image credit
Alfonso IV of Aragon
Alfonso IV, called the Kind (also the Gentle or the Nice, Catalan: Alfons el Benigne) (2 November 1299 – 24 January 1336) was the King of Aragon and Count of Barcelona (as Alfonso III) from 1327 to his death. He was born in Naples, the second son of James II and Blanche of Anjou. His reign saw the incorporation of the County of Urgell, Duchy of Athens, and Duchy of Neopatria into the Crown of Aragon. MORE
Connected
Topic
Samuel G. Armistead
Samuel Gordon Armistead (August 21, 1927 – August 7, 2013) was a prominent American ethnographer, linguist, folklorist, Historian, Professor emeritus of Spanish and critic of literature. He is considered one of the most notable Hispanist scholars of the second half of the 20th and early 21st century. His studies were especially focused on medieval Spanish language and literature, Hispanic folk literature, comparative literature and folklore. He studied ballads of Spain and North Africa. He excelled also in his studies of minority and archaic (but still existing) languages, such as the Spanish language of the Isleño communities in Louisiana and, especially, the Sephardic Jews' language, Ladino. Armistead was author of a multi-volume series concerning the traditional literature of the Sephardic Jews and is author, co-author, editor, or co-editor of over twenty books and several hundred articles on medieval Spanish literature, modern Hispanic oral literature, and comparative literature. His research fields that have had special impact include early poetry, medieval history, Hispanic dialectology, the Spanish epic and Romance, old and traditional. He conducted numerous field surveys on the language and oral literature of the Sephardic communities of Morocco, the Middle East, rural communities in Portugal,Spain and Israel, and several sites in the United States. In addition, he performed pioneering studies on various genres of Hispanic oral tradition, such as the kharjas, riddles, the paremeología and folktales.
Mediander uses proprietary software that curates millions of interconnected topics to produce the Mediander Topics search results. As with any algorithmic search, anomalous results may occur. If you notice such an anomaly, or have any comments or suggestions, please contact us.