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Johnson solid
In geometry, a Johnson solid is a strictly convex polyhedron, which is not uniform (i.e., not a Platonic solid, Archimedean solid, prism or antiprism), and each face of which is a regular polygon. There is no requirement that each face must be the same polygon, or that the same polygons join around each vertex. An example of a Johnson solid is the square-based pyramid with equilateral sides (J1); it has 1 square face and 4 triangular faces. MORE
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