School, the School of Engineering, and the Brown University School of Public Health. Brown's international programs are organized through the Watson Institute for International Studies.
      Brown accepts 8.6% of undergraduate applicants, placing it among the world's most selective universities, and was the first college in America to accept students regardless of religious affiliation. The New Curriculum, instituted in 1969, eliminated distribution requirements and allows any course to be taken on a satisfactory/no credit basis. In addition, there are no pluses or minuses in the letter grading system. The school has the oldest undergraduate engineering program in the Ivy League (1847). Pembroke College, Brown's women's college, merged with the university in 1971. While Brown is considered a small research university with 713 full-time faculty and 1,947 graduate students, five of its professors and two of its alumni have been honored as Nobel Laureates. The faculty added 100 new professors in the past 10 years under the Boldly Brown campaign.
      Completed concentrations of undergraduates by area are Social Sciences (42%), Humanities (26%), Life Sciences (17%), and the Physical Sciences (14%). Brown's main campus is located on College Hill on the East Side of Providence. Several of the buildings on the Brown campus from its founding 18th century period through the 20th century offer fine representation of the Georgian style of American colonial era architecture. The university's 37 varsity athletic teams are known as the Brown Bears. The school colors are seal brown, cardinal red, and white. Brown's mascot is the bear, which dates back to 1904. The costumed mascot named "Bruno" frequently makes appearances at athletic games. People associated with the University are known as Brunonians.

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    Connects To Brown University

    • Brown is a member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Ivy League athletic conference. from Brown University

    • Nonetheless, Edwards joined several others as an original fellow or trustee for the chartering of the College in the English Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations (the former name for Brown University), the first Baptist college in the original thirteen colonies, and now one of the Ivy League universities. from Brown University

    • Brown University is a private Ivy League research university in Providence, Rhode Island. from Brown University

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    • The eight institutions are Brown University, Columbia University, Cornell University, Dartmouth College, Harvard University, Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and Yale University. from Ivy League

    • Brown University, an Ivy League university and one of nine colonial colleges in the nation. from Providence, Rhode Island

    • Ruth Simmons (born Ruth Jean Stubblefield; July 3, 1945) was the 18th president of Brown University, the first black president of an Ivy League institution. from Ruth Simmons

    • The Brown University Band is the official band of Brown University. Like all Ivy League bands except Cornell's, it is a scatter band. from Brown University Band

    • The is the engineering school at Brown University, a private Ivy League research university located in Providence, Rhode Island. from Brown University School of Engineering

    • Since the 1960s, the Ivy League has actively recruited blacks who now play prominent roles in each of its institutions, including faculty holding endowed professorships, head athletic coaches, deans, and one president, Ruth Simmons of Brown University. From 1967 to 1976, black enrollment in Ivy League colleges rose from 2.3% to 6.3%. from Black Ivy League

    • Seven of the nine colonial colleges are part of the Ivy League athletic conference: Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Penn, Columbia, Brown, and Dartmouth. from List of Colonial Colleges

    • The eight-institution athletic league to which Columbia University belongs, the Ivy League, also includes Brown University, Cornell University, Dartmouth College, Harvard University, University of Pennsylvania, Princeton University, and Yale University. from Columbia Lions

    • Woodson attended Brown University and was a four-year letterman in lacrosse He was a two-time All-Ivy League selection and a two-time All-New England selection. from Chazz Woodson

    • The Brown University Bears compete in the Ivy League, the Bryant University Bulldogs compete in the Northeast Conference, the Providence College Friars compete in the Big East Conference and the University of Rhode Island Rams compete in the Atlantic-10 Conference. from Rhode Island

    • In 1764, Edwards joined The Reverend James Manning, The Reverend Ezra Stiles, the Reverend Isaac Backus, the Reverend John Gano, the Reverend Samuel Stillman, William Ellery, and former Royal Governors Stephen Hopkins and Samuel Ward among several others as an original fellow or trustee for the chartering of the College in the English Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations (the former name for Brown University), the first Baptist college in the original thirteen colonies and one of the Ivy League universities. from Morgan Edwards

    • After graduating from Hebron Academy he attended Brown University where he finished with an Ivy League record 251 receptions for 3,850 yards and 40 touchdowns, and was voted Ivy League player of the year in 1997 — when he caught 74 passes for an Ivy League-record 1,434 yards and 15 touchdowns. from Sean Morey (American football)

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      Sprint football Sprint football, formerly called lightweight football, is a varsity sport played by United States colleges and…
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      Sprint football, formerly called lightweight football, is a varsity sport played by United States colleges and universities, under rules similar to American football. The sport is currently governed by the Collegiate Sprint Football League.…

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      Sprint football, formerly called lightweight football, is a varsity sport played by United States colleges and universities, under rules similar to American football. The sport is currently governed by the Collegiate Sprint Football League.
      Unlike conventional collegiate football which places a premium on body weight and strength, sprint football emphasizes speed and agility. Players must maintain a weight of 172 lbs or less and a minimum of 5% body fat to be eligible to play.

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    How Ivy League
    Connects To Sprint football

    • In addition to varsity football, Penn, Princeton and Cornell also field teams in the eight-team Collegiate Sprint Football League, in which all players must weight 172 pounds or less. from Ivy League

    • As of 2013, there are eight teams in the CSFL; of the eight, five are private universities (three being schools in the Ivy League, and one being a for-profit institution ) and two are national military academies; currently Mansfield University of Pennsylvania is the only state university or college playing sprint football. from Sprint football

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      Jesuit Ivy "Jesuit Ivy" is the title of a commencement speech delivered at Boston College, a Jesuit university in Chestnut…
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      "Jesuit Ivy" is the title of a commencement speech delivered at Boston College, a Jesuit university in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, United States. The term was coined in a 1956 commencement address by then-Massachusetts Senator John F. Kennedy. Speaking at the Jesuit university, he was likely making reference to the Ivy League, an athletic conference established…

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      "Jesuit Ivy" is the title of a commencement speech delivered at Boston College, a Jesuit university in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, United States. The term was coined in a 1956 commencement address by then-Massachusetts Senator John F. Kennedy. Speaking at the Jesuit university, he was likely making reference to the Ivy League, an athletic conference established in 1954. The term "Jesuit Ivy" was somewhat of a contradiction in terms. The Ivy League's members were generally Protestant-founded institutions; Boston College had itself been founded in part because Catholics were being denied admission to Harvard University in the nineteenth century.[citation needed] The nickname suggested both Boston College's rising stature and the declining prevalence of discrimination at elite American universities. Kennedy, a Catholic whose family were longtime Boston College benefactors, graduated from Harvard in 1940; as did his father in 1912, and his brothers Joe Jr, Robert and Edward in 1938, 1948 and 1956 respectively.
      The term has been used as a nickname for the school.

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    How Ivy League
    Connects To Jesuit Ivy

    • Jesuit Ivy—complementary use of Ivy to characterize Boston College. from Ivy League

    • Speaking at the Jesuit university, he was likely making reference to the Ivy League, an athletic conference established in 1954. from Jesuit Ivy

    • Recent graduates attend top-tier colleges and universities, including the Ivy League, "Little Ivies", and Jesuit colleges and universities. from Loyola School (New York City)

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      Rowing Association of American Colleges The Rowing Association of American Colleges (1870 to 1894) is considered to be the very first collegiate athletic…
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      The Rowing Association of American Colleges (1870 to 1894) is considered to be the very first collegiate athletic organization in the country. Upon organization by the captains of the leading crews of the day, they devised a primary rule of eligibility: that only undergraduate students should be eligible to represent their college in the regatta. To this day, despite numerous amendments and additions, this rule remains the very foundation of the NCAA rules of eligibility.

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    How Ivy League
    Connects To Rowing Association of American Colleges

    • The first formal athletic league involving eventual Ivy League schools (or any US colleges, for that matter) was created in 1870 with the formation of the Rowing Association of American Colleges. from Ivy League

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      The Cornell Daily Sun The Cornell Daily Sun is an independent daily newspaper published in Ithaca, New York by students at Cornell…
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      The Cornell Daily Sun is an independent daily newspaper published in Ithaca, New York by students at Cornell University and hired employees.
      The Sun is staffed entirely by Cornell students, aside from a few full-time production and business positions, and is fully independent of the university. It operates out of its own building in downtown Ithaca. The Sun is the best college newspaper in the United States, according to The Princeton Review.…

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      The Cornell Daily Sun is an independent daily newspaper published in Ithaca, New York by students at Cornell University and hired employees.
      The Sun features coverage of the university and its environs as well as stories from the Associated Press and UWIRE. It prints on weekdays when the university is open for academic instruction as a tabloid-sized daily. In addition to these regular issues, The Sun publishes a graduation issue and a freshman issue, which is mailed to incoming Cornell freshmen before their first semester. The paper is free on campus and online.
      The Sun is staffed entirely by Cornell students, aside from a few full-time production and business positions, and is fully independent of the university. It operates out of its own building in downtown Ithaca. The Sun is the best college newspaper in the United States, according to The Princeton Review.

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    How Ivy League
    Connects To The Cornell Daily Sun

    • Within a year of this statement and having held month-long discussions about the proposal, on December 3, 1936, the idea of "the formation of an Ivy League" gained enough traction among the undergraduate bodies of the universities that the Columbia Daily Spectator, The Cornell Daily Sun, The Dartmouth, The Harvard Crimson, The Daily Pennsylvanian, The Daily Princetonian and the Yale Daily News would simultaneously run an editorial entitled "Now Is the Time", encouraging the seven universities to form the league in an effort to preserve the ideals of athletics. from Ivy League

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      Big Three (colleges) The Big Three is a historical term used in the United States to refer to Harvard, Yale, and Princeton. The phrase…
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      The Big Three is a historical term used in the United States to refer to Harvard, Yale, and Princeton. The phrase Big Three originated in the 1880s, when these three colleges dominated college football. High schools' college admissions counselors and colleges' admissions guides sometimes use the initialism HYP to refer to these colleges. In the…

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      The Big Three is a historical term used in the United States to refer to Harvard, Yale, and Princeton. The phrase Big Three originated in the 1880s, when these three colleges dominated college football. High schools' college admissions counselors and colleges' admissions guides sometimes use the initialism HYP to refer to these colleges. In the early 1900s, these schools formed a sports compact that predates the Ivy League. The schools continue to refer to their intercollegiate competitions as "Big Three" or "Harvard-Yale-Princeton" meets. These three universities are considered to be among the most prestigious colleges in America.

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    Connects To Big Three (colleges)

    • The University of Pennsylvania was fourth and the other Ivy League members had far fewer, below such schools as Trinity College and the University of Virginia. from Big Three (colleges)

    • In the early 1900s, these schools formed a sports compact that predates the Ivy League. from Big Three (colleges)

    1. 32
      Princeton University Princeton University is a private Ivy League research university in Princeton, New Jersey.Founded in 1746 in…
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      Princeton University is a private Ivy League research university in Princeton, New Jersey.
      Founded in 1746 in Elizabeth as the College of New Jersey, Princeton is one of the nine Colonial Colleges established before the American Revolution as well as the fourth chartered institution of higher education in the American colonies. The institution moved to Newark…

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      Princeton University is a private Ivy League research university in Princeton, New Jersey.
      Founded in 1746 in Elizabeth as the College of New Jersey, Princeton is one of the nine Colonial Colleges established before the American Revolution as well as the fourth chartered institution of higher education in the American colonies. The institution moved to Newark in 1747, then to the current site nine years later where it was renamed as a University in 1896. The present-day College of New Jersey in nearby Ewing Township, New Jersey, is an unrelated institution. Princeton had close ties to the Presbyterian Church, but has never been affiliated with any denomination and today imposes no religious requirements on its students.
      Princeton provides undergraduate and graduate instruction in the humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, and engineering. It does not have schools of medicine, law, divinity, education, or business, but it offers professional degrees through the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, the School of Engineering and Applied Science, the School of Architecture and the Bendheim Center for Finance. The university has ties with the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton Theological Seminary, and the Westminster Choir College of Rider University. Princeton has been associated with 36 Nobel laureates, 17 National Medal of Science winners, two Abel Prize winners, five Fields Medalists, nine Turing Award laureates, three National Humanities Medal recipients and 201 Rhodes Scholars.
      By endowment per student, Princeton is the wealthiest school in the world.

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    How Ivy League
    Connects To Princeton University

    • In 1936, sportswriter John Kieran noted that student editors at Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Cornell, Columbia, Dartmouth, and Penn were advocating the formation of an athletic association. from Ivy League

    • However, it is clear that Harvard, Princeton, Yale and Columbia met on November 23, 1876 at the so-called Massasoit Convention to decide on uniform rules for the emerging game of American football, which rapidly spread. from Ivy League

    • The eight institutions are Brown University, Columbia University, Cornell University, Dartmouth College, Harvard University, Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and Yale University. from Ivy League

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    • Its athletic conference is the Ivy League. from Princeton University

    • Princeton University is a private Ivy League research university in Princeton, New Jersey. from Princeton University

    • Seven of the nine colonial colleges are part of the Ivy League athletic conference: Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Penn, Columbia, Brown, and Dartmouth. from List of Colonial Colleges

    • As a basketball player, he was a four-year starter at Princeton University, where he was captain of the Ivy League champion 1997–98 Princeton Tigers men's basketball team as well as a member of the 1995–96 and 1996–97 conference champions. from Mitch Henderson

    • Robinson, who stands 6' 6" and played at forward, was a two-time Ivy League Player of the Year at Princeton University, in 1981–1982 and 1982–1983, leading the league in field goal percentage both years. from Craig Robinson (basketball)

    • The eight-institution athletic league to which Columbia University belongs, the Ivy League, also includes Brown University, Cornell University, Dartmouth College, Harvard University, University of Pennsylvania, Princeton University, and Yale University. from Columbia Lions

    • He went on to study and play football at two Ivy League schools—Columbia University and Princeton University. from John Garrett (American football)

    • During his time at Princeton University, the team qualified for the NCAA Men's Lacrosse Championship all four years, reached the championship game twice, won the championship game once and won four Ivy League championships. from Ryan Boyle

    • He was a three-year letterwinner at Princeton University. Norman was named first-team All-Ivy League his final three seasons. from Dennis Norman

    • As a player, he was a two-time All-East and All-Ivy League fullback at Princeton University. from Homer Smith (American football)

    • By the 1960s, most of the other Ivy League institutions (Dartmouth, Yale, Princeton, Cornell, and Brown) had provosts (or equivalents), as did other private research universities such as the University of Chicago, Stanford University, Rice University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Tufts University, Emory University, Wake Forest University and Duke University. from Provost (education)

    • Cornell University and Princeton University – men's lacrosse rivalry dating to 1922; the two school have won at least a share of 42 Ivy League titles; Princeton holds a 35-30-2 advantage in the all-time series. from College rivalry

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      Field lacrosse Field Lacrosse, sometimes referred to as the "fastest sport on two feet," is a full contact outdoor men's sport…
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      Field Lacrosse, sometimes referred to as the "fastest sport on two feet," is a full contact outdoor men's sport played with ten players on each team. The sport originated among Native Americans, and the modern rules of field lacrosse were initially codified by Canadian William George Beers in 1867. Field lacrosse is one of three…

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      Field Lacrosse, sometimes referred to as the "fastest sport on two feet," is a full contact outdoor men's sport played with ten players on each team. The sport originated among Native Americans, and the modern rules of field lacrosse were initially codified by Canadian William George Beers in 1867. Field lacrosse is one of three major versions of lacrosse played internationally. The other versions, women's lacrosse (established in the 1890s) and box lacrosse (which originated in the 1930s), are played under significantly different rules.
      The object of the game is to use a long handled racket, known as a lacrosse stick or crosse, to catch, carry, and pass a solid rubber ball in an effort to score by ultimately hurling the ball into an opponent's goal. The triangular head of the lacrosse stick has a loose net strung into it that allows the player to hold the lacrosse ball. In addition to the lacrosse stick, players are required to wear a certain amount of protective equipment. Defensively the object is to keep the opposing team from scoring and to dispossess them of the ball through the use of stick checking and body contact. The rules limit the number of players in each part of the field and require the ball to be moved continuously towards the opposing goal.
      Lacrosse is governed internationally by the 31-member Federation of International Lacrosse, which sponsors the World Lacrosse Championships once every four years. A former Olympic sport, attempts by the international governing body to reinstate it to the Games has been hampered by insufficient international participation and by the existence of separate governing bodies for the men's and women's versions of the sport until 2008. Field lacrosse is played professionally in North America by the Major League Lacrosse. It is also played on a high amateur level by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States, the Australian Senior Lacrosse Championship series, and the Canadian University Field Lacrosse Association.

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    How Ivy League
    Connects To Field lacrosse

    • In men's lacrosse, Cornell and Princeton are perennial rivals, and they are the only two Ivy League teams to have won the NCAA tournament. from Ivy League

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      U.S. News & World Report U.S. News & World Report is an American news magazine published from Washington, D.C. Along with Time and…
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      U.S. News & World Report is an American news magazine published from Washington, D.C. Along with Time and Newsweek, it was for many years a leading news weekly, focusing more than its counterparts on political, economic, health and education stories. In recent years, it is now known for its ranking system and annual reports on American colleges, graduate schools and hospitals.…

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      U.S. News & World Report is an American news magazine published from Washington, D.C. Along with Time and Newsweek, it was for many years a leading news weekly, focusing more than its counterparts on political, economic, health and education stories. In recent years, it is now known for its ranking system and annual reports on American colleges, graduate schools and hospitals.
      Starting in June 2008, the magazine reduced its publication frequency in three steps. It switched in June 2008 from weekly to biweekly. In November 2008 it decreased to monthly. In November 2010, it was reported that U.S News & World Report would be switched to an online-only format, effective after it published its December issue, with the exception of print publishing special issues on colleges, hospitals, and personal finance.

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    How Ivy League
    Connects To U.S. News & World Report

    • All eight universities place in the top twenty of the U.S. News & World Report 2014 university rankings, including the top four schools and six of the top ten. from Ivy League

    • The Geisel School of Medicine is one of seven Ivy League medical schools and is ranked as a "top medical school" by U.S. News & World Report for both primary care and biomedical research. Dartmouth's medical school has numerous clinical partners, including Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, White River Junction Veterans Administration Medical Center, California Pacific Medical Center, and Manchester Veterans Administration Medical Center. from Geisel School of Medicine

    • Brown Alpert Medical School is one of seven Ivy League medical schools and is currently ranked 24th for primary care education and 31st for research by the 2014 U.S. News and World Report rankings. from Alpert Medical School

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    • It is ranked 15th among the best engineering graduate schools by U.S. News & World Report, and second within the Ivy League behind Cornell. from Columbia School of Engineering and Applied Science

    • The New York metropolitan area is home to many prestigious institutions of higher education. Three Ivy League universities (Columbia University in Manhattan, Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey, and Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut - all ranked amongst the top 4 U.S. national universities as per U.S. News & World Report as of 2013 ) reside in the region, as well as New York University and The Rockefeller University, both located in Manhattan; all of the above have been ranked amongst the top 35 universities in the world. from New York metropolitan area

    • Many of the students who have taken AP courses move on to campuses of the University of California, with some top students achieving admission to Ivy League universities or other universities in the Top 25, as ranked by U.S. News & World Report. from John Marshall High School (Los Angeles)

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      The Harvard Crimson The Harvard Crimson, the daily student newspaper of Harvard University, was founded in 1873. It is the only daily…
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      The Harvard Crimson, the daily student newspaper of Harvard University, was founded in 1873. It is the only daily newspaper in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and is run entirely by Harvard College undergraduates. Many Crimson alumni have gone on to careers in journalism, and some have won Pulitzer Prizes.

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    How Ivy League
    Connects To The Harvard Crimson

    • Within a year of this statement and having held month-long discussions about the proposal, on December 3, 1936, the idea of "the formation of an Ivy League" gained enough traction among the undergraduate bodies of the universities that the Columbia Daily Spectator, The Cornell Daily Sun, The Dartmouth, The Harvard Crimson, The Daily Pennsylvanian, The Daily Princetonian and the Yale Daily News would simultaneously run an editorial entitled "Now Is the Time", encouraging the seven universities to form the league in an effort to preserve the ideals of athletics. from Ivy League

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      College rowing (United States) Rowing is one of the oldest intercollegiate sports in the United States. However, rowers comprise only 2.2% of…
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      Rowing is one of the oldest intercollegiate sports in the United States. However, rowers comprise only 2.2% of total college athletes. This may be in part because of the status of rowing as an amateur sport and because not all universities have access to suitable bodies of water. In the 2002-03 school year there were 1,712 male and 6,690 female collegiate rowers.

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    How Ivy League
    Connects To College rowing (United States)

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    • However, on the east coast, most Ivy League and EARC schools have excellent, well-funded men's lightweight teams; the lightweight men's events at Eastern Sprints and the Intercollegiate Rowing Association Championship (IRAs) are fiercely contested. from College rowing (United States)

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      Harvard–Yale Regatta The Harvard–Yale Regatta or Harvard-Yale Boat Race (often abbreviated The Race) is an annual rowing race between…
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      The Harvard–Yale Regatta or Harvard-Yale Boat Race (often abbreviated The Race) is an annual rowing race between the men's heavyweight rowing crews of Harvard University and Yale University. First contested in 1852, it has been held annually since 1859 except during major wars fought by the United States, The Race is America's oldest collegiate athletic competition, pre-dating The Game by 23 years.…

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      The Harvard–Yale Regatta or Harvard-Yale Boat Race (often abbreviated The Race) is an annual rowing race between the men's heavyweight rowing crews of Harvard University and Yale University. First contested in 1852, it has been held annually since 1859 except during major wars fought by the United States, The Race is America's oldest collegiate athletic competition, pre-dating The Game by 23 years.
      Originally rowed on Lake Winnipesaukee, New Hampshire, it has since moved to the Thames River, New London, Connecticut. Although other locations for the race have included the Connecticut River at Springfield, Massachusetts, and Lake Quinsigamond at Worcester, Massachusetts, the Thames has hosted The Race on all but five occasions since 1878 and both teams have erected permanent training camps on the Thames at Gales Ferry for Yale and at Red Top for Harvard.
      The race has been exclusively between Harvard and Yale except for 1897 when the race was held as part of a three boat race with Cornell on the Hudson River at Poughkeepsie, New York, where, although it lost to Cornell, Yale was deemed the winner of the Harvard–Yale race.

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    How Ivy League
    Connects To Harvard–Yale Regatta

    • Harvard and Yale are football and crew rivals although the competition has become unbalanced; Harvard has won all but one of the last 11 football games and all but one of the last 13 crew races. from Ivy League

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      Walter Camp Walter Chauncey Camp (April 7, 1859 – March 14, 1925) was an American football player, coach, and sports writer…
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      Walter Chauncey Camp (April 7, 1859 – March 14, 1925) was an American football player, coach, and sports writer known as the "Father of American Football". He invented the sport's line of scrimmage and the system of downs. With John Heisman, Amos Alonzo Stagg, Pop Warner, Fielding H. Yost, and George Halas, Camp was one…

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      Walter Chauncey Camp (April 7, 1859 – March 14, 1925) was an American football player, coach, and sports writer known as the "Father of American Football". He invented the sport's line of scrimmage and the system of downs. With John Heisman, Amos Alonzo Stagg, Pop Warner, Fielding H. Yost, and George Halas, Camp was one of the most accomplished persons in the early history of American football. He played college football at Yale College from 1876 to 1882, after which he briefly studied at Yale School of Medicine. Camp served as the head football coach at Yale from 1888 to 1892 before moving to Stanford University, where he coached in December 1892 and in 1894 and 1895. Camp's Yale teams of 1888, 1891, and 1892 have been recognized as national champions. Camp was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1951.

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    How Ivy League
    Connects To Walter Camp

    • Yale, whose coach Walter Camp was the "Father of American Football," held on to its place as the all-time wins leader in college football throughout the entire 20th century, but was finally passed by Michigan on November 10, 2001. from Ivy League

    • As the sport transformed at the hands of figures like John Heisman and Yale’s Walter Camp and more schools began competing, Princeton and the rest of the Ivy League slowly faded out of national championship contention. from Princeton Tigers football

    • He was among the first non-Ivy League players to be named to Walter Camp's All-America team, and was selected as an All-American in both 1903 and 1904. from Tom Thorp

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    • William Thomas "Mother" Dunn (May 13, 1881 in Youngstown, Ohio – November 17, 1962 on Maui) was a collegiate American football player, who played linebacker and center for Penn State University. Dunn captained the 1906 Penn State Nittany Lions football team and that year became the first player outside of the Ivy League to be selected as an All-American by Walter Camp. from William Thomas Dunn

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      NCAA Division I Rowing Championship The NCAA Division I Rowing Championship is a rowing championship held by the NCAA for Division I women's…
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      The NCAA Division I Rowing Championship is a rowing championship held by the NCAA for Division I women's heavyweight (or openweight) collegiate crews. It was first held in 1997. In 2002, the NCAA added championships for Division II and Division III. All races are 2,000 meters long. Men's rowing (both heavyweight and lightweight) and women's lightweight rowing are not part of the NCAA and have separate championships.

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    How Ivy League
    Connects To NCAA Division I Rowing Championship

    • Most recently, on the men's side, Harvard won the Intercollegiate Rowing Association Championships in 2003, 2004, 2005, and on the women's side Brown won the team championship in 2007, 2008 and 2011 NCAA Rowing Championships and Yale won the NCAA title for the I-eight event (the most elite event) in 2007, 2008 and 2010. from Ivy League

    • The women's team competes in the Ivy League (having left the Women's Sprints in 2011) to qualify for the women's national championship. from Dartmouth Big Green

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      Princeton Tigers football The Princeton Tigers football program represents Princeton University college football at the NCAA Division I…
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      The Princeton Tigers football program represents Princeton University college football at the NCAA Division I Football Championship Subdivision (formerly Division I-AA). Princeton’s football program -- along with the football program at nearby Rutgers University -- is the oldest in the world, these two schools having competed against each other in American football's first intercollegiate contest in 1869, and has a legacy that includes the most national championships of any college or university.

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    How Ivy League
    Connects To Princeton Tigers football

    • One day in the sports room at the Tribune, the merits of Fordham's football team were being compared to those of Princeton and Columbia. from Ivy League

    • When Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Harvard, Princeton, and Yale Universities, Dartmouth College, and the University of Pennsylvania formed the Ivy League athletic conference in 1955, conference rules prohibited post-season play in football. from Princeton Tigers football

    • As the sport transformed at the hands of figures like John Heisman and Yale’s Walter Camp and more schools began competing, Princeton and the rest of the Ivy League slowly faded out of national championship contention. from Princeton Tigers football

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    • Hawley reached the pinnacle of success in 1925, when he led Dartmouth to an undefeated 8–0 season, for which Dartmouth claims the national championship. Other than two national titles claimed by Princeton in the 1930s under Fritz Crisler, the 1925 Dartmouth national title is the last claimed by an Ivy League school. from Jesse Hawley (American football)

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      Boston College Boston College (BC) is a private Jesuit research university located in the village of Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts…
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      Boston College (BC) is a private Jesuit research university located in the village of Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, USA, located 6 miles (9.7 km) west of downtown Boston. It has 9,100 full-time undergraduates and almost 5,000 graduate students. The university's name reflects its early history as a liberal arts college and preparatory school (now Boston College…

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      Boston College (BC) is a private Jesuit research university located in the village of Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, USA, located 6 miles (9.7 km) west of downtown Boston. It has 9,100 full-time undergraduates and almost 5,000 graduate students. The university's name reflects its early history as a liberal arts college and preparatory school (now Boston College High School) in Boston's South End. It is a member of the 568 Group and the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities. Its main campus is a historic district and features some of the earliest examples of collegiate gothic architecture in North America.
      Boston College's undergraduate program is currently ranked 31st in the National Universities ranking by U.S. News & World Report. Boston College is categorized as a research university with high research activity by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Students at the university earned 21 Fulbright Awards in 2012, ranking the school eighth among American research institutions. At $1.809 billion, Boston College has the 41st largest university endowment in North America, and the largest endowment of all Jesuit colleges and universities.
      Boston College offers bachelor's degrees, master's degrees, and doctoral degrees through its nine schools and colleges: College of Arts & Sciences, Boston College Graduate School of Arts & Sciences, Carroll School of Management, Lynch School of Education, Connell School of Nursing, Boston College Graduate School of Social Work, Boston College Law School, Boston College School of Theology and Ministry, Woods College of Advancing Studies.
      Boston College sports teams are called the Eagles, and their colors are maroon and gold; the school mascot is Baldwin the Eagle. The Eagles compete in NCAA Division I as members of the Atlantic Coast Conference in all sports offered by the ACC. The men's and women's ice hockey teams compete in Hockey East. Boston College's men's ice hockey team is one of the most decorated programs in the nation, having won five national championships.

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    How Ivy League
    Connects To Boston College

    • Jesuit Ivy—complementary use of Ivy to characterize Boston College. from Ivy League

    • The college shares this ranking with all of the Ivy League universities, Georgetown University, the University of Notre Dame, Boston College, and others. from College of the Holy Cross

    • Graduates from SITHS matriculate to selective colleges such as the Ivy League schools, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, New York University, Duke University, University of Chicago, The Cooper Union, Stanford University, Carnegie Mellon University, Boston College, Villanova University, Johns Hopkins University, and the William E. Macaulay Honors College in rates higher than those of surrounding schools. from Staten Island Technical High School

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    • Four NCAA Division I members play their games in the city—Boston College (Atlantic Coast Conference), Boston University (Patriot League), Harvard University (Ivy League), and Northeastern University (Colonial Athletic Association). from Boston

    • Boston College fields teams in the nationally televised Atlantic Coast Conference, while Harvard University competes in the famed Ivy League. from Massachusetts

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      National Collegiate Athletic Association The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) is a non-profit association that regulates athletes of 1,281…
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      The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) is a non-profit association that regulates athletes of 1,281 institutions, conferences, organizations, and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States and Canada. It is headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana.…

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      The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) is a non-profit association that regulates athletes of 1,281 institutions, conferences, organizations, and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States and Canada. It is headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana.
      In August 1973, the current three-division setup of Division I, Division II, and Division III was adopted by the NCAA membership in a special convention. Under NCAA rules, Division I and Division II schools can offer scholarships to athletes for playing a sport. Division III schools may not offer any athletic scholarships. Generally, larger schools compete in Division I and smaller schools in II and III. Division I football was further divided into I-A and I-AA in 1978. Subsequently the term "Division I-AAA" was briefly added to delineate Division I schools which do not field a football program at all, but that term is no longer officially used by the NCAA. In 2006, Divisions I-A and I-AA were respectively renamed the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) and Football Championship Subdivision (FCS).

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    How Ivy League
    Connects To National Collegiate Athletic Association

    • In 1906, the organization that eventually became the National Collegiate Athletic Association was formed, primarily to formalize rules for the emerging sport of football. from Ivy League

    • The term became official after the formation of the NCAA Division I athletic conference in 1954. from Ivy League

    • Outside of the Ivy League, it is the most selective group of higher education institutions in NCAA Division I and has the highest student-athlete graduation rate for both the NCAA graduation success rate and the federal graduation rate. from Patriot League

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    • The school competes in the Ivy League in Division I of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). from Princeton Tigers men's basketball

    • The team currently competes in the Ivy League in Division I of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and play home games at the Lavietes Pavilion in Boston, Massachusetts. The team's last appearance in the NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament was in 2013, where they beat New Mexico in the second round in a 14 to 3 seed upset. from Harvard Crimson

    • Dartmouth's teams compete in the Ivy League conference of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I, as well as in the ECAC Hockey conference. from Dartmouth Big Green

    • Cornell participates in NCAA Division I as part of the Ivy League. from Cornell Big Red

    • The Ivy League Baseball Championship Series is the conference baseball championship of the NCAA Division I Ivy League. from Ivy League Baseball Championship Series

    • Since 1961, Brown has won seven Ivy League championships and has made 11 NCAA Men's Lacrosse Championship tournament appearances, including nine NCAA Quarterfinal appearances. from Brown Bears men's lacrosse

    • The team is a member of the Ivy League, which is part of the National Collegiate Athletic Association's Division I. from Cornell Big Red baseball

    • The Cornell Big Red football team represents Cornell University in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) college football competition as a member of the Ivy League. from Cornell Big Red football

    • It is home to the Columbia Lions baseball team of the NCAA Division I Ivy League. from Robertson Field at Satow Stadium

    • The team currently competes in the Ivy League in Division I of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and play home games at the Lavietes Pavilion in Boston, Massachusetts. The team's last appearance in the NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament was in 2013, where Harvard upset 3-seed New Mexico 68-62 for the university's first-ever NCAA tournament win. from Harvard Crimson men's basketball

    • He starred as a member of the Princeton Tigers men's lacrosse team from 1995 through 1998, where he earned National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) lacrosse attackman of the year award, three United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association (USILA) All-American recognitions, four Ivy League championships, three national championships, an Ivy League Player of the Year award and an NCAA tournament most outstanding player award. from Jon Hess (lacrosse)

    • The Penn Quakers have competed in the Ivy League since its inaugural season of 1956, and are currently a Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). from Penn Quakers football

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      Ivy stone An ivy stone or Ivy Day stone is a class memorial stone unveiled at annual Ivy Day celebrations at older colleges…
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      An ivy stone or Ivy Day stone is a class memorial stone unveiled at annual Ivy Day celebrations at older colleges in the Northeastern United States.

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    How Ivy League
    Connects To Ivy stone

    • At Penn, graduating seniors started the custom of planting ivy at a university building each spring in 1873 and that practice was formally designated as "Ivy Day" in 1874. from Ivy League

    • Ivy stones are often placed on the sides of academic buildings at several American universities and colleges that are in the Ivy League or considered Little Ivies. from Ivy stone

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      University of Pennsylvania The University of Pennsylvania (commonly referred to as Penn or UPenn) is an American private Ivy League research…
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      The University of Pennsylvania (commonly referred to as Penn or UPenn) is an American private Ivy League research university located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Incorporated as The Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania, Penn is one of 14 founding members of the Association of American Universities and one of the nine original Colonial Colleges.…

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      The University of Pennsylvania (commonly referred to as Penn or UPenn) is an American private Ivy League research university located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Incorporated as The Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania, Penn is one of 14 founding members of the Association of American Universities and one of the nine original Colonial Colleges.
      Benjamin Franklin, Penn's founder, advocated an educational program that focused as much on practical education for commerce and public service as on the classics and theology. Penn was one of the first academic institutions to follow a multidisciplinary model pioneered by several European universities, concentrating multiple "faculties" (e.g., theology, classics, medicine) into one institution. It was also home to many other educational innovations. The first school of medicine in North America (Perelman School of Medicine, 1765), the first collegiate business school (Wharton, 1881) and the first student union (Houston Hall, 1896) were all born at Penn.
      Penn offers a broad range of academic departments, an extensive research enterprise and a number of community outreach and public service programs. It is particularly well known for its medical school, dental school, design school, school of business, law school, communications school, nursing school, veterinary school, its social sciences and humanities programs, as well as its biomedical teaching and research capabilities. Its undergraduate programs are also among the most selective in the country (approximately 10% acceptance rate). One of Penn's most well known academic qualities is its emphasis on interdisciplinary education, which it promotes through numerous joint degree programs, research centers and professorships, a unified campus, and the ability for students to take classes from any of Penn's schools (the "One University Policy").
      All of Penn's schools exhibit very high research activity. Penn is consistently ranked among the top research universities in the world, for both quality and quantity of research. In fiscal year 2011, Penn topped the Ivy League in academic research spending with an $814 million budget, involving some 4,000 faculty, 1,100 postdoctoral fellows and 5,400 support staff/graduate assistants. As one of the most active and prolific research institutions, Penn is associated with several important innovations and discoveries in many fields of science and the humanities. Among them are the first general purpose electronic computer (ENIAC), the Rubella and Hepatitis B vaccines, Retin-A, cognitive therapy, conjoint analysis and others.
      Penn's academic and research programs are led by a large and highly productive faculty. Nine Penn faculty members or graduates have won a Nobel Prize in the last ten years. Over its long history the university has also produced many distinguished alumni. These include twelve heads of state (including one U.S. President), three United States Supreme Court justices, and supreme court justices of other states, founders of technology companies, international law firms and global financial institutions, university presidents, and eighteen living billionaires.

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    How Ivy League
    Connects To University of Pennsylvania

    • In 1936, sportswriter John Kieran noted that student editors at Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Cornell, Columbia, Dartmouth, and Penn were advocating the formation of an athletic association. from Ivy League

    • The eight institutions are Brown University, Columbia University, Cornell University, Dartmouth College, Harvard University, Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and Yale University. from Ivy League

    • They participate in the Ivy League and Division I (Division I FCS for football) in the NCAA. from University of Pennsylvania

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    • The University of Pennsylvania (commonly referred to as Penn or UPenn) is an American private Ivy League research university located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. from University of Pennsylvania

    • The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania (also known as the Wharton School, the Wharton School of Business, or Wharton) is the business school of the University of Pennsylvania, a private Ivy League university located in Philadelphia. from Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania

    • Seven of the nine colonial colleges are part of the Ivy League athletic conference: Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Penn, Columbia, Brown, and Dartmouth. from List of Colonial Colleges

    • From 1994 to 2004, Rodin served as the 7th permanent president of the University of Pennsylvania, and the first permanent female president of an Ivy League university. from Judith Rodin

    • Onyekwe played college basketball at the University of Pennsylvania where he became just the second Ivy League player ever to be named the Ivy League Player of the Year two times (2002, 2003). from Ugonna Onyekwe

    • Rosen, a point guard, played collegiately at the University of Pennsylvania, where he was an All-American and Ivy League player of the year. from Zack Rosen

    • The University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine (commonly referred to as Penn Dental Medicine) is the dental school of the University of Pennsylvania (Penn), an Ivy League university located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. from University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine

    • The eight-institution athletic league to which Columbia University belongs, the Ivy League, also includes Brown University, Cornell University, Dartmouth College, Harvard University, University of Pennsylvania, Princeton University, and Yale University. from Columbia Lions

    • Teaching at the University of Pennsylvania from 1947 to 1967, he was an American Professor of philosophy in the Ivy League. from William Fontaine

    • The Ivy League was the premier conference in college football at that time, so Iowa hired former Pennsylvania star A.E. Bull as their head coach for the 1896 season. from Frank Kinney Holbrook

    • After graduating from Germantown Academy he then spent a year at Choate Rosemary Hall, a top boarding school in Wallingford, Connecticut before attending the University of Pennsylvania as an undergraduate where he was a Dean's List student and Defensive Back on the Ivy League Champion Football team. from Michael F. Gerber

    • Upon his graduation from Luther South High School, he attended the University of Pennsylvania, an Ivy League school, where he majored in Communications with a minor in Sociology. from Naledge

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      College and university rankings College and university rankings are rankings of institutions in higher education, ordered by combinations of…
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      College and university rankings are rankings of institutions in higher education, ordered by combinations of factors. In addition to entire institutions, specific programs, departments, and schools are ranked. Rankings are conducted by magazines, newspapers, websites, governments and academics. Various rankings consider measures of wealth, research excellence and/or influence, student choices, eventual success and/or demographics, on…

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      College and university rankings are rankings of institutions in higher education, ordered by combinations of factors. In addition to entire institutions, specific programs, departments, and schools are ranked. Rankings are conducted by magazines, newspapers, websites, governments and academics. Various rankings consider measures of wealth, research excellence and/or influence, student choices, eventual success and/or demographics, on surveys, and others. Some rankings evaluate institutions within a single country, while others assess institutions worldwide. The subject has produced much debate about rankings' usefulness and accuracy. The expanding diversity in rating methodologies and accompanying criticisms of each indicate the lack of consensus in the field. For rankings of United States universities in particular, see Rankings of universities in the United States.

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    How Ivy League
    Connects To College and university rankings

    • All eight universities place in the top twenty of the U.S. News & World Report 2014 university rankings, including the top four schools and six of the top ten. from Ivy League

    • It disregards subjective measures such as public reputation, which causes some Ivy League and other highly reputable colleges to score lower than in other lists. from College and university rankings

    • The Geisel School of Medicine is one of seven Ivy League medical schools and is ranked as a "top medical school" by U.S. News & World Report for both primary care and biomedical research. Dartmouth's medical school has numerous clinical partners, including Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, White River Junction Veterans Administration Medical Center, California Pacific Medical Center, and Manchester Veterans Administration Medical Center. from Geisel School of Medicine

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    • Its emphasis on education is demonstrated by a small student body and 5:1 student-faculty ratio, among the lowest in the top American universities including the Ivy League. from Rice University

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      Yale Blue Yale Blue is the dark azure color used in association with Yale University.
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      Yale Blue is the dark azure color used in association with Yale University.

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    How Ivy League
    Connects To Yale Blue

    • The founders of the University of California came from Yale, hence the school colors of University of California are Yale Blue and California Gold. from Ivy League

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      Yale Daily News The Yale Daily News is an independent student newspaper published by Yale University students in New Haven…
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      The Yale Daily News is an independent student newspaper published by Yale University students in New Haven, Connecticut since January 28, 1878. The newspaper's first editors wrote:

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    How Ivy League
    Connects To Yale Daily News

    • Within a year of this statement and having held month-long discussions about the proposal, on December 3, 1936, the idea of "the formation of an Ivy League" gained enough traction among the undergraduate bodies of the universities that the Columbia Daily Spectator, The Cornell Daily Sun, The Dartmouth, The Harvard Crimson, The Daily Pennsylvanian, The Daily Princetonian and the Yale Daily News would simultaneously run an editorial entitled "Now Is the Time", encouraging the seven universities to form the league in an effort to preserve the ideals of athletics. from Ivy League

    1. 48
      Lehigh University Lehigh University is an American private research university located in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. It was established…
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      Lehigh University is an American private research university located in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. It was established in 1865 by businessman Asa Packer and has grown to include studies in a wide variety of disciplines. As of 2012, the university comprises 4,883 undergraduate students and 2,187 graduate students. Lehigh is considered one of the twenty-four Hidden Ivies in the Northeastern United States.…

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      Lehigh University is an American private research university located in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. It was established in 1865 by businessman Asa Packer and has grown to include studies in a wide variety of disciplines. As of 2012, the university comprises 4,883 undergraduate students and 2,187 graduate students. Lehigh is considered one of the twenty-four Hidden Ivies in the Northeastern United States.
      Lehigh is ranked 12th in the nation, according to The Wall Street Journal, in college return on investment (ROI). The university has over 680 faculty members; awards and honors recognizing Lehigh faculty and alumni include the Nobel Prize, the Pulitzer Prize, Fulbright Fellowship, and membership in the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences.
      The university has four colleges: the P.C. Rossin College of Engineering and Applied Science, the College of Arts and Sciences, the College of Business and Economics, and the College of Education. The College of Arts and Sciences is the largest college today, home to roughly 40% percent of the university's students. The university offers a variety of degrees, including Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Master of Arts, Master of Science, Master of Business Administration, Master of Engineering, Master of Education, and Doctor of Philosophy.

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    How Ivy League
    Connects To Lehigh University

    • The Yale-Princeton series is the nation's second longest, exceeded only by "The Rivalry" between Lehigh and Lafayette, which began later in 1884 but included two or three games in each of 17 early seasons. from Ivy League

    • Lehigh's business curriculum was unique in that it combined both the abstract emphasis on Economics seen in the Ivy League with the practical skills of management seen in more common business administration degrees given by other universities. from Lehigh University

    • During his presidency, he and Peter Likins of Lehigh University were the two college presidents contacted by the Ivy League in the first stage of the formation of the Patriot League during the early-1980s. from John E. Brooks

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    • Canisius (MAAC), Lehigh (Patriot League), Loyola (ECAC), Massachusetts (CAA), Stony Brook (America East), Syracuse (Big East), and Yale (Ivy League), earned an automatic bid into the tournament by winning their respective conference tournaments. from 2012 NCAA Division I Men's Lacrosse Championship

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      2009 NCAA Division I Men's Lacrosse Championship The 2009 NCAA Division I Men's Lacrosse Tournament was held from May 9 through May 25, 2009. This was the 39th…
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      The 2009 NCAA Division I Men's Lacrosse Tournament was held from May 9 through May 25, 2009. This was the 39th annual Division I NCAA Men's Lacrosse Championship tournament. Sixteen NCAA Division I college men's lacrosse teams met after having played their way through a regular season, and for some, a conference tournament, to play in the NCAA Tournament.…

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      The 2009 NCAA Division I Men's Lacrosse Tournament was held from May 9 through May 25, 2009. This was the 39th annual Division I NCAA Men's Lacrosse Championship tournament. Sixteen NCAA Division I college men's lacrosse teams met after having played their way through a regular season, and for some, a conference tournament, to play in the NCAA Tournament.
      The first round of the tournament was played on May 9 and 10 at the home fields of the seeded teams. The quarterfinals were held on May 16 and 17th on neutral site fields at Hofstra University (James M. Shuart Stadium) and the United States Naval Academy (Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium). The tournament culminated with the semifinals and final held on Memorial Day weekend at Gillette Stadium in Foxborough, Massachusetts. The tournament was won by Syracuse University who defeated Cornell University, 10–9, in overtime in front of 41,935 fans.

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    How Ivy League
    Connects To 2009 NCAA Division I Men's Lacrosse Championship

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      Columbia Daily Spectator Columbia Daily Spectator is the daily student newspaper of Columbia University. It is published at 112th and…
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      Columbia Daily Spectator is the daily student newspaper of Columbia University. It is published at 112th and Broadway in New York, New York. Founded in 1877, it is the oldest continuously operating college news daily in the nation after The Harvard Crimson, and has been legally independent of the university since 1962. It is printed…

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      Columbia Daily Spectator is the daily student newspaper of Columbia University. It is published at 112th and Broadway in New York, New York. Founded in 1877, it is the oldest continuously operating college news daily in the nation after The Harvard Crimson, and has been legally independent of the university since 1962. It is printed weekdays during the academic term. In addition to serving as a campus newspaper, the Spec, as it is commonly known, also reports the latest news of the surrounding Morningside Heights community. The paper is delivered each day to over 150 locations throughout the Morningside Heights neighborhood.

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    How Ivy League
    Connects To Columbia Daily Spectator

    • Within a year of this statement and having held month-long discussions about the proposal, on December 3, 1936, the idea of "the formation of an Ivy League" gained enough traction among the undergraduate bodies of the universities that the Columbia Daily Spectator, The Cornell Daily Sun, The Dartmouth, The Harvard Crimson, The Daily Pennsylvanian, The Daily Princetonian and the Yale Daily News would simultaneously run an editorial entitled "Now Is the Time", encouraging the seven universities to form the league in an effort to preserve the ideals of athletics. from Ivy League

    • They were the third Ivy League paper to do this, after the Harvard Crimson 's Sports Blog (December 2005) and The Daily Pennsylvanian 's TheBuzz (January 2006). from Columbia Daily Spectator

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