Show Less

Knitting is a method by which thread or yarn is used to create a cloth.
Knitted fabric consists of a number of consecutive rows of loops, called stitches. As each row progresses, a new loop is pulled through an existing loop. The active stitches are held on a needle until another loop can be passed through them. This process eventually results in a fabric, often used for blankets or garments.

Show More

Knitting may be done by hand or by machine. There exist numerous styles and methods of hand knitting.
Different types of yarns and needles may be used to achieve a plethora of knitted materials; these tools give the final piece a different colour, texture, weight, and/or integrity. Other factors that affect the end result include the needle's shape, thickness and malleability, as well as the yarn's fibre type, texture and twist.

    1. 1
      Crochet Crochet (English pronunciation: /kroʊˈʃeɪ/; French: [kʁɔʃɛ]) is a process of creating fabric from yarn, thread, or…
    1. 1

      Crochet (English pronunciation: /kroʊˈʃeɪ/; French: [kʁɔʃɛ]) is a process of creating fabric from yarn, thread, or other material strands using a crochet hook. The word is derived from the French word "crochet", meaning hook. Hooks can be made of materials such as metals, woods, or plastic and are commercially manufactured as well as produced by…

      SHOW MORE

      Crochet (English pronunciation: /kroʊˈʃeɪ/; French: [kʁɔʃɛ]) is a process of creating fabric from yarn, thread, or other material strands using a crochet hook. The word is derived from the French word "crochet", meaning hook. Hooks can be made of materials such as metals, woods, or plastic and are commercially manufactured as well as produced by artisans. Crocheting, like knitting, consists of pulling loops of material through other loops, but additionally incorporates wrapping the working material around the hook one or more times. Crochet differs from knitting in that only one stitch is active at one time (exceptions being Tunisian crochet and broomstick lace), stitches made with the same diameter of yarn are comparably taller, and a single crochet hook is used instead of two knitting needles. Additionally, crochet has its own system of symbols to represent stitch types.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To Crochet

    • Crocheting, like knitting, consists of pulling loops of material through other loops, but additionally incorporates wrapping the working material around the hook one or more times. from Crochet

    • There is also a technique of knitting with a crochet hook that has a cord attached to the end, to hold the stitches while they're being worked. from Knitting

    • Yarn is a long continuous length of interlocked fibres, suitable for use in the production of textiles, sewing, crocheting, knitting, weaving, embroidery, and ropemaking. from Yarn

    SHOW MORE
    • The purpose of plying singles is to strengthen them so that they do not break while knitting or crocheting them. from Plying

    • Construction methods such as sewing, knitting, crochet, and tailoring, as well as the tools employed (looms and sewing needles), techniques employed (quilting and pleating) and the objects made (carpets, hooked rugs, and coverlets) all fall under the category of textile arts. from Textile arts

    • It functions as an organizational tool for a variety of fiber arts including knitting, crocheting, spinning, and weaving. from Ravelry

    • Yarn weight refers to the thickness of yarn used by knitters, weavers, crocheters and other fiber artists. from Yarn weight

    • It is knitted or crocheted, often in geometric shapes. from Afghan (blanket)

    • Knitting and crochet are common methods of twisting and shaping the yarn into garments or fabric. from Fiber art

    • Acrylic is the "workhorse" hand-crafting fiber for crafters who knit or crochet; acrylic yarn may be perceived as "cheap" because it is typically priced lower than its natural-fiber counterparts, and because it lacks some of their properties, including softness and the ability to felt or take acid dyes. from Acrylic fiber

    • An increasing percentage of yarn is sold in hank form, especially hand dyed or hand spun yarns, which necessitates balling for knitters and crocheters. from Swift (textiles)

    • Swifts are not used very much in the textile industry, but are used more by knitters and crocheters who buy their yarn in hank form. from Swift (textiles)

    • Yarn bombing, yarnbombing, yarn storming, guerrilla knitting, kniffiti, urban knitting or graffiti knitting is a type of graffiti or street art that employs colourful displays of knitted or crocheted yarn or fibre rather than paint or chalk. from Yarn bombing

    • Nålebinding (Danish: literally "binding with a needle" or "needle-binding", also naalbinding, nålbinding or naalebinding) is a fabric creation technique predating both knitting and crochet. from Nålebinding

    • is the Japanese art of knitting or crocheting small stuffed animals and anthropomorphic creatures. from Amigurumi

    SHOW LESS
    1. 2
      Yarn Yarn is a long continuous length of interlocked fibres, suitable for use in the production of textiles, sewing…
    1. 2

      Yarn is a long continuous length of interlocked fibres, suitable for use in the production of textiles, sewing, crocheting, knitting, weaving, embroidery, and ropemaking. Thread is a type of yarn intended for sewing by hand or machine. Modern manufactured sewing threads may be finished with wax or other lubricants to withstand the stresses involved in sewing. Embroidery threads are yarns specifically designed for hand or machine embroidery.

      SHOW LESS

    How Knitting
    Connects To Yarn

    • new bights of yarn must be passed through the fabric, usually through active stitches, thus securing them. from Knitting

    • Like weaving, knitting is a technique for producing a two-dimensional fabric made from a one-dimensional yarn or thread. from Knitting

    • Yarn is a long continuous length of interlocked fibres, suitable for use in the production of textiles, sewing, crocheting, knitting, weaving, embroidery, and ropemaking. from Yarn

    SHOW MORE
    • In the textile arts, a stitch is a single turn or loop of thread or yarn. Stitches are the fundamental elements of sewing, knitting, embroidery, crochet, and needle lace-making, whether by hand or machine. from Stitch (textile arts)

    • Yarn weight refers to the thickness of yarn used by knitters, weavers, crocheters and other fiber artists. from Yarn weight

    • In textile manufacturing, finishing refers to the processes that convert the woven or knitted cloth into a usable material and more specifically to any process performed after dyeing the yarn or fabric to improve the look, performance, or "hand" (feel) of the finished textile or clothing. from Finishing (textiles)

    • After the knitting is done, short U-shaped loops of extra yarn are introduced through the fabric from the outside so that their ends point inwards (e.g., towards the hand inside the mitten). from Tufting

    • In knitting, a yarn over is technique in which the yarn is passed over the right-hand knitting needle. from Yarn over

    • Warp knitting is a family of knitting methods in which the yarn zigzags along the length of the fabric, i.e., following adjacent columns ("wales") of knitting, rather than a single row ("course"). from Warp knitting

    • Spinning turns the carded wool fibres into yarn which can then be directly woven, knitted (flat or circular), crocheted, or by other means turned into fabric or a garment. from Textile manufacturing by pre-industrial methods

    • Fibres are then washed to remove any dirt or debris and then spun into yarn suitable for weaving or knitting. from Camel hair

    • The jeep cap originally the US Army issued M1941 wool knit cap (Cap, Wool, Knit, M1941) is generally like a toboggan cap (or some sources also describe it as a beanie) with a short, baseball cap-like brim attached to it, made mostly from knitted yarn, originally wool but now more often acrylic. Also sometimes referred to as a "skull cap" due to its popularity with skateboarders (although the term "skull cap" is also used for a variety of completely different caps), or a "Radar cap" due to the cap being made famous by the character Radar O'Reilly from the hit US TV sitcom M*A*S*H. from Jeep cap

    • A bobble hat or bobble cap is a knit cap that has a yarn "bobble" or pom-pon upon its top. from Knit cap

    • Textiles, defined as felt or spun fibers made into yarn and subsequently netted, looped, knit or woven to make fabrics, appeared in the Middle East during the late stone age. from History of clothing and textiles

    • These are often made out of wool or yarn, knitted or crocheted. from Poncho

    SHOW LESS
    1. 3
      Spinning (textiles) Spinning is a major part of the textile industry. It is part of the textile manufacturing process where three types…
    1. 3

      Spinning is a major part of the textile industry. It is part of the textile manufacturing process where three types of fibre are converted into yarn, then fabrics, which undergo finishing processes such as bleaching to become textiles. The textiles are then fabricated into clothes or other products. There are three industrial processes available to…

      SHOW MORE

      Spinning is a major part of the textile industry. It is part of the textile manufacturing process where three types of fibre are converted into yarn, then fabrics, which undergo finishing processes such as bleaching to become textiles. The textiles are then fabricated into clothes or other products. There are three industrial processes available to spin yarn, and a handicraft community who use hand spinning techniques. Spinning is the twisting together of drawn out strands of fibres to form yarn, though it is colloquially used to describe the process of drawing out, inserting the twist, and winding onto bobbins.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To Spinning (textiles)

    • Although knitting may be done with ribbons, metal wire or more exotic filaments, most yarns are made by spinning fibers. from Knitting

    • Similar to quilting, spinning, and needlepoint, knitting became a leisure activity for the wealthy. from Knitting

    • As used in spinning, weaving, knitting, sewing, or lacemaking, the bobbin provides temporary or permanent storage for yarn and may be made of plastic, metal, bone or wood. from Bobbin

    SHOW MORE
    • It functions as an organizational tool for a variety of fiber arts including knitting, crocheting, spinning, and weaving. from Ravelry

    • Today, dyeing with natural materials is often practiced as an adjunct to handspinning, knitting and weaving. from Natural dye

    • Textiles, defined as felt or spun fibers made into yarn and subsequently netted, looped, knit or woven to make fabrics, appeared in the Middle East during the late stone age. from History of clothing and textiles

    • Ball winders are commonly used by knitters and occasionally spinners. from Winding machine

    • Pygora fiber is frequently used by artists for spinning, spindling, knitting, crocheting, weaving, tapestries, and other fiber arts. from Pygora goat

    • The department houses laboratories such as Spinning Lab, Weaving Lab, Chemical processing Lab, Quality Assurance and Testing Lab, Knitting Lab, Garment Lab and CAD Lab. from Alagappa College of Technology

    • Other traditional activities of the area included embroidery, making beaded jewelry, weaving (including traditional birch bark weaving), knitting, spinning, woodcarving (which included making traditional Russian wooden toys) and pottery. from Kizhi

    • Subsequent technical developments include innovations in spinning and knitting of cotton and wool. from Ancient Peru

    • Inhabitants practiced spinning and knitting of cotton and wool, basketry and pottery. from History of Peru

    SHOW LESS
    1. 4
      Knitting needle A knitting needle or knitting pin is a tool in hand-knitting to produce knitted fabrics. They generally have a long…
    1. 4

      A knitting needle or knitting pin is a tool in hand-knitting to produce knitted fabrics. They generally have a long shaft and taper at their end, but they are not nearly as sharp as sewing needles. Their purpose is two-fold. The long shaft holds the active (unsecured) stitches of the fabric, to prevent them from…

      SHOW MORE

      A knitting needle or knitting pin is a tool in hand-knitting to produce knitted fabrics. They generally have a long shaft and taper at their end, but they are not nearly as sharp as sewing needles. Their purpose is two-fold. The long shaft holds the active (unsecured) stitches of the fabric, to prevent them from unravelling, whereas the tapered ends are used to form new stitches. Most commonly, a new stitch is formed by inserting the tapered end through an active stitch, catching a loop (also called a bight) of fresh yarn and drawing it through the stitch; this secures the initial stitch and forms a new active stitch in its place. In specialized forms of knitting the needle may be passed between active stitches being held on another needle, or indeed between/through inactive stitches that have been knit previously.
      The size of a needle is described first by its diameter and secondly by its length. The size of the new stitch is determined in large part by the diameter of the knitting needle used to form it, because that affects the length of the yarn-loop drawn through the previous stitch. Thus, large stitches can be made with large needles, whereas fine knitting requires fine needles. In most cases, the knitting needles being used in hand-knitting are of the same diameter; however, in uneven knitting, needles of different sizes may be used. Larger stitches may also be made by wrapping the yarn more than once around the needles with every stitch. The length of a needle determines how many stitches it can hold at once; for example, very large projects such as a shawl with hundreds of stitches might require a longer needle than a small project such as a scarf or bootie. Various sizing systems for needles are in common use.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To Knitting needle

    • Although the diameter of the knitting needle is often measured in millimeters, there are several different measurement systems, particularly those specific to the United States, the United Kingdom and Japan; a conversion table is given at knitting needle. from Knitting

    • In very simple cases, knitting can be done without tools, using only the fingers to do these tasks; however, knitting is usually carried out using tools such as knitting needles, knitting machines or rigid frames. from Knitting

    • Originally, circular knitting was done using a set of four or five double-pointed knitting needles. Later, circular needles were invented. from Knitting

    SHOW MORE
    • The active stitches are held on a needle until another loop can be passed through them. from Knitting

    • In knitting, a yarn over is technique in which the yarn is passed over the right-hand knitting needle. from Yarn over

    • Finger knitting is a form of knitting where a knitted cord is created using only hands and fingers during the entire process, instead of knitting needles or other traditional tools. from Finger knitting

    • The Sheep is somewhat different from the Queen in terms of personality and gets "more like a porcupine every time [Alice] looks at her" because she knits with several knitting needles all at once. from White Queen (Through the Looking-Glass)

    • Knitting and crocheting involve interlacing loops of yarn, which are formed either on a knitting needle or on a crochet hook, together in a line. from Textile

    SHOW LESS
    1. 5
      Basic knitted fabrics Basic knitted fabrics are so fundamental that some types have been adopted as part of the language of knitting…
    1. 5

      Basic knitted fabrics are so fundamental that some types have been adopted as part of the language of knitting, similar to techniques such as yarn over or decrease. Examples include stockinette stitch, reverse stockinette stitch, garter stitch, seed stitch, faggoting, and tricot. In some cases, these fabrics appear differently on the right side (as seen when making the stitch) than on the wrong side (as seen from the other side, when the work is turned).

      SHOW LESS

    How Knitting
    Connects To Basic knitted fabrics

    • Other simple textures can be made with nothing but knit and purl stitches, including garter stitch, ribbing, and moss and seed stitches. from Knitting

    • The most common texture for a knitted garment is that generated by the flat stockinette stitch—as seen, though very small, in machine-made stockings and T-shirts—which is worked in the round as nothing but knit stitches, and worked flat as alternating rows of knit and purl. from Knitting

    • Each fabric has different properties: a garter stitch has much more vertical stretch, while ribbing stretches much more horizontally. from Knitting

    SHOW MORE
    • Stitches can be worked from either side, and various patterns are created by mixing regular knit stitches with the "wrong side" stitches, known as purl stitches, either in columns (ribbing), rows (garter, welting), or more complex patterns. from Knitting

    • (Despite being the "wrong side," reverse stockinette is frequently used as a pattern in its own right.) Because the yarn holding rows together is all on the front, and the yarn holding side-by-side stitches together is all on the back, stockinette fabric has a strong tendency to curl toward the front on the top and bottom, and toward the back on the left and right side. from Knitting

    • The basic knitted fabric (as in the diagram, and usually called a stocking or stockinette pattern) has a definite "right side" and "wrong side". from Knitting

    • In the round, reverse stockinette stitch is produced by purling every stitch. from Basic knitted fabrics

    • In knitting, ribbing is a pattern in which vertical stripes of stockinette stitch alternate with vertical s of reverse stockinette stitch. from Ribbing (knitting)

    SHOW LESS
    1. 6
      Felt Felt is a textile that is produced by matting, condensing and pressing fibres together. Felt can be made of natural…
    1. 6

      Felt is a textile that is produced by matting, condensing and pressing fibres together. Felt can be made of natural fibres such as wool or synthetic fibres such as acrylic. There are many different types of felts for industrial, technical, designer and craft applications. While some types of felt are very soft, some are tough…

      SHOW MORE

      Felt is a textile that is produced by matting, condensing and pressing fibres together. Felt can be made of natural fibres such as wool or synthetic fibres such as acrylic. There are many different types of felts for industrial, technical, designer and craft applications. While some types of felt are very soft, some are tough enough to form construction materials. Felt can vary in terms of fibre content, colour, size, thickness, density and more factors depending on the use of the felt.
      Many cultures have legends as to the origins of feltmaking. Sumerian legend claims that the secret of feltmaking was discovered by Urnamman of Lagash. The story of Saint Clement and Saint Christopher relates that while fleeing from persecution, the men packed their sandals with wool to prevent blisters. At the end of their journey, the movement and sweat had turned the wool into felt socks.
      Feltmaking is still practised by nomadic peoples (Altaic people:Mongols;Turkic people) in Central Asia, where rugs, tents and clothing are regularly made. Some of these are traditional items, such as the classic yurt (Gers), while others are designed for the tourist market, such as decorated slippers. In the Western world, felt is widely used as a medium for expression in textile art as well as design, where it has significance as an ecological textile.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To Felt

    • Of these types, wool is generally favored for knitting, chiefly owing to its superior elasticity, warmth and (sometimes) felting; however, wool is generally less convenient to clean and some people are allergic to it. from Knitting

    • The other methods are knitting, lace making, felting, and braiding or plaiting. from Weaving

    • The term is used in the textile manufacturing industry to denote fabrics, such as felt, which are neither woven nor knitted. Nonwoven materials typically lack strength unless densified or reinforced by a backing. from Nonwoven fabric

    SHOW MORE
    • Textiles, defined as felt or spun fibers made into yarn and subsequently netted, looped, knit or woven to make fabrics, appeared in the Middle East during the late stone age. from History of clothing and textiles

    • Textiles are formed by weaving, knitting, crocheting, knotting, or pressing fibres together (felt). from Textile

    • In the art of textiles a soft and flexible material of fibers or yarn is formed by spinning wool, flax, cotton, or other material on a spinning wheel and crocheting, knitting, knotting, weaving, or pressing fibres together (felt) to create a work. from List of artistic media

    • It comprises costume and costume accessories; loom-woven textiles; non-woven fabrics such as bark cloth, felt, and knitting; and objects whose primary decoration is produced through techniques such as beading and embroidery. from De Young (museum)

    • The wool industry was important in its early growth, and the town was a centre for the production of the very popular knitted and felted Monmouth caps, from the 15th century onwards. from Monmouth

    SHOW LESS
    1. 7
      Lace knitting Lace knitting is a style of knitting characterized by stable "holes" in the fabric arranged with consideration of…
    1. 7

      Lace knitting is a style of knitting characterized by stable "holes" in the fabric arranged with consideration of aesthetic value. Lace is sometimes considered the pinnacle of knitting, because of its complexity and because woven fabrics cannot easily be made to have holes. Famous examples include the wedding ring shawl of Shetland knitting, a shawl…

      SHOW MORE

      Lace knitting is a style of knitting characterized by stable "holes" in the fabric arranged with consideration of aesthetic value. Lace is sometimes considered the pinnacle of knitting, because of its complexity and because woven fabrics cannot easily be made to have holes. Famous examples include the wedding ring shawl of Shetland knitting, a shawl so fine that it could be drawn through a wedding ring. Shetland knitted lace became extremely popular in Victorian England when Queen Victoria became a Shetland lace enthusiast. From there, knitting patterns for the shawls were printed in English women's magazines where they were copied in Iceland with single ply wool.
      Some consider that "true" knitted lace has pattern stitches on both the right and wrong sides, and that knitting with pattern stitches on only one side of the fabric, so that holes are separated by at least two threads, is technically not lace, but "lacy knitting", although this has no historical basis.
      Eyelet patterns are those in which the holes make up only a small fraction of the fabric and are isolated into clusters (e.g., little rosettes of one hole surrounded by others in a hexagon). At the other extreme, some knitted lace is almost all holes, e.g., faggoting.
      Knitted lace with no bound-off edges is extremely elastic, deforming easily to fit whatever it is draped on. As a consequence, knitted lace garments must be blocked or "dressed" before use, and tend to stretch over time.
      Lace can be used for any kind of garment, but is commonly associated with scarves and shawls, or with household items such as curtains, table runners or trim for curtains and towels. Lace items from different regional knitting traditions are often distinguished by their patterns, shape and method, such as Faroese lace shawls which are knit bottom up with center back gusset shaping unlike a more common neck down, triangular shawl.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To Lace knitting

    • Combining certain increases, which can create small eyelet holes in the resulting fabric, with assorted decreases is key to creating knitted lace, a very open fabric resembling lace. from Knitting

    • This is used to great effect in lace knitting, which consists of making patterns and pictures using such holes, rather than with the stitches themselves. from Knitting

    • To design a simple lace motif, a knitter can draw its lines on a piece of knitting graph paper; right-slanting lines should be produced with "k2tog, yo" stitch-pairs (as seen on the right side) whereas left-slanting lines should be produced with "yo, k2tog tbl" (or, equivalently, "yo, ssk" or "yo, skp") stitch pairs (again, as seen on the right side). from Lace knitting

    SHOW MORE
    • Lace is sometimes considered the pinnacle of knitting, because of its complexity and because woven fabrics cannot easily be made to have holes. from Lace knitting

    • Lace knitting is a style of knitting characterized by stable "holes" in the fabric arranged with consideration of aesthetic value. from Lace knitting

    SHOW LESS
    1. 8
      Lace Lace is an openwork fabric, patterned with open holes in the work, made by machine or by hand. The holes can be…
    1. 8

      Lace is an openwork fabric, patterned with open holes in the work, made by machine or by hand. The holes can be formed via removal of threads or cloth from a previously woven fabric, but more often open spaces are created as part of the lace fabric. Lace-making is an ancient craft. True lace was…

      SHOW MORE

      Lace is an openwork fabric, patterned with open holes in the work, made by machine or by hand. The holes can be formed via removal of threads or cloth from a previously woven fabric, but more often open spaces are created as part of the lace fabric. Lace-making is an ancient craft. True lace was not made until the late 15th and early 16th centuries. A true lace is created when a thread is looped, twisted or braided to other threads independently from a backing fabric.
      Originally linen, silk, gold, or silver threads were used. Now lace is often made with cotton thread, although linen and silk threads are still available. Manufactured lace may be made of synthetic fiber. A few modern artists make lace with a fine copper or silver wire instead of thread.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To Lace

    • Combining certain increases, which can create small eyelet holes in the resulting fabric, with assorted decreases is key to creating knitted lace, a very open fabric resembling lace. from Knitting

    • Lace is sometimes considered the pinnacle of knitting, because of its complexity and because woven fabrics cannot easily be made to have holes. from Lace knitting

    • As used in spinning, weaving, knitting, sewing, or lacemaking, the bobbin provides temporary or permanent storage for yarn and may be made of plastic, metal, bone or wood. from Bobbin

    SHOW MORE
    • This type of finely knit, down-hair lace shawl originated in the Orenburg area about 250 years ago, in the 18th century. from Orenburg shawl

    • For the Museum of Arts and Design, McFadden has organized exhibitions that include Defining Craft (2000), Changing Hands: Art Without Reservation—Contemporary Native American Art (with co-curator Ellen Taubman), Radical Lace and Subversive Knitting (2007), Pricked: Extreme Embroidery (2008),Second Lives: Remixing the Ordinary (2008),Read My Pins: The Madeleine Albright Collection, Slash:Paper Under the Knife (2009). from David Revere McFadden

    SHOW LESS
    1. 9
      Quilting Quilting can refer either to the process of creating a quilt or to the sewing of two or more layers of material…
    1. 9

      Quilting can refer either to the process of creating a quilt or to the sewing of two or more layers of material together to make a thicker padded material. "Quilting" as the process of creating a quilt uses "quilting" as the joining of layers as one of its steps, often along with designing, piecing, appliqué,…

      SHOW MORE

      Quilting can refer either to the process of creating a quilt or to the sewing of two or more layers of material together to make a thicker padded material. "Quilting" as the process of creating a quilt uses "quilting" as the joining of layers as one of its steps, often along with designing, piecing, appliqué, binding and other steps. A quilter is the name given to someone who works at quilting. Quilting can be done by hand, by sewing machine, or by a specialist longarm quilting system.
      The process of quilting uses a needle and thread to join two or more layers of material to make a quilt. Typical quilting is done with 3 layers: the top fabric or quilt top, batting or insulating material and backing material. The quilter's hand or sewing machine passes the needle and thread through all layers and then brings the needle back up. The process is repeated across the entire area where quilting is wanted. A rocking, straight or running stitch is commonly used and these stitches can be purely functional or decorative and elaborate. Quilting is done to create bed spreads, art quilt wall hangings, clothing, and a variety of textile products. Quilting can make a project thick, or with dense quilting, can raise one area so that another stands out.
      Quilt stores often sell fabric, thread, patterns and other goods that are used for quilting. They often have group sewing and quilting classes, where one can learn how to sew or quilt and work with others to exchange skills. Quilt stores often have quilting machines that can be rented out for use, or customers can drop off their quilts and have them professionally quilted.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To Quilting

    • Similar to quilting, spinning, and needlepoint, knitting became a leisure activity for the wealthy. from Knitting

    • Construction methods such as sewing, knitting, crochet, and tailoring, as well as the tools employed (looms and sewing needles), techniques employed (quilting and pleating) and the objects made (carpets, hooked rugs, and coverlets) all fall under the category of textile arts. from Textile arts

    • Mathematical ideas have been used as inspiration for a number of fiber arts including quilt making, knitting, cross-stitch, crochet, embroidery and weaving. from Mathematics and fiber arts

    SHOW MORE
    • Her hobbies include quilting and knitting, with an emerging interest in Association football. from Laura Janner-Klausner

    • Traditional knitting, quilting and rug hooking circles in rural New England have become less common; church, sports, and town government are more typical social activities. from New England

    SHOW LESS
    1. 10
      Fair Isle (technique) Fair Isle is a traditional knitting technique used to create patterns with multiple colours. It is named after Fair…
    1. 10

      Fair Isle is a traditional knitting technique used to create patterns with multiple colours. It is named after Fair Isle, a tiny island in the north of Scotland, that forms part of the Shetland islands. Fair Isle knitting gained a considerable popularity when the Prince of Wales (later to become Edward VIII) wore Fair Isle…

      SHOW MORE

      Fair Isle is a traditional knitting technique used to create patterns with multiple colours. It is named after Fair Isle, a tiny island in the north of Scotland, that forms part of the Shetland islands. Fair Isle knitting gained a considerable popularity when the Prince of Wales (later to become Edward VIII) wore Fair Isle tank tops in public in 1921. Traditional Fair Isle patterns have a limited palette of five or so colours, use only two colours per row, are worked in the round, and limit the length of a run of any particular colour.
      Some people use the term "Fair Isle" to refer to any colourwork knitting where stitches are knit alternately in various colours, with the unused colours stranded across the back of the work. Others use the term "stranded colourwork" for the generic technique, and reserve the term "Fair Isle" for the characteristic patterns of the Shetland Islands.
      Other techniques for knitting in colour include intarsia, slip-stitch colour (also known as mosaic knitting).

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To Fair Isle (technique)

    • More complicated techniques permit large fields of color (intarsia, for example), busy small-scale patterns of color (such as Fair Isle), or both (double knitting and slip-stitch color, for example). from Knitting

    • Slip-stitch knitting plays an important role in mosaic knitting, an important technique in hand-knitting patterned fabrics; mosaic-knit fabrics tend to be stiffer than patterned fabrics produced by other methods such as Fair-Isle knitting. from Knitting

    • In the more complex stranded approach, two or more yarns alternate repeatedly within one row and all the yarns must be carried along the row, as seen in Fair Isle sweaters. from Knitting

    SHOW MORE
    • The two most common approaches are intarsia and stranded colorwork. from Knitting

    • Fair Isle is a traditional knitting technique used to create patterns with multiple colours. from Fair Isle (technique)

    SHOW LESS
    1. 11
      Cable knitting Cable knitting is a style of knitting in which textures of crossing layers are achieved by permuting stitches. For…
    1. 11

      Cable knitting is a style of knitting in which textures of crossing layers are achieved by permuting stitches. For example, given four stitches appearing on the needle in the order ABCD, one might cross the first two (in front of or behind) the next two, so that in subsequent rows those stitches appear in the new order CDAB.

      SHOW LESS

    How Knitting
    Connects To Cable knitting

    • Changing the order of stitches from one row to the next, usually with the help of a cable needle or stitch holder, is key to cable knitting, producing an endless variety of cables, honeycombs, ropes, and Aran sweater patterning. from Knitting

    • Arbitrarily complex braid patterns can be done in cable knitting, with the proviso that the wales must move ever upwards; it is generally impossible for a wale to move up and then down the fabric. from Knitting

    • Cable knitting is a style of knitting in which textures of crossing layers are achieved by permuting stitches. from Cable knitting

    1. 12
      Ribbing (knitting) In knitting, ribbing is a pattern in which vertical stripes of stockinette stitch alternate with vertical stripes…
    1. 12

      In knitting, ribbing is a pattern in which vertical stripes of stockinette stitch alternate with vertical stripes of reverse stockinette stitch. These two types of stripes may be separated by other stripes in which knit and purl stitches alternate vertically; such plissé stripes add width and depth to ribbing but not more elasticity.…

      SHOW MORE

      In knitting, ribbing is a pattern in which vertical stripes of stockinette stitch alternate with vertical stripes of reverse stockinette stitch. These two types of stripes may be separated by other stripes in which knit and purl stitches alternate vertically; such plissé stripes add width and depth to ribbing but not more elasticity.
      The number of knit and purl stripes (wales) are generally equal, although they need not be. When they are equal, the fabric has no tendency to curl, unlike stockinette stitch. Such ribbing looks the same on both sides and is useful for garments such as scarves.
      Ribbing is notated by (number of knit stitches) x (number of purl stitches). Thus, 1x1 ribbing has one knit stitch, followed by one purl stitch, followed by one knit stitch, and so on.
      Ribbing has a strong tendency to contract laterally, forming small pleats in which the purl stitches recede and the knit stitches come forward. Thus, ribbing is often used for cuffs, sweater hems and, more generally, any edge that should be form-fitting. The elasticity depends on the number of knit/purl transitions; 1x1 ribbing is more elastic than 2x2 ribbing, etc. However, some cable patterns may "pull in" more than ribbing (i.e., have a smaller gauge); in such cases, a ribbed border may flare out instead of contracting.
      Slip stitches may be added to increase the depth of the ribbing, and to accentuate the stitches of certain wales. For example, the knit stitches can be slipped every other row to double their height and make them come forward.
      Ribs can be decorated with nearly any motif used for a plain knitted fabric, e.g., bobbles, cables, lace, various colors, and so on.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To Ribbing (knitting)

    • Other simple textures can be made with nothing but knit and purl stitches, including garter stitch, ribbing, and moss and seed stitches. from Knitting

    • Each fabric has different properties: a garter stitch has much more vertical stretch, while ribbing stretches much more horizontally. from Knitting

    • Stitches can be worked from either side, and various patterns are created by mixing regular knit stitches with the "wrong side" stitches, known as purl stitches, either in columns (ribbing), rows (garter, welting), or more complex patterns. from Knitting

    SHOW MORE
    • Vertical stripes (ribbing) are possible by having alternating wales of knit and purl stitches. from Knitting

    • In knitting, ribbing is a pattern in which vertical stripes of stockinette stitch alternate with vertical s of reverse stockinette stitch. from Ribbing (knitting)

    • In knitting, welting is the horizontal analog of ribbing; that is, one or more horizontal rows of knit stitches alternating with one or more rows of purl stitches. from Welting (knitting)

    SHOW LESS
    1. 13
      Casting on (knitting) In knitting, casting on is a family of techniques for adding new stitches that do not depend on earlier stitches…
    1. 13

      In knitting, casting on is a family of techniques for adding new stitches that do not depend on earlier stitches, i.e., stitches having an independent lower edge. In principle, casting on is the opposite of binding off, but the techniques involved are generally unrelated.…

      SHOW MORE

      In knitting, casting on is a family of techniques for adding new stitches that do not depend on earlier stitches, i.e., stitches having an independent lower edge. In principle, casting on is the opposite of binding off, but the techniques involved are generally unrelated.
      Casting on can also be decorated with various stitch patterns, especially picots. The cast-on stitches can also be twisted clockwise or counterclockwise as they are added to the needle; this is commonly done for the single cast-on described above to give it a neater, more uniform look.
      Casting on is sometimes done with two needles, or a needle of larger size; the extra length of yarn in each stitch gives the edge more flexibility.
      When casting on at the beginning, one end of the yarn must be secured to the knitting needle by knotting it, usually with a slip knot. This knot is unnecessary when casting on in the middle of the fabric (e.g., when making the upper edge of a buttonhole) since the yarn is already secured to the fabric. The original slip knot can also be pulled out (after a few rows have been knitted) without damaging the knitted fabric.
      Once one loop has been secured around the needle, others can be added by several methods.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To Casting on (knitting)

    • A piece of knitting begins with the process of casting on (also known as "binding on"), which involves the initial creation of the stitches on the needle. from Knitting

    • The initial and final edges of a knitted fabric are known as the cast-on and bound/cast-off edges. from Knitting

    • To secure the initial stitches of a knitted fabric, a method for casting on is used; to secure the final stitches in a wale, one uses a method of binding/casting off. from Knitting

    SHOW MORE
    • In knitting, casting on is a family of techniques for adding new stitches that do not depend on earlier stitches, i.e., stitches having an independent lower edge. from Casting on (knitting)

    • In knitted fabrics, selvages are the unfinished yet structurally sound edges that were neither cast on nor bound off. Historically, the term selvage applied only to loom woven fabric, though now can be applied to flat-knitted fabric. from Selvage

    SHOW LESS
    1. 14
      Embroidery Embroidery is the handicraft of decorating fabric or other materials with needle and thread or yarn. Embroidery may…
    1. 14

      Embroidery is the handicraft of decorating fabric or other materials with needle and thread or yarn. Embroidery may also incorporate other materials such as metal strips, pearls, beads, quills, and sequins. Embroidery is most often used on caps, hats, coats, blankets, dress shirts, denim, stockings, and golf shirts. Embroidery is available with a wide variety of thread or yarn color.…

      SHOW MORE

      Embroidery is the handicraft of decorating fabric or other materials with needle and thread or yarn. Embroidery may also incorporate other materials such as metal strips, pearls, beads, quills, and sequins. Embroidery is most often used on caps, hats, coats, blankets, dress shirts, denim, stockings, and golf shirts. Embroidery is available with a wide variety of thread or yarn color.
      An interesting characteristic of embroidery is that the basic techniques or stitches on surviving examples of the earliest embroidery—chain stitch, buttonhole or blanket stitch, running stitch, satin stitch, cross stitch—remain the fundamental techniques of hand embroidery today.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To Embroidery

    • Additional patterns can be made on the surface of the knitted fabric using embroidery; if the embroidery resembles knitting, it is often called Swiss darning. from Knitting

    • Yarn is a long continuous length of interlocked fibres, suitable for use in the production of textiles, sewing, crocheting, knitting, weaving, embroidery, and ropemaking. from Yarn

    • In the textile arts, a stitch is a single turn or loop of thread or yarn. Stitches are the fundamental elements of sewing, knitting, embroidery, crochet, and needle lace-making, whether by hand or machine. from Stitch (textile arts)

    SHOW MORE
    • For the Museum of Arts and Design, McFadden has organized exhibitions that include Defining Craft (2000), Changing Hands: Art Without Reservation—Contemporary Native American Art (with co-curator Ellen Taubman), Radical Lace and Subversive Knitting (2007), Pricked: Extreme Embroidery (2008),Second Lives: Remixing the Ordinary (2008),Read My Pins: The Madeleine Albright Collection, Slash:Paper Under the Knife (2009). from David Revere McFadden

    • Mathematical ideas have been used as inspiration for a number of fiber arts including quilt making, knitting, cross-stitch, crochet, embroidery and weaving. from Mathematics and fiber arts

    • Past workshops have included herbalism, improvisation, embroidery, and knitting. from New Vista High School

    • Elements of Dress Designing : Tailoring, Stitching, Embroidery, Knitting. from Bhavan's Vidya Mandir, Girinagar

    • Handwork (including knitting, crochet, sewing and embroidery) is taught from age 6 on, with projects which may include cushions, socks, gloves and dolls. from Curriculum of the Waldorf schools

    • Tamacine also has various traditional industries, such as pottery, jewellery, textile industries including embroidery and knitting, and blacksmithing. from Tamacine

    • While she was academically unimpressive, she showed a precocious talent for needlework, claiming to have been able to knit, embroider, and sew by the age of six. from Jean Muir

    • Other traditional activities of the area included embroidery, making beaded jewelry, weaving (including traditional birch bark weaving), knitting, spinning, woodcarving (which included making traditional Russian wooden toys) and pottery. from Kizhi

    • European colonists and American pioneers used this dye to color yarn for use in the production of textiles, sewing, crocheting, knitting, weaving, and embroidery. from Fraxinus quadrangulata

    • Socially Useful Productive Work (SUPW) is a subject in Indian schools where students can choose from a number of vocational education activities - embroidery and knitting, gardening, cooking, painting, carpentry and other crafts and hobbies, and clubbed community service for senior students (class IX onwards). from Socially Useful Productive Work

    • She also taught her granddaughter to read, write, speak a hybrid language of French and English, make dresses, crochet, knit, and embroider; Furthermore she encouraged an appreciation for poetry and music in the young girl and instilled in her a tendency to make quick judgments and hold strong opinions, personality traits Edith would exhibit her entire life. from Edith Wilson

    • In the 1980s, she also wrote two books on knitting and one on embroidery. from Lalla Ward

    SHOW LESS
    1. 15
      Circular knitting Circular knitting or knitting in the round is a form of knitting that creates a seamless tube. When knitting…
    1. 15

      Circular knitting or knitting in the round is a form of knitting that creates a seamless tube. When knitting circularly, the knitting is cast on and the circle of stitches is joined. Knitting is worked in rounds (the equivalent of rows in flat knitting) in a spiral. Originally, circular knitting was done using a set…

      SHOW MORE

      Circular knitting or knitting in the round is a form of knitting that creates a seamless tube. When knitting circularly, the knitting is cast on and the circle of stitches is joined. Knitting is worked in rounds (the equivalent of rows in flat knitting) in a spiral. Originally, circular knitting was done using a set of four or five double-pointed needles. Later, circular needles were invented, which can also be used to knit in the round: the circular needle looks like two short knitting needles connected by a cable between them.
      Longer circular needles can be used to produce narrow tubes of knitting for socks, mittens, and other items using the Magic Loop technique. Machines also produce circular knitting; double bed machines can be set up to knit on the front bed in one direction then the back bed on the return, creating a knitted tube. Specialized knitting machines for sock-knitting use individual latch-hook needles to make each stitch in a round frame.
      Many types of sweaters are traditionally knit in the round. Planned openings (arm holes, necks, cardigan fronts) are temporarily knitted with extra stitches, reinforced if necessary. Then the extra stitches are cut to create the opening, and are stitched with a sewing machine to prevent unraveling. This technique is called steeking.
      The Magic Loop technique Invented by Sarah Hauschka and written in Beverly Galeska's booklet "The Magic Loop," published by FiberTrends, the Magic Loop uses a 40-inch-long circular needle to knit projects of any circumference in the round. The key is pulling a loop of extra cable out between the stitches halfway through the round.
      Using a 47-inch-long circular needle lets the knitter knit two-at-a-time projects, like two socks at once, using the Magic Loop method.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To Circular knitting

    • Circular needles may be used for flat or circular knitting. from Knitting

    • DPNs are typically used for circular knitting, especially smaller tube-shaped pieces such as sleeves, collars, and socks; usually one needle is active while the others hold the remaining active stitches. from Knitting

    • (See Circular knitting.) (note) left-handed knitting slightly different process. from Knitting

    SHOW MORE
    • Circular knitting or knitting in the round is a form of knitting that creates a seamless tube. from Circular knitting

    • In the round, reverse stockinette stitch is produced by purling every stitch. from Basic knitted fabrics

    • In knitting, steeking is a shortcut used to knit garments such as sweaters in the round without interruption for openings or sleeves until the end. from Steek

    • Spinning turns the carded wool fibres into yarn which can then be directly woven, knitted (flat or circular), crocheted, or by other means turned into fabric or a garment. from Textile manufacturing by pre-industrial methods

    SHOW LESS
    1. 16
      Binding off In knitting, binding off, or casting off, is a family of techniques for ending a column (a wale) of stitches…
    1. 16

      In knitting, binding off, or casting off, is a family of techniques for ending a column (a wale) of stitches. Binding off is typically used to define the final (usually upper, taking the cast on edge as the lower) edge of a knitted fabric, although it may also be used in other contexts, e.g., in…

      SHOW MORE

      In knitting, binding off, or casting off, is a family of techniques for ending a column (a wale) of stitches. Binding off is typically used to define the final (usually upper, taking the cast on edge as the lower) edge of a knitted fabric, although it may also be used in other contexts, e.g., in making button holes. In principle, binding off is the opposite of casting on, but the techniques are generally not mirror images of one another. Sometimes, however, they can produce a mirror image appearance.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To Binding off

    • Crochet hooks and a darning needle are often useful in binding/casting off or in joining two knitted pieces edge-to-edge. from Knitting

    • Once the knitted piece is finished, the remaining live stitches are "cast off". from Knitting

    • The initial and final edges of a knitted fabric are known as the cast-on and bound/cast-off edges. from Knitting

    SHOW MORE
    • To secure the initial stitches of a knitted fabric, a method for casting on is used; to secure the final stitches in a wale, one uses a method of binding/casting off. from Knitting

    • In knitting, binding off, or casting off, is a family of techniques for ending a column (a wale) of stitches. from Binding off

    • In knitted fabrics, selvages are the unfinished yet structurally sound edges that were neither cast on nor bound off. Historically, the term selvage applied only to loom woven fabric, though now can be applied to flat-knitted fabric. from Selvage

    SHOW LESS
    1. 17
      Gauge (knitting) In knitting, the word gauge is used both in hand knitting and machine knitting; the latter, technical abbreviation…
    1. 17

      In knitting, the word gauge is used both in hand knitting and machine knitting; the latter, technical abbreviation GG, refers to "Knitting Machines" fineness size. In both cases, the term refers to the number of stitches per inch, not the size of the finished garment. In both cases, the gauge is measured by counting the…

      SHOW MORE

      In knitting, the word gauge is used both in hand knitting and machine knitting; the latter, technical abbreviation GG, refers to "Knitting Machines" fineness size. In both cases, the term refers to the number of stitches per inch, not the size of the finished garment. In both cases, the gauge is measured by counting the number of stitches (in hand knitting) or the number of needles (on a knitting machine bed) over several inches then dividing by the number of inches in the width of the sample.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To Gauge (knitting)

    • Thus, a simple way to change gauge/tension is to use different needles, which is the basis of uneven knitting. from Knitting

    • The diameter affects the size of stitches, which affects the gauge/tension of the knitting and the elasticity of the fabric. from Knitting

    • More resilient yarns are more forgiving of irregularities in tension; highly twisted yarns are sometimes difficult to knit, whereas untwisting yarns can lead to split stitches, in which not all of the yarn is knitted into a stitch. from Knitting

    SHOW MORE
    • The thickness or weight of the yarn is a significant factor in determining the gauge/tension, i.e., how many stitches and rows are required to cover a given area for a given stitch pattern. from Knitting

    • Skeins and balls are generally sold with a yarn-band, a label that describes the yarn's weight, length, dye lot, fiber content, washing instructions, suggested needle size, likely gauge/tension, etc. from Knitting

    • Individual stitches, or rows of stitches, may be made taller by drawing more yarn into the new loop (an elongated stitch), which is the basis for uneven knitting: a row of tall stitches may alternate with one or more rows of short stitches for an interesting visual effect. from Knitting

    • Patterns and pictures can be created in knitted fabrics by using knit and purl stitches as "pixels"; however, such pixels are usually rectangular, rather than square, depending on the gauge/tension of the knitting. from Knitting

    • Patterns for knitting projects almost always include a suggested gauge for the project. from Gauge (knitting)

    • In knitting, the word gauge is used both in hand knitting and machine knitting; the latter, technical abbreviation GG, refers to "Knitting Machines" fineness size. from Gauge (knitting)

    SHOW LESS
    1. 18
      Increase (knitting) In knitting, an increase is the creation of one or more new stitches, which may be done by various methods that…
    1. 18

      In knitting, an increase is the creation of one or more new stitches, which may be done by various methods that create distinctive effects in the fabric.

      SHOW LESS

    How Knitting
    Connects To Increase (knitting)

    • The number of active stitches remains the same as when cast on unless stitches are added (an increase) or removed (a decrease). from Knitting

    • Combining certain increases, which can create small eyelet holes in the resulting fabric, with assorted decreases is key to creating knitted lace, a very open fabric resembling lace. from Knitting

    • A wale can split into two or more wales using increases, most commonly involving a yarn over. from Knitting

    SHOW MORE
    • Extra curvature can be introduced into knitted garments without seams, as in the heel of a sock; the effect of darts, flares, etc. can be obtained with short rows or by increasing or decreasing the number of stitches. from Knitting

    • In knitting, an increase is the creation of one or more new stitches, which may be done by various methods that create distinctive effects in the fabric. from Increase (knitting)

    • A row counter for hand knitting is a tally counter for counting rows or courses worked, for counting stitch pattern repetitions, or for counting increases or decreases of the number of stitches in consecutive rows. from Row counter (hand knitting)

    SHOW LESS
    1. 19
      Weaving Weaving is a method of fabric production in which two distinct sets of yarns or threads are interlaced at right…
    1. 19

      Weaving is a method of fabric production in which two distinct sets of yarns or threads are interlaced at right angles to form a fabric or cloth. The other methods are knitting, lace making, felting, and braiding or plaiting. The longitudinal threads are called the warp and the lateral threads are the weft or filling.…

      SHOW MORE

      Weaving is a method of fabric production in which two distinct sets of yarns or threads are interlaced at right angles to form a fabric or cloth. The other methods are knitting, lace making, felting, and braiding or plaiting. The longitudinal threads are called the warp and the lateral threads are the weft or filling. (Weft or woof is an old English word meaning "that which is woven".) The method in which these threads are inter woven affects the characteristics of the cloth.
      Cloth is usually woven on a loom, a device that holds the warp threads in place while filling threads are woven through them. A fabric band which meets this definition of cloth (warp threads with a weft thread winding between) can also be made using other methods, including tablet weaving, back-strap, or other techniques without looms.
      The way the warp and filling threads interlace with each other is called the weave. The majority of woven products are created with one of three basic weaves: plain weave, satin weave, or twill. Woven cloth can be plain (in one colour or a simple pattern), or can be woven in decorative or artistic designs.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To Weaving

    • Unlike woven fabrics, where strands usually run straight horizontally and vertically, yarn that has been knitted follows a looped path along its row, as with the red strand in the diagram at left, in which the loops of one row have all been pulled through the loops of the row below it. from Knitting

    • Like weaving, knitting is a technique for producing a two-dimensional fabric made from a one-dimensional yarn or thread. from Knitting

    • The other methods are knitting, lace making, felting, and braiding or plaiting. from Weaving

    SHOW MORE
    • Yarn is a long continuous length of interlocked fibres, suitable for use in the production of textiles, sewing, crocheting, knitting, weaving, embroidery, and ropemaking. from Yarn

    • The collective term "linens" is still often used generically to describe a class of woven and even knitted bed, bath, table and kitchen textiles traditionally made of linen. from Linen

    • Textiles are formed by weaving, knitting, crocheting, knotting, or pressing fibres together (felt). from Textile

    • Today, dyeing with natural materials is often practiced as an adjunct to handspinning, knitting and weaving. from Natural dye

    • As used in spinning, weaving, knitting, sewing, or lacemaking, the bobbin provides temporary or permanent storage for yarn and may be made of plastic, metal, bone or wood. from Bobbin

    • In textile manufacturing, finishing refers to the processes that convert the woven or knitted cloth into a usable material and more specifically to any process performed after dyeing the yarn or fabric to improve the look, performance, or "hand" (feel) of the finished textile or clothing. from Finishing (textiles)

    • Macramé or macrame is a form of textile-making using knotting rather than weaving or knitting. from Macramé

    • Yarn weight refers to the thickness of yarn used by knitters, weavers, crocheters and other fiber artists. from Yarn weight

    • It functions as an organizational tool for a variety of fiber arts including knitting, crocheting, spinning, and weaving. from Ravelry

    • (Both fibre and fiber are used in this article.) The yarn is processed by knitting or weaving, which turns yarn into cloth. from Glossary of textile manufacturing

    • The term is used in the textile manufacturing industry to denote fabrics, such as felt, which are neither woven nor knitted. Nonwoven materials typically lack strength unless densified or reinforced by a backing. from Nonwoven fabric

    • Yarn was too precious, and had to be saved for knitting and weaving. from Rug hooking

    SHOW LESS
    1. 20
      Decrease (knitting) A decrease in knitting is a reduction in the number of stitches, usually accomplished by suspending the stitch to…
    1. 20

      A decrease in knitting is a reduction in the number of stitches, usually accomplished by suspending the stitch to be decreased from another existing stitch or by knitting it together with another stitch.

      SHOW LESS

    How Knitting
    Connects To Decrease (knitting)

    • The number of active stitches remains the same as when cast on unless stitches are added (an increase) or removed (a decrease). from Knitting

    • Combining certain increases, which can create small eyelet holes in the resulting fabric, with assorted decreases is key to creating knitted lace, a very open fabric resembling lace. from Knitting

    • The new loop may also be passed through two or more previous stitches, producing a decrease and merging wales together. from Knitting

    SHOW MORE
    • Extra curvature can be introduced into knitted garments without seams, as in the heel of a sock; the effect of darts, flares, etc. can be obtained with short rows or by increasing or decreasing the number of stitches. from Knitting

    • A row counter for hand knitting is a tally counter for counting rows or courses worked, for counting stitch pattern repetitions, or for counting increases or decreases of the number of stitches in consecutive rows. from Row counter (hand knitting)

    SHOW LESS
    1. 21
      Yarn over In knitting, a yarn over is technique in which the yarn is passed over the right-hand knitting needle. In general…
    1. 21

      In knitting, a yarn over is technique in which the yarn is passed over the right-hand knitting needle. In general, the new loop is knitted on the next row, either by itself (producing a hole) or together with an adjacent stitch (e.g., in "tucked" slip stitches). The yarn-over may also be dropped on the next…

      SHOW MORE

      In knitting, a yarn over is technique in which the yarn is passed over the right-hand knitting needle. In general, the new loop is knitted on the next row, either by itself (producing a hole) or together with an adjacent stitch (e.g., in "tucked" slip stitches). The yarn-over may also be dropped on the next row, producing a longer stretch of yarn between the stitches of the previous row. Conversely, the effect of a yarn-over can be obtained by picking up the yarn between stitches of the previous row; the difference is that the yarn then is shorter, and the flanking stitches of the previous row may be overly drawn together.
      The term "yarn-over" refers only to the act of wrapping the yarn around the needle, and not to the working of the next existing stitch. Yarn-overs are often used to increase the number of stitches, since knitting a yarn-over creates a new stitch where none existed previously, but does not use up a stitch on the needle. Yarn-overs are also common in eyelet and lace knitting, since they produce stable holes in the fabric.
      Yarn-overs are also used to slip stitches neatly without having to pass the yarn in front or back. Instead, a yarn-over is done adjacent to the slipped stitch, and the two are knit together on the following row. Thus, the yarn is "tucked away" by passing over the slipped stitch, rather than in front or back. This is the basis for brioche knitting.
      There are several types of yarn-over, depending on how many times the yarn is wrapped around the knitting needle and on the direction (chirality) with which the yarn is wrapped. Normally, the yarn is wrapped with a right-handed chirality, i.e., counterclockwise when looking at the right-hand needle point-on. Wrapping the yarn the other way (i.e., left-handedly) will result in a plaited stitch if the stitch is knit on the following row.
      Wrapping the yarn multiple times produces very long loop, which can yield interesting visual effects. For example, a row of such long stitches makes an interesting horizontal stripe. Alternatively, the knitting of the long loop can be deferred until a later row (e.g., 5 rows later); in this case, the loop need not be knit vertically, but can be knit diagonally, e.g., to form the lower leaves of a flower.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To Yarn over

    • A wale can split into two or more wales using increases, most commonly involving a yarn over. from Knitting

    • In knitting, a yarn over is technique in which the yarn is passed over the right-hand knitting needle. from Yarn over

    1. 22
      Intarsia (knitting) Intarsia is a knitting technique used to create patterns with multiple colours. As with the woodworking technique…
    1. 22

      Intarsia is a knitting technique used to create patterns with multiple colours. As with the woodworking technique of the same name, fields of different colours and materials appear to be inlaid in one another, but are in fact all separate pieces, fit together like a jigsaw puzzle.…

      SHOW MORE

      Intarsia is a knitting technique used to create patterns with multiple colours. As with the woodworking technique of the same name, fields of different colours and materials appear to be inlaid in one another, but are in fact all separate pieces, fit together like a jigsaw puzzle.
      Unlike other multicolour techniques (including Fair Isle, slip-stitch colour, and double knitting), there is only one "active" colour on any given stitch, and yarn is not carried across the back of the work; when a colour changes on a given row, the old yarn is left hanging. This means that any intarsia piece is topologically several disjoint columns of colour; a simple blue circle on a white background involves one column of blue and two of white—one for the left and one for the right. Intarsia is most often worked flat, rather than in the round. However, it is possible to knit intarsia in circular knitting using particular techniques.
      Common examples of intarsia include sweaters with large, solid-colour features like fruits, flowers, or geometric shapes. Argyle socks and sweaters are normally done in intarsia, although the thin diagonal lines are often overlaid in a later step, using Swiss darning or sometimes just a simple backstitch.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To Intarsia (knitting)

    • More complicated techniques permit large fields of color (intarsia, for example), busy small-scale patterns of color (such as Fair Isle), or both (double knitting and slip-stitch color, for example). from Knitting

    • The two most common approaches are intarsia and stranded colorwork. from Knitting

    • Intarsia is a knitting technique used to create patterns with multiple colours. from Intarsia (knitting)

    SHOW MORE
    • As a knitting pattern, argyle is generally accomplished using the intarsia technique. from Argyle (pattern)

    SHOW LESS
    1. 23
      Sweater A sweater (American English) is a knitted garment intended to cover the torso and arms; either a pullover or a…
    1. 23

      A sweater (American English) is a knitted garment intended to cover the torso and arms; either a pullover or a cardigan, distinguished in that cardigans open at the front while pullovers do not. In British English, a pullover may also be called a jumper or jersey, and there is no hypernym equivalent to sweater covering…

      SHOW MORE

      A sweater (American English) is a knitted garment intended to cover the torso and arms; either a pullover or a cardigan, distinguished in that cardigans open at the front while pullovers do not. In British English, a pullover may also be called a jumper or jersey, and there is no hypernym equivalent to sweater covering both pullovers and cardigans. Sweaters are worn by adults and children of both sexes; often over a shirt, blouse, T-shirt, or other top, but sometimes next to the skin. Sweaters were traditionally made from wool, but can now be made of cotton, synthetic fibers, or any combination thereof. Sweaters are maintained by washing or dry cleaning, and the use of a lint roller or pill razor.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To Sweater

    • In knitting certain articles of clothing, especially larger ones like sweaters, the final knitted garment will be made of several knitted pieces, with individual sections of the garment knit separately and then sewn together. from Knitting

    • Sweater design is a specialization of fashion design in which knitted sweaters are designed to fulfill certain aesthetic, functional and commercial criteria. from Sweater design

    • A jersey is an item of knitted clothing, traditionally in wool or cotton, with sleeves, worn as a pullover, as it does not open at the front, unlike a cardigan. from Jersey (clothing)

    SHOW MORE
    • Pure cashmere can be dyed and spun into yarns and knitted into jumpers (sweaters), hats, gloves, socks and other clothing, or woven into fabrics then cut and assembled into garments such as outer coats, jackets, trousers (pants), pajamas, scarves, blankets, and other items. from Cashmere wool

    • The cardigan is a knitted jacket or button-front sweater created to keep British soldiers warm in Russian winters. from Clothing terminology

    • For cold weather, a jumper was knitted from yarn or wool. from Military uniform

    • Crafts have traditionally included three crochetted doilies, a smocked baby's dress and a man's knitted sleeveless sweater. from Sydney Royal Easter Show

    SHOW LESS
    1. 24
      Knitted fabric Knitted fabrics are the third major class of fabric, after woven and nonwoven fabrics.
    1. 24

      Knitted fabrics are the third major class of fabric, after woven and nonwoven fabrics.

      SHOW LESS

    How Knitting
    Connects To Knitted fabric

    • Hand knitting is a special case of knitting, in which the knitted fabric is produced by hand. from Hand knitting

    • In knitted fabrics, selvages are the unfinished yet structurally sound edges that were neither cast on nor bound off. Historically, the term selvage applied only to loom woven fabric, though now can be applied to flat-knitted fabric. from Selvage

    1. 25
      Slip-stitch knitting Slip-stitch knitting is a family of knitting techniques that use slip stitches to make multiple fabrics…
    1. 25

      Slip-stitch knitting is a family of knitting techniques that use slip stitches to make multiple fabrics simultaneously, to make extra-long stitches, and/or to carry over colors from an earlier row.

      SHOW LESS

    How Knitting
    Connects To Slip-stitch knitting

    • The ability to work from either end of one needle is convenient in several types of knitting, such as slip-stitch versions of double knitting. from Knitting

    • More complicated techniques permit large fields of color (intarsia, for example), busy small-scale patterns of color (such as Fair Isle), or both (double knitting and slip-stitch color, for example). from Knitting

    • This is known as slip-stitch knitting. from Knitting

    SHOW MORE
    • Slip-stitch knitting is a family of knitting techniques that use slip stitches to make multiple fabrics simultaneously, to make extra-long stitches, and/or to carry over colors from an earlier row. from Slip-stitch knitting

    SHOW LESS
    1. 26
      Pill (textile) A pill, colloquially known as a bobble, is a small ball of fibres that forms on a piece of cloth. 'Pill' is also a…
    1. 26

      A pill, colloquially known as a bobble, is a small ball of fibres that forms on a piece of cloth. 'Pill' is also a verb for the formation of such balls.
      Textile authorities say consumers can prevent or postpone pilling of their fabrics by treating them with chemical soil release treatments that make the surface of…

      SHOW MORE

      A pill, colloquially known as a bobble, is a small ball of fibres that forms on a piece of cloth. 'Pill' is also a verb for the formation of such balls.
      Pilling is a surface defect of textiles caused by wear, and is considered unsightly. It happens when washing and wearing of fabrics causes loose fibres to begin to push out from the surface of the cloth, and, over time, abrasion causes the fibres to develop into small spherical bundles, anchored to the surface of the fabric by protruding fibres that haven't broken. The textile industry divides pilling into four stages: fuzz formation, entanglement, growth, and wear-off. Pilling normally happens on the parts of clothing that receive the most abrasion in day-to-day wear, such as the collar, cuffs, and around the thighs and rear on trousers.
      All fabrics pill to some extent, although fibres such as linen and silk pill less than most. The primary drivers of pilling are the physical characteristics of the textile (including both the initial fibre, and the way in which it is processed during manufacturing), the personal habits of the textile's wearer, and the environment in which the textile is used. Fibres such as wool, cotton, polyester, nylon and acrylic have a tendency to pill the most, but wool pilling diminishes over time as non-tenacious wool fibres work themselves free of the fabric and break away, whereas pilling of synthetic textiles is a more serious problem, because the stronger fibres hold onto the pills and don't allow pills to fall off.
      In general longer fibres pill less than short ones because there are fewer ends of fibres, and because it is harder for the longer fibres to work themselves out of the cloth. Fabrics with a large number of loose fibres have a higher tendency to pill. Also, knitted fabrics tend to pill more than woven fabrics, because of the greater distance between yarn crossings in knitted fabrics than in woven ones. For the same reason, a tightly knitted object will pill less than a loosely knitted one. When a fabric is made of a blend of fibres where one fibre is significantly stronger than the other, pills tend to form as the weaker fibre wears and breaks, and the stronger fibre holds the pills onto the cloth.
      Techniques used by the textile industry to avoid pilling include singeing the loose fibres protruding on the surface of textile, and spinning the yarn with a high number of twists per inch. Some fabrics are chemically treated during the manufacturing process in order to reduce their propensity to pill. Polymeric coatings are sometimes applied, to bind fibres into the fabric surface and prevent initial fuzz from forming. Polyester and cotton fibres are sometimes modified to be of lower-than-normal strength, which results in pills detaching easily from fabrics, once they are formed. Cellulase enzymes are sometimes used on cotton fabrics during wet processing, which removes loose fibres.
      Textile authorities say consumers can prevent or postpone pilling of their fabrics by treating them with chemical soil release treatments that make the surface of the fabric more hydrophilic, and by turning clothes inside out before washing them. Washing in laundry detergent containing enzymes will get rid of pills on cotton clothing.
      Pills do not interfere with the functionality of the textile, unless a spot with a lot of pills turns into a hole in the fabric. This is because both pills and holes are caused by the fabric wearing—a pill is fibre that was in the cloth. After the pill forms the fabric is thinner there, increasing the likelihood that a hole will form.
      Pilling can seriously compromise a textile's acceptability for consumers, and is the focus of significant industry research. In the textile industry, severity of pilling is objectively evaluated using five parameters: pill number, the mean area of pilling; the total area of pilling; contrast, and density.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To Pill (textile)

    • A yarn's usefulness for a knitting project is judged by several factors, such as its loft (its ability to trap air), its resilience (elasticity under tension), its washability and colorfastness, its hand (its feel, particularly softness vs. scratchiness), its durability against abrasion, its resistance to pilling, its hairiness (fuzziness), its tendency to twist or untwist, its overall weight and drape, its blocking and felting qualities, its comfort (breathability, moisture absorption, wicking properties) and of course its look, which includes its color, sheen, smoothness and ornamental features. from Knitting

    1. 27
      Dyeing Dyeing is the process of adding color to textile products like fibers, yarns, and fabrics. Dyeing is normally done…
    1. 27

      Dyeing is the process of adding color to textile products like fibers, yarns, and fabrics. Dyeing is normally done in a special solution containing dyes and particular chemical material. After dyeing, dye molecules have uncut chemical bond with fiber molecules. The temperature and time controlling are two key factors in dyeing. There are mainly two classes of dye, natural and man-made.…

      SHOW MORE

      Dyeing is the process of adding color to textile products like fibers, yarns, and fabrics. Dyeing is normally done in a special solution containing dyes and particular chemical material. After dyeing, dye molecules have uncut chemical bond with fiber molecules. The temperature and time controlling are two key factors in dyeing. There are mainly two classes of dye, natural and man-made.
      The primary source of dye, historically, has generally been nature, with the dyes being extracted from animals or plants. Since the mid-18th century, however, humans have produced artificial dyes to achieve a broader range of colors and to render the dyes more stable to resist washing and general use. Different classes of dyes are used for different types of fiber and at different stages of the textile production process, from loose fibers through yarn and cloth to completed garments.
      Acrylic fibers are dyed with basic dyes, while nylon and protein fibers such as wool and silk are dyed with acid dyes, and polyester yarn is dyed with disperse dyes. Cotton is dyed with a range of dye types, including vat dyes, and modern synthetic reactive and direct dyes.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To Dyeing

    • The dyeing of yarns is a complex art that has a long history. from Knitting

    • Over the years the company expanded into weaving, knitting, dyeing, finishing, coating, textile printing and manufacturing. from Seyntex

    1. 28
      Aran jumper The Aran jumper (Irish Gaelic: Geansaí Árann) is a style of jumper that takes its name from the Aran Islands off…
    1. 28

      The Aran jumper (Irish Gaelic: Geansaí Árann) is a style of jumper that takes its name from the Aran Islands off the west coast of Ireland. A traditional Aran Sweater usually is off white in color similar to a sheep's' wool and is made from 100% wool. One of the most recognisable features of a…

      SHOW MORE

      The Aran jumper (Irish Gaelic: Geansaí Árann) is a style of jumper that takes its name from the Aran Islands off the west coast of Ireland. A traditional Aran Sweater usually is off white in color similar to a sheep's' wool and is made from 100% wool. One of the most recognisable features of a tradition Aran is its cable patterns on the chest. Being made of 100% wool it can retain over 30% of it weight in moisture. Nowadays Lanolin is removed from Aran Jumper but this waxy substance secreted by sheep in this wool gave the jumper it's all weather versatility. Originally the jumpers were knitted using unscoured wool that retained its natural oils (lanolin) which made the garments water-resistant and meant they remained wearable even when wet. It was primarily the wives of the islander who knitted the jumpers before local knitters began selling their produce through initiatives such as Congested Districts Board for Ireland in 1892.
      The jumpers are distinguished by their use of complex textured stitch patterns, several of which are combined in the creation of a single garment. The jumper (or indeed other options such as "pullover" and "jersey") is largely determined by the regional version of English being spoken. In the case of Ireland and Britain and Australia, "jumper" is the standard word with "sweater" mainly found in tourist shops and America. The word used in Irish is geansaí, a Gaelicisation of guernsey which has been re-Anglicised to gansey in Hiberno-English.
      Some stitch patterns have a traditional interpretation, often of religious significance. The honeycomb is a symbol of the hard-working bee. The cable, an integral part of the Aran islander's daily life, is said to be a wish for safety and good luck when fishing. The diamond is a wish of success, wealth and treasure. The basket stitch represents the basket, a hope for a plentiful catch.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To Aran jumper

    • Changing the order of stitches from one row to the next, usually with the help of a cable needle or stitch holder, is key to cable knitting, producing an endless variety of cables, honeycombs, ropes, and Aran sweater patterning. from Knitting

    • Cables patterns tend to draw the fabric together, making it denser and less elastic; Aran sweaters are a common form of knitted cabling. from Knitting

    • Originally the jumpers were knitted using unscoured wool that retained its natural oils (lanolin) which made the garments water-resistant and meant they remained wearable even when wet. from Aran jumper

    SHOW MORE
    • In 1952 he acquired a company Galway Bay Products Ltd. from a Dublin client Norman Baillie-Stewart, to develop, market and export hand-knitted Aran Islands's knitwear, pioneering in the later 1950s and early 1960s the big sales boom of Aran sweaters and cardigans to the United States and Canada, later adding a similar range of County Wexford Loch Garman handknits, expanding his markets further in the 1970s to include Europe, Australia, and, significantly, Japan. from P. A. Ó Síocháin

    • Another, Pádraig Ó Síocháin, a Dublin author and lawyer, learning to speak Gaelic to the fluency of an islander became inextricably linked to the Aran handknitters and their Aran Sweaters, extensively promoting their popularity and sale around the world for nearly forty years. from Aran Islands

    • The knitting style used to create Aran sweaters is often mistakenly associated with the Isle of Arran rather than the Irish Aran Islands. from Isle of Arran

    SHOW LESS
    1. 29
      English knitting English knitting, also known as right-hand knitting or throwing, is a style of Western knitting where the yarn to…
    1. 29

      English knitting, also known as right-hand knitting or throwing, is a style of Western knitting where the yarn to be knit into the fabric is carried in the right hand. This style is prevalent throughout the English-speaking world, though it is by no means universal.…

      SHOW MORE

      English knitting, also known as right-hand knitting or throwing, is a style of Western knitting where the yarn to be knit into the fabric is carried in the right hand. This style is prevalent throughout the English-speaking world, though it is by no means universal.
      Other Western knitting styles include continental knitting (also known as "left-hand knitting") and combined knitting. Despite the names, choice of knitting style has little to do with the handedness of the knitter; plenty of left-handed individuals use the English style, and plenty of right-handed knitters use Continental. Various non-Western styles also exist, many of which are substantially similar to these, but which twist each stitch, making for a subtly different-looking fabric.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To English knitting

    • Most Western-style knitters follow either the English style (in which the yarn is held in the right hand) or the Continental style (in which the yarn is held in the left hand). from Knitting

    • During the 1940s, English knitting rose in popularity while Continental knitting fell. from Knitting

    • English knitting, also known as right-hand knitting or throwing, is a style of Western knitting where the yarn to be knit into the fabric is carried in the right hand. from English knitting

    1. 30
      Plying In the textile arts, plying is a process used to create a strong, balanced yarn. It is done by taking two or more…
    1. 30

      In the textile arts, plying is a process used to create a strong, balanced yarn. It is done by taking two or more strands of yarn that each have a twist to them and putting them together. The strands are twisted together, in the direction opposite that in which they were spun. When just the…

      SHOW MORE

      In the textile arts, plying is a process used to create a strong, balanced yarn. It is done by taking two or more strands of yarn that each have a twist to them and putting them together. The strands are twisted together, in the direction opposite that in which they were spun. When just the right amount of twist is added, this creates a balanced yarn, which is a yarn with no tendency to twist upon itself. Almost all store bought yarns are balanced, plied yarns.
      A two-ply is thus a yarn plied from two strands, a six-ply is one from six strands, and so on. Most commercial yarns are more than a two ply. Embroidery floss is generally a six ply yarn, for example.
      The creation of two-ply yarn requires two separate spools of singles and either a lazy kate or something to hold the spools in place. On a wheel, two-ply is created by taking two spools of singles, placing them on a lazy kate, tying the ends together onto the spool attached to the wheel, and spinning the wheel in the opposite direction that the singles were spun in while also feeding it onto the spool on the wheel. On a drop spindle, two-ply is created by placing the spools on a lazy kate, tying the ends together onto the drop spindle, holding equal lengths of singles together and dropping the spindle. The weight of the drop spindle combined with the twist in the singles, causes the drop spindle to turn in the opposite direction that the singles were twisted in until the two singles are plied together.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To Plying

    • A single spun yarn may be knitted as is, or braided or plied with another. from Knitting

    • The purpose of plying singles is to strengthen them so that they do not break while knitting or crocheting them. from Plying

    1. 31
      Entrelac Entrelac is a knitting technique used to create a textured diamond pattern. While the result resembles basket-woven…
    1. 31

      Entrelac is a knitting technique used to create a textured diamond pattern. While the result resembles basket-woven strips of knitted fabric, the actual material comprises interconnected squares on two different orientations.…

      SHOW MORE

      Entrelac is a knitting technique used to create a textured diamond pattern. While the result resembles basket-woven strips of knitted fabric, the actual material comprises interconnected squares on two different orientations.
      Unlike many textured knitting techniques, Entrelac allows for colorwork as well. Though single-color entrelac is the norm, it is often used to create colored patterns. The use of variegated yarn with long color repeats for entrelac has become commonplace, since careful use can create distinct squares of color with only one yarn. Entrelac can be knit flat (back-and-forth) or in the round for a cylinder, as for the hat at right. However, unlike typical round knitting, the knitting is turned after a full round of squares so the next set is knitted in the opposite direction.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To Entrelac

    • Entrelac forms a rich checkerboard texture by knitting small squares, picking up their side edges, and knitting more squares to continue the piece. from Knitting

    • New wales can be begun from any of the edges of a knitted fabric; this is known as picking up stitches and is the basis for entrelac, in which the wales run perpendicular to one another in a checkerboard pattern. from Knitting

    • Entrelac is a knitting technique used to create a textured diamond pattern. from Entrelac

    1. 32
      Welting (knitting) In knitting, welting is the horizontal analog of ribbing; that is, one or more horizontal rows of knit stitches…
    1. 32

      In knitting, welting is the horizontal analog of ribbing; that is, one or more horizontal rows of knit stitches alternating with one or more rows of purl stitches.…

      SHOW MORE

      In knitting, welting is the horizontal analog of ribbing; that is, one or more horizontal rows of knit stitches alternating with one or more rows of purl stitches.
      The simplest welting is garter stitch, in which knit rows alternate with purl rows. If the fabric is produced "in the round", the effect is simply produced by knitting one row, then purling the next. If the fabric is being knit back-and-forth, turned after every row, the effect is produced even more simply by knitting each row—first from the right side, then from the wrong side.
      Similar to ribbing, a welting pattern can be specified by the number of knit rows followed by the number of purl rows, e.g., 1x1 welting is garter stitch. Many complicated patterns of purely horizontal stripes are possible, which can be worked in yarns of different color, thickness and texture for added visual interest, e.g., wide stripes of red chenille alternating with narrow stripes of black worsted wool.
      Welts can be decorated with nearly any motif used for a plain knitted fabric, e.g., bobbles, lace, and various colors. However, cables cannot be made horizontally; if desired, cables must be worked as a separate piece.
      A tuck can be created when a previous row is knit together, stitch by stitch, with the present row, forming a round ridge that projects outwards towards the right side. Used as a decorative detail.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To Welting (knitting)

    • Stitches can be worked from either side, and various patterns are created by mixing regular knit stitches with the "wrong side" stitches, known as purl stitches, either in columns (ribbing), rows (garter, welting), or more complex patterns. from Knitting

    • The merged stitches need not be from the same row; for example, a tuck can be formed by knitting stitches together from two different rows, producing a raised horizontal welt on the fabric. from Knitting

    • For example, a common choice is 2x2 ribbing, in which two wales of knit stitches are followed by two wales of purl stitches, etc. Horizontal striping (welting) is also possible, by alternating rows of knit and purl stitches. from Knitting

    SHOW MORE
    • In knitting, welting is the horizontal analog of ribbing; that is, one or more horizontal rows of knit stitches alternating with one or more rows of purl stitches. from Welting (knitting)

    SHOW LESS
    1. 33
      Ravelry Ravelry is a free social networking service, beta-launched in May 2007. It functions as an organizational tool for…
    1. 33

      Ravelry is a free social networking service, beta-launched in May 2007. It functions as an organizational tool for a variety of fiber arts including knitting, crocheting, spinning, and weaving. Members share projects, ideas, and their collection of yarn, fiber, and tools via various components. As of February 27, 2014, Ravelry had over 4 million members worldwide.

      SHOW LESS

    How Knitting
    Connects To Ravelry

    • For individual hobbyists, websites such as Etsy, and Ravelry have made it easy to sell patterns on a small scale, in a way similar to eBay. from Knitting

    • Additionally, many contemporary knitters have an interest in blogging about their knitting, patterns, and techniques, or joining a virtual community focused on knitting, such as the extremely popular Ravelry. from Knitting

    • It functions as an organizational tool for a variety of fiber arts including knitting, crocheting, spinning, and weaving. from Ravelry

    1. 34
      Continental knitting Knitting with the yarn in one's left hand is commonly referred to as Continental knitting, German knitting…
    1. 34

      Knitting with the yarn in one's left hand is commonly referred to as Continental knitting, German knitting, European knitting, or left-hand knitting. Unlike English knitting, the yarn is held in the left hand; the motion of bringing the yarn forward with a knitting needle held in the other hand is thus sometimes known as picking.…

      SHOW MORE

      Knitting with the yarn in one's left hand is commonly referred to as Continental knitting, German knitting, European knitting, or left-hand knitting. Unlike English knitting, the yarn is held in the left hand; the motion of bringing the yarn forward with a knitting needle held in the other hand is thus sometimes known as picking. Continental knitting can be done at a greater rate than English knitting, as the stitches are formed closer to the needle points and the yarn has a shorter travel.
      Although the general appearance of fabrics produced by Continental and English techniques is the same, there are subtle differences. the stitches are more square and the fabric is closer when knitted Continental style. Mary Thomas estimates that the difference can be the equivalent of two needle sizes.
      Other knitting styles include English knitting (aka right-hand knitting) and Combined knitting.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To Continental knitting

    • Most Western-style knitters follow either the English style (in which the yarn is held in the right hand) or the Continental style (in which the yarn is held in the left hand). from Knitting

    • During the 1940s, English knitting rose in popularity while Continental knitting fell. from Knitting

    1. 35
      Qiviut Qiviuq [sg] or qiviut [pl] (/ˈkɪviət/ KIV-ee-ət; Inuktitut syllabics, ᕿᕕᐅᖅ; Inuinnaqtun, qiviuq; Inupiaq qiviu or…
    1. 35

      Qiviuq [sg] or qiviut [pl] (/ˈkɪviət/ KIV-ee-ət; Inuktitut syllabics, ᕿᕕᐅᖅ; Inuinnaqtun, qiviuq; Inupiaq qiviu or qiviuq sometimes spelled qiveut) is an Inuktitut word commonly used to indicate the wool of the muskox. The word was originally used to refer to the down feathers of birds as well as the inner wool of the muskox. It…

      SHOW MORE

      Qiviuq [sg] or qiviut [pl] (/ˈkɪviət/ KIV-ee-ət; Inuktitut syllabics, ᕿᕕᐅᖅ; Inuinnaqtun, qiviuq; Inupiaq qiviu or qiviuq sometimes spelled qiveut) is an Inuktitut word commonly used to indicate the wool of the muskox. The word was originally used to refer to the down feathers of birds as well as the inner wool of the muskox. It is valued for its use as a fiber as, unlike sheep's wool, it does not shrink in water at any temperature. (However, this means that it also is not useful for felting.) It is most commonly used for hats and scarves, and is among the softest wools. It is very expensive; a high quality knitted scarf can cost more than 300 U.S. dollars, but will last over 20 years with good care.
      The muskox has a two-layered coat, and qiviut refers specifically to the soft underwool beneath the longer outer wool. The muskox sheds this layer of wool each spring. Qiviut is plucked from the coat of the muskox during the molt or gathered from objects the animals have brushed against; unlike sheep, the animals are not sheared. Much of the commercially available qiviut comes from Canada, and is obtained from the pelts of muskoxen after hunts. In Alaska, qiviut is obtained from farmed animals or gathered from the wild during the molt.
      Qiviut is stronger and eight times warmer than sheep's wool[citation needed], and softer than cashmere wool. Wild muskoxen have qiviut fibers approximately 18 micrometres in diameter. Females and young animals have slightly finer wool.
      Domestication of the musk ox was begun with the Musk Ox Project, headed by John J. Teal, Jr with the first domestic musk ox farm in Fairbanks. The project continues at the Musk Ox farm in Palmer, Alaska. Oomingmak, the Musk Ox Producers' Cooperative, was formed in the late 1960s by Native women on Nunivak Island, with the help of Dr. Teal and Mrs. L. Schell. It is a knitting cooperative that works with qiviut and is still in operation today. The cooperative has its headquarters in Anchorage and is owned by approximately 200 native Alaskans from many remote villages in Alaska. The name of the cooperative comes from an Inupiaq word, umiŋmak, "the animal with skin like a beard."

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To Qiviut

    • Animal fibers include silk, but generally are long hairs of animals such as sheep (wool), goat (angora, or cashmere goat), rabbit (angora), llama, alpaca, dog, cat, camel, yak, and muskox (qiviut). from Knitting

    1. 36
      Elizabeth Zimmermann Elizabeth Zimmermann (August 9, 1910 – November 30, 1999) was a British-born knitter known for revolutionizing the…
    1. 36

      Elizabeth Zimmermann (August 9, 1910 – November 30, 1999) was a British-born knitter known for revolutionizing the modern practice of knitting through her books and instructional series on American public television.…

      SHOW MORE

      Elizabeth Zimmermann (August 9, 1910 – November 30, 1999) was a British-born knitter known for revolutionizing the modern practice of knitting through her books and instructional series on American public television.
      Though knitting back and forth on rigid straight needles was the norm, she advocated knitting in the round using flexible circular needles to produce seamless garments and to make it easier to knit intricate patterns. She also advocated the Continental knitting method, claiming that it is the most efficient and quickest way to knit. During World War II, German or continental knitting fell out of favor in the UK and US due to its association with Germany. Many English-language books on knitting are in the English or American style. Elizabeth Zimmermann helped to re-introduce continental style knitting to the United States.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To Elizabeth Zimmermann

    • Zimmermann, Elizabeth. from Knitting

    • Elizabeth Zimmermann is probably the best-known proponent of seamless or circular knitting techniques. from Knitting

    • It wasn't until Elizabeth Zimmermann publicized continental knitting in the 1980s that it again was popularized. from Knitting

    SHOW MORE
    • Elizabeth Zimmermann (August 9, 1910 – November 30, 1999) was a British-born knitter known for revolutionizing the modern practice of knitting through her books and instructional series on American public television. from Elizabeth Zimmermann

    SHOW LESS
    1. 37
      Selvage (knitting) The selvage of a knitted fabric consists of the stitch(es) that end each row ("course") of knitting. Also called…
    1. 37

      The selvage of a knitted fabric consists of the stitch(es) that end each row ("course") of knitting. Also called selvedge, the term derives from "self-edge". The selvage may be considered finished; it may also be used in seaming garments, or finished and reinforced using crochet or other techniques. There are many methods for producing selvages.

      SHOW LESS

    How Knitting
    Connects To Selvage (knitting)

    • The side edges are known as the selvages; the word derives from "self-edges", meaning that the stitches do not need to be secured by anything else. from Knitting

    • In knitted fabrics, selvages are the unfinished yet structurally sound edges that were neither cast on nor bound off. Historically, the term selvage applied only to loom woven fabric, though now can be applied to flat-knitted fabric. from Selvage

    1. 38
      Nålebinding Nålebinding (Danish: literally "binding with a needle" or "needle-binding", also naalbinding, nålbinding or…
    1. 38

      Nålebinding (Danish: literally "binding with a needle" or "needle-binding", also naalbinding, nålbinding or naalebinding) is a fabric creation technique predating both knitting and crochet. Also known in English as "knotless netting," "knotless knitting," [1] or "single needle knitting," the technique is distinct from crochet in that it involves passing the full…

      SHOW MORE

      Nålebinding (Danish: literally "binding with a needle" or "needle-binding", also naalbinding, nålbinding or naalebinding) is a fabric creation technique predating both knitting and crochet. Also known in English as "knotless netting," "knotless knitting," [1] or "single needle knitting," the technique is distinct from crochet in that it involves passing the full length of the working thread through each loop, unlike crochet where the work is formed only of loops, never involving the free end. It also differs from knitting in that lengths must be pieced together during the process of nålebinding, rather than a continuous strand of yarn that can easily be pulled out. Archaeological specimens of fabric made by nålebinding can be difficult to distinguish from knitted fabric.
      Nålebinding is still practiced by women of the Nanti tribe, an indigenous people of the Camisea region of Peru. They use it to make bracelets. Nålebinding also remains popular in the Scandinavian countries as well as in the Balkans.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To Nålebinding

    • Nålebinding (Danish: literally "binding with a needle" or "needle-binding") is a fabric creation technique predating both knitting and crochet. from Knitting

    • Nålebinding (Danish: literally "binding with a needle" or "needle-binding", also naalbinding, nålbinding or naalebinding) is a fabric creation technique predating both knitting and crochet. from Nålebinding

    1. 39
      Synthetic fiber Synthetic fibers are the result of extensive research by scientists to improve on naturally occurring animal and…
    1. 39

      Synthetic fibers are the result of extensive research by scientists to improve on naturally occurring animal and plant fibers. In general, synthetic fibers are created by forcing, usually through extrusion, fiber forming materials through holes (called spinnerets) into the air, forming a thread. Before synthetic fibers were developed, artificially manufactured fibers were made from cellulose, which comes from plants. These fibers are called cellulose fibers.

      SHOW LESS

    How Knitting
    Connects To Synthetic fiber

    • The spun fibers are generally divided into animal fibers, plant and synthetic fibers. from Knitting

    1. 40
      Needlepoint Needlepoint is a form of counted thread embroidery in which yarn is stitched through a stiff open weave canvas…
    1. 40

      Needlepoint is a form of counted thread embroidery in which yarn is stitched through a stiff open weave canvas. Most needlepoint designs completely cover the canvas. Although needlepoint may be worked in a variety of stitches, many needlepoint designs use only a simple tent stitch and rely upon color changes in the yarn to construct the pattern.…

      SHOW MORE

      Needlepoint is a form of counted thread embroidery in which yarn is stitched through a stiff open weave canvas. Most needlepoint designs completely cover the canvas. Although needlepoint may be worked in a variety of stitches, many needlepoint designs use only a simple tent stitch and rely upon color changes in the yarn to construct the pattern.
      The degree of detail in needlepoint depends on the thread count of the underlying mesh fabric. Needlepoint worked on fine canvas is known as petit point. Due to the inherent stiffness of needlepoint, common uses include wall hangings, pillows, upholstery, holiday ornaments, purses and eyeglass cases.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To Needlepoint

    • Similar to quilting, spinning, and needlepoint, knitting became a leisure activity for the wealthy. from Knitting

    • Kaffe Fassett (born 1937) (rhymes with 'safe asset' ) is an American-born artist who is best known for his colourful designs in the decorative arts—needlepoint, patchwork, knitting, painting and ceramics. from Kaffe Fassett

    • She participated in several Galesburg All-City Championships, while her other hobbies included bowling, contract bridge, knitting, needlepoint and watching sports, especially the National Basketball Association games. from Dorothy Naum

    1. 41
      Grafting (knitting) In knitting, grafting is the joining of two knitted fabrics using yarn and a needle in one of three types of…
    1. 41

      In knitting, grafting is the joining of two knitted fabrics using yarn and a needle in one of three types of seams:
      The Kitchener stitch is a common method for the third type of seam.

      SHOW LESS

    How Knitting
    Connects To Grafting (knitting)

    • Crochet hooks and a darning needle are often useful in binding/casting off or in joining two knitted pieces edge-to-edge. from Knitting

    • In knitting certain articles of clothing, especially larger ones like sweaters, the final knitted garment will be made of several knitted pieces, with individual sections of the garment knit separately and then sewn together. from Knitting

    • Two knitted fabrics can be joined by embroidery-based grafting methods, most commonly the Kitchener stitch. from Knitting

    1. 42
      Combined knitting Combined knitting or combination knitting is a style that combines elements of Eastern-style knitting with the…
    1. 42

      Combined knitting or combination knitting is a style that combines elements of Eastern-style knitting with the Western techniques. The name was suggested by Mary Thomas in her 1938 book "Mary Thomas's Knitting Book", where she described the technique as "This is the better way to work in Flat Knitting. The resulting fabric is more even…

      SHOW MORE

      Combined knitting or combination knitting is a style that combines elements of Eastern-style knitting with the Western techniques. The name was suggested by Mary Thomas in her 1938 book "Mary Thomas's Knitting Book", where she described the technique as "This is the better way to work in Flat Knitting. The resulting fabric is more even and closer in construction." By wrapping the yarn the opposite way while purling, the knitter changes the orientation of the resulting loops; then the next row's knit stitches can be formed by inserting the needle from the right (as in Eastern knitting), rather than from the left. The needle is always inserted from the right, whether knitting or purling. This technique is suitable for all knitted fabrics from the basic Stockinette stitch, to any other style, such as Fair Isle, circular knitting, or lace knitting.
      The basic adaptation necessary is to substitute "ssk" when directed to "k 2 tog", and vice versa, to orient the slant of the decrease correctly. Most American and European knitting patterns are currently not written to accommodate the needs of Combined knitters. The responsibility rests with the individual knitter to have gained sufficient working knowledge of the changes necessary to convert pattern elements before attempting the entire project, in order for the design to be knitted successfully.
      Knitting instructors unfamiliar with this technique will encounter difficulties teaching classes with students using this technique. Proper terminology is essential in assisting teachers to provide adequate instruction to these students. Teachers should familiarize themselves with the works of Annie Modesitt and Anna Zilboorg, among others.
      Other basic knitting techniques include English knitting (or "right-hand" knitting) and Continental knitting (or "left-hand" knitting).

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To Combined knitting

    • A third method, called combination knitting, goes through the front of a knit stitch and the back of a purl stitch. from Knitting

    • Combined knitting or combination knitting is a style that combines elements of Eastern-style knitting with the Western techniques. from Combined knitting

    1. 43
      Yarn weight Yarn weight refers to the thickness of yarn used by knitters, weavers, crocheters and other fiber artists. Changing…
    1. 43

      Yarn weight refers to the thickness of yarn used by knitters, weavers, crocheters and other fiber artists. Changing yarn weight or needle size can have a significant impact on the finished project, so standardized systems have been spread about, as well as conversion systems for regional standards (especially needle sizes).Yarn weight is important in achieving…

      SHOW MORE

      Yarn weight refers to the thickness of yarn used by knitters, weavers, crocheters and other fiber artists. Changing yarn weight or needle size can have a significant impact on the finished project, so standardized systems have been spread about, as well as conversion systems for regional standards (especially needle sizes).Yarn weight is important in achieving the correct gauge or tension for a particular project and can help with yarn substitution. The Craft Yarn Council of America has developed a system that seeks to standardize the labeled weights of yarn. Most yarns state their weight on the ball band. Some brands use a standardized numbering system that uses 7 ranges of relative thickness of yarn.
      One way of determining the weight of an unknown yarn is to use the wrapping method.
      Wrap the yarn around a large needle or a ruler. Make sure the yarn lies flat. Push the yarn together so there are no gaps between wraps. Smooth it out so it is neither too loose nor too tight. Measure the number of wraps per inch (2.5 cm). For better accuracy, measure the wraps at the center of your yarn sample.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To Yarn weight

    • The thickness or weight of the yarn is a significant factor in determining the gauge/tension, i.e., how many stitches and rows are required to cover a given area for a given stitch pattern. from Knitting

    • Skeins and balls are generally sold with a yarn-band, a label that describes the yarn's weight, length, dye lot, fiber content, washing instructions, suggested needle size, likely gauge/tension, etc. from Knitting

    • Yarn weight refers to the thickness of yarn used by knitters, weavers, crocheters and other fiber artists. from Yarn weight

    1. 44
      Fiber art Fiber art refers to fine art whose material consists of natural or synthetic fiber and other components, such as…
    1. 44

      Fiber art refers to fine art whose material consists of natural or synthetic fiber and other components, such as fabric or yarn. It focuses on the materials and on the manual labour on the part of the artist as part of the works' significance, and prioritizes aesthetic value over utility.

      SHOW LESS

    How Knitting
    Connects To Fiber art

    • Knitting and crochet are common methods of twisting and shaping the yarn into garments or fabric. from Fiber art

    • Yarn weight refers to the thickness of yarn used by knitters, weavers, crocheters and other fiber artists. from Yarn weight

    • Mathematical ideas have been used as inspiration for a number of fiber arts including quilt making, knitting, cross-stitch, crochet, embroidery and weaving. from Mathematics and fiber arts

    1. 45
      Bobble (knitting) In knitting, a bobble is a localized set of stitches forming a raised bump. The bumps are usually arranged in a…
    1. 45

      In knitting, a bobble is a localized set of stitches forming a raised bump. The bumps are usually arranged in a regular geometrical pattern (e.g., a hexagonal grid) or may be figurative, e.g., represent apples on a knitted tree.…

      SHOW MORE

      In knitting, a bobble is a localized set of stitches forming a raised bump. The bumps are usually arranged in a regular geometrical pattern (e.g., a hexagonal grid) or may be figurative, e.g., represent apples on a knitted tree.
      The basic idea of a bobble is to increase into a single stitch, knit a few short rows, then decrease back to a single stitch. However, this leaves many choices: how to increase and how many stitches, how many short rows to work, and how to decrease.
      A bobble can also be a yarn Pom-pon used to decorate knitted items such as Bobble hats.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To Bobble (knitting)

    • Examples include various types of bobbles, sequins and beads. from Knitting

    • In knitting, a bobble is a localized set of stitches forming a raised bump. from Bobble (knitting)

    • Some tea cosies are hand-knitted, resembling woollen hats, some even feature a bobble on top, which may also serve as a handle to remove or lift the tea cosy. from Tea cosy

    1. 46
      Finger knitting Finger knitting is a form of knitting where a knitted cord is created using only hands and fingers during the…
    1. 46

      Finger knitting is a form of knitting where a knitted cord is created using only hands and fingers during the entire process, instead of knitting needles or other traditional tools.

      SHOW LESS

    How Knitting
    Connects To Finger knitting

    • There is also such a thing as finger knitting. from Knitting

    • Finger knitting is a form of knitting where a knitted cord is created using only hands and fingers during the entire process, instead of knitting needles or other traditional tools. from Finger knitting

    1. 47
      Elongated stitch In knitting, an elongated stitch is a stitch that is longer than others. It may be created by wrapping the yarn…
    1. 47

      In knitting, an elongated stitch is a stitch that is longer than others. It may be created by wrapping the yarn around the righthand needle two or more times, or by placing yarn overs between stitches and dropping them on the next row. Elongation is often used in combination with other stitch techniques that produce…

      SHOW MORE

      In knitting, an elongated stitch is a stitch that is longer than others. It may be created by wrapping the yarn around the righthand needle two or more times, or by placing yarn overs between stitches and dropping them on the next row. Elongation is often used in combination with other stitch techniques that produce textured effects in the fabric, as well as in lace work where it is used to create open areas. Works that involve elongated stitch knitting generally require blocking in order to finish the piece.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To Elongated stitch

    • Individual stitches, or rows of stitches, may be made taller by drawing more yarn into the new loop (an elongated stitch), which is the basis for uneven knitting: a row of tall stitches may alternate with one or more rows of short stitches for an interesting visual effect. from Knitting

    • In knitting, an elongated stitch is a stitch that is longer than others. from Elongated stitch

    1. 48
      Row counter (hand knitting) A row counter for hand knitting is a tally counter for counting rows or courses worked, for counting stitch pattern…
    1. 48

      A row counter for hand knitting is a tally counter for counting rows or courses worked, for counting stitch pattern repetitions, or for counting increases or decreases of the number of stitches in consecutive rows. The first commercially produced one appeared on the market in the 1920s after the general public started regularly knitting from…

      SHOW MORE

      A row counter for hand knitting is a tally counter for counting rows or courses worked, for counting stitch pattern repetitions, or for counting increases or decreases of the number of stitches in consecutive rows. The first commercially produced one appeared on the market in the 1920s after the general public started regularly knitting from unfamiliar printed and complex patterns. Design variations include on-needle barrel-shaped counters for straight-needle work, stitch-marker counters for knitting on double-pointed and circular needles, complex counters which attempted to assist with decreases, increases and lacework, stand-alone hand-held counters in imitation of the hand-tally, pendant counters worn round the neck and online software for iPhones.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To Row counter (hand knitting)

    • For large or complex patterns, it is sometimes difficult to keep track of which stitch should be knit in a particular way; therefore, several tools have been developed to identify the number of a particular row or stitch, including circular stitch markers, hanging markers, extra yarn and row counters. from Knitting

    • A row counter for hand knitting is a tally counter for counting rows or courses worked, for counting stitch pattern repetitions, or for counting increases or decreases of the number of stitches in consecutive rows. from Row counter (hand knitting)

    1. 49
      Acrylic fiber Acrylic fibers are synthetic fibers made from a polymer (polyacrylonitrile) with an average molecular weight of…
    1. 49

      Acrylic fibers are synthetic fibers made from a polymer (polyacrylonitrile) with an average molecular weight of ~100,000, about 1900 monomer units. To be called acrylic in the U.S, the polymer must contain at least 85% acrylonitrile monomer. Typical comonomers are vinyl acetate or methyl acrylate. DuPont created the first acrylic fibers in 1941 and trademarked…

      SHOW MORE

      Acrylic fibers are synthetic fibers made from a polymer (polyacrylonitrile) with an average molecular weight of ~100,000, about 1900 monomer units. To be called acrylic in the U.S, the polymer must contain at least 85% acrylonitrile monomer. Typical comonomers are vinyl acetate or methyl acrylate. DuPont created the first acrylic fibers in 1941 and trademarked them under the name Orlon. Acrylic is also called acrilan fabric. It was first developed in the mid-1940s but was not produced in large quantities until the 1950s. Strong and warm, acrylic fiber is often used for sweaters and tracksuits and as linings for boots and gloves, as well as in furnishing fabrics and carpets. It is manufactured as a filament, then cut into short staple lengths similar to wool hairs, and spun into yarn.
      Modacrylic is a modified acrylic fiber that contains at least 35% and at most 85% acrylonitrile monomer. The comonomers vinyl chloride, vinylidene chloride or vinyl bromide used in modacrylic give the fiber flame retardant properties. End-uses of modacrylic include faux fur, wigs, hair extensions and protective clothing.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Knitting
    Connects To Acrylic fiber

    • Common synthetic fibers include acrylics, polyesters such as dacron and ingeo, nylon and other polyamides, and olefins such as polypropylene. from Knitting

    • Acrylic is the "workhorse" hand-crafting fiber for crafters who knit or crochet; acrylic yarn may be perceived as "cheap" because it is typically priced lower than its natural-fiber counterparts, and because it lacks some of their properties, including softness and the ability to felt or take acid dyes. from Acrylic fiber

    • The jeep cap originally the US Army issued M1941 wool knit cap (Cap, Wool, Knit, M1941) is generally like a toboggan cap (or some sources also describe it as a beanie) with a short, baseball cap-like brim attached to it, made mostly from knitted yarn, originally wool but now more often acrylic. Also sometimes referred to as a "skull cap" due to its popularity with skateboarders (although the term "skull cap" is also used for a variety of completely different caps), or a "Radar cap" due to the cap being made famous by the character Radar O'Reilly from the hit US TV sitcom M*A*S*H. from Jeep cap

    1. 50
      Sock A sock is an item of clothing worn on the feet. The foot is among the heaviest producers of sweat in the body, as…
    1. 50

      A sock is an item of clothing worn on the feet. The foot is among the heaviest producers of sweat in the body, as it can produce over 1 US pint (0.47 l) of perspiration per day. Socks help to absorb this sweat and draw it to areas where air can evaporate the perspiration. In cold environments, socks decrease the risk of frostbite.

      SHOW LESS

    How Knitting
    Connects To Sock

    • These fabrics are usually manufactured on circular knitting machines that would be recognised by conventional knitters as sock machines. from Knitting

    • Circular knitting is employed to create pieces that are circular or tube-shaped, such as hats, socks, mittens, and sleeves. from Knitting

    • Pure cashmere can be dyed and spun into yarns and knitted into jumpers (sweaters), hats, gloves, socks and other clothing, or woven into fabrics then cut and assembled into garments such as outer coats, jackets, trousers (pants), pajamas, scarves, blankets, and other items. from Cashmere wool

Books loading, please wait...
Mediander uses proprietary software that curates millions of interconnected topics to produce the MedianderConnects search results. As with any algorithmic search, anomalous results may occur. If you notice such an anomaly, or have any comments or suggestions, please contact us.