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Martial arts are codified systems and traditions of combat practices, which are practiced for a variety of reasons: self-defense, competition, physical health and fitness, entertainment, as well as mental, physical, and spiritual development.

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Although the term martial art has become associated with the fighting arts of eastern Asia, it was originally referred to the combat systems of Europe as early as the 1550s. The term is derived from Latin, and means "arts of Mars", the Roman god of war. Some authors have argued that fighting arts or fighting systems would be more appropriate on the basis that many martial arts were never "martial" in the sense of being…

…used or created by professional warriors.

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      Karate Karate (空手) (/kəˈrɑːtiː/; Japanese pronunciation: [kaɽate] ( )) is a martial art developed in the Ryukyu Islands in…
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      Karate (空手) (/kəˈrɑːtiː/; Japanese pronunciation: [kaɽate] ( )) is a martial art developed in the Ryukyu Islands in what is now Okinawa, Japan. It developed from the indigenous martial arts of Ryukyu Islands (called te (手), literally "hand"; tii in Okinawan) under the influence of Chinese martial arts, particularly Fujian White Crane. Karate is…

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      Karate (空手) (/kəˈrɑːtiː/; Japanese pronunciation: [kaɽate] ( )) is a martial art developed in the Ryukyu Islands in what is now Okinawa, Japan. It developed from the indigenous martial arts of Ryukyu Islands (called te (手), literally "hand"; tii in Okinawan) under the influence of Chinese martial arts, particularly Fujian White Crane. Karate is now predominantly a striking art using punching, kicking, knee strikes, elbow strikes and open hand techniques such as knife-hands, spear-hands, and palm-heel strikes. Historically and in some modern styles grappling, throws, joint locks, restraints, and vital point strikes are also taught. A karate practitioner is called a karateka (空手家).
      Karate developed in the Ryukyu Kingdom. It was brought to the Japanese mainland in the early 20th century during a time of cultural exchanges between the Japanese and the Chinese. It was systematically taught in Japan after the Taisho era. In 1922 the Japanese Ministry of Education invited Gichin Funakoshi to Tokyo to give a karate demonstration. In 1924 Keio University established the first university karate club in Japan and by 1932, major Japanese universities had karate clubs. In this era of escalating Japanese militarism, the name was changed from 唐手 ("Chinese hand" or "Tang hand") to 空手 ("empty hand") – both of which are pronounced karate – to indicate that the Japanese wished to develop the combat form in Japanese style. After World War II, Okinawa became an important United States military site and karate became popular among servicemen stationed there.
      The martial arts movies of the 1960s and 1970s served to greatly increase the popularity of martial arts around the world, and in English the word karate began to be used in a generic way to refer to all striking-based Oriental martial arts. Karate schools began appearing across the world, catering to those with casual interest as well as those seeking a deeper study of the art.
      Shigeru Egami, Chief Instructor of Shotokan Dojo, opined that "the majority of followers of karate in overseas countries pursue karate only for its fighting techniques ... Movies and television ... depict karate as a mysterious way of fighting capable of causing death or injury with a single blow ... the mass media present a pseudo art far from the real thing." Shoshin Nagamine said, "Karate may be considered as the conflict within oneself or as a life-long marathon which can be won only through self-discipline, hard training and one's own creative efforts."
      In 2009, in the 121st International Olympic Committee voting, karate did not receive the necessary two-thirds majority vote to become an Olympic sport. Karate was being considered for the 2020 Olympics,—however at a meeting of the IOC's executive board, held in Russia on May 29, 2013, it was decided that karate (along with wushu and several other non-martial arts) would not be considered for inclusion in 2020 at the IOC's 125th session in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in September 2013.
      Web Japan (sponsored by the Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs) claims there are 50 million karate practitioners worldwide, while the World Karate Federation claims there are 100 million practitioners around the world./

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    How Martial arts
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    • ( ; ) is a martial art developed in the Ryukyu Islands in what is now Okinawa, Japan. from Karate

    • Kyokushin karate requires advanced practitioners to engage in bare-knuckled, full-contact sparring while wearing only a karate gi and groin protector but does not allow punches to the face, only kicks and knees. from Martial arts

    • In Japan, the same period marks the formation of the modern forms of judo, jujutsu, karate, and kendo (among others) based on revivals of old schools of Edo period martial arts which had been suppressed during the Meiji Restoration. from Martial arts

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    • Japanese jujutsu systems typically emphasis more on throwing, immobilizing and pinning, joint-locking, choking, and strangling techniques as compared with other martial arts systems such as karate. from Jujutsu

    • is a style of karate, developed from various martial arts by Gichin Funakoshi (1868–1957) and his son Gigo (Yoshitaka) Funakoshi (1906–1945). from Shotokan

    • The styles listed below may practice strictly weapons, or may practice another martial arts (usually karate) as well. from Okinawan kobudō

    • Okinawan martial arts refers to the martial arts, such as karate, tegumi and Okinawan kobudō, which originated among the indigenous people of Okinawa Island. from Okinawan martial arts

    • The purpose of the early UFC competitions was to identify the most effective martial art in a real fight between competitors of different fighting disciplines, including Boxing, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Sambo, Wrestling, Muay Thai, Karate, Judo, and other styles. from Ultimate Fighting Championship

    • Passai (拔塞/パッサイ also "Bassai / バッサイ") is the name of a group of kata practiced in different styles of martial arts, including karate and various Korean martial arts (Taekwondo, Tang Soo Do, Soo Bahk Do). from Passai

    • , also Sakugawa Satunushi and Tode Sakugawa, was a Ryūkyūan martial arts master and major contributor to the development of Te, the precursor to modern karate. from Sakugawa Kanga

    • Feeling that the martial arts, particularly karate, were not adapting to meet the needs of a changing world, Shukumine first developed a style of karate called Genseiryū around 1950. from Taidō

    • Martial arts and combat sports that emphasize stand-up fighting include boxing, escrima, jōdō, karate, kendo, kickboxing, kung fu, muay thai, savate, fistfighting, silat and taekwondo. from Stand-up fighting

    • Although Enshin is a "stand-up fighting" style that includes kicks, strikes, and punches found in most other styles of karate, it also utilizes numerous grabs, sweeps, and throws often associated with Judo or other grappling styles of martial arts. from Enshin kaikan

    • was an Okinawan martial artist who developed Shorin-ryū karate based on what he had learned from Ankō Itosu. from Chōshin Chibana

    • The Long Beach International Karate Championships — is an International Karate and martial arts tournament in Long Beach, California that was first held in August 1964 by Kenpo Grandmaster Ed Parker. from Long Beach International Karate Championships

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      Chinese martial arts Chinese martial arts, colloquially referred to as kung fu or gung fu (Chinese: 功夫; pinyin: gōngfu) and wushu…
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      Chinese martial arts, colloquially referred to as kung fu or gung fu (Chinese: 功夫; pinyin: gōngfu) and wushu (simplified Chinese: 武术; traditional Chinese: 武術; pinyin: wǔshù), are a number of fighting styles that have developed over the centuries in China. These fighting styles are often classified according to common traits, identified as "families" (家; jiā),…

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      Chinese martial arts, colloquially referred to as kung fu or gung fu (Chinese: 功夫; pinyin: gōngfu) and wushu (simplified Chinese: 武术; traditional Chinese: 武術; pinyin: wǔshù), are a number of fighting styles that have developed over the centuries in China. These fighting styles are often classified according to common traits, identified as "families" (家; jiā), "sects" (派; pài) or "schools" (門, mén) of martial arts. Examples of such traits include physical exercises involving animal mimicry, or training methods inspired by Chinese philosophies, religions and legends. Styles that focus on qi manipulation are called internal (内家拳; nèijiāquán), while others that concentrate on improving muscle and cardiovascular fitness are called "external" (外家拳; wàijiāquán). Geographical association, as in northern (北拳; běiquán) and "southern" (南拳; nánquán), is another popular classification method.

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    How Martial arts
    Connects To Chinese martial arts

    • Bruce Lee is credited as one of the first instructors to openly teach Chinese martial arts to Westerners. from Martial arts

    • The later 1960s and 1970s witnessed an increased media interest in Chinese martial arts, influenced by martial artist Bruce Lee. from Martial arts

    • Likewise, Asian martial arts become well-documented during the medieval period, Japanese martial arts beginning with the establishment of the samurai nobility in the 12th century, Chinese martial arts with Ming era treatises such as Ji Xiao Xin Shu, Indian martial arts in medieval texts such as the Agni Purana and the Malla Purana, and Korean martial arts from the Joseon era and texts such as Muyejebo (1598). from Martial arts

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    • The foundation of modern Asian martial arts is likely a blend of early Chinese and Indian martial arts. from Martial arts

    • Chinese martial arts originated during the Xia Dynasty more than 4000 years ago. from Martial arts

    • Many Chinese martial arts also feature weapons as part of their curriculum. from Martial arts

    • Martial arts play a prominent role in the literature genre known as wuxia ( ). from Chinese martial arts

    • Yang Luchan (1799–1872) was an important teacher of the internal martial art known as t'ai chi ch'uan in Beijing during the second half of the 19th century. from Chinese martial arts

    • literally means "martial art". from Chinese martial arts

    • Bruce Lee ( ; born Lee Jun-fan, ; November 27, 1940 – July 20, 1973) was a Hong Kong American martial artist, Hong Kong action film actor, martial arts instructor, filmmaker, and the founder of Jeet Kune Do. from Bruce Lee

    • Shaolin Kung Fu ( ), also called Shaolin Wushu ( ) or simply Shaolin quan ( ), is one of the oldest and most famous martial arts . from Shaolin Kung Fu

    • He studied Chuan Fa in China as well as other martial arts and brought what he learned back to Okinawa. from Matsumura Sōkon

    • The traditional martial arts of the Indochinese peninsula are related among one another, and as a group to southern Chinese and Indian martial arts. from Indochinese martial arts

    • In advanced traditional Chinese kung fu (martial arts), Neijing (Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: nèijìng) refers to the conscious control of the practitioner's qi, or "life energy", to gain advantages in combat. from Neijing

    • Martial arts and combat sports that emphasize stand-up fighting include boxing, escrima, jōdō, karate, kendo, kickboxing, kung fu, muay thai, savate, fistfighting, silat and taekwondo. from Stand-up fighting

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      Taekwondo Taekwondo /ˌtaɪˌkwɒnˈdoʊ/ or /ˌteɪˌkwɒnˈdoʊ/ (Korean 태권도 (hangul) / 跆拳道 (hanja), [tʰɛk͈wʌndo]), also known as…
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      Taekwondo /ˌtaɪˌkwɒnˈdoʊ/ or /ˌteɪˌkwɒnˈdoʊ/ (Korean 태권도 (hangul) / 跆拳道 (hanja), [tʰɛk͈wʌndo]), also known as Taekwon-Do and Tae Kwon Do, is a Korean martial art. It combines combat and self-defense techniques with sport and exercise. Gyeorugi (pronounced [kjʌɾuɡi]), a type of sparring, has been an Olympic event since 2000. Taekwondo was developed by a variety of Korean masters during the 1940s as combination of Okinawan karate, Chinese martial arts, and the ancient Korean traditions taekkyeon and gwonbeop.

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    How Martial arts
    Connects To Taekwondo

    • Taekwondo was developed in the context of the Korean War in the 1950s. from Martial arts

    • A common theme in most Korean styles, such as taekkyeon and taekwondo, is the value of "inner peace" in a practitioner, which is stressed to be only achieved through individual meditation and training. from Martial arts

    • What holds true in one organization may not hold true in another, as is the case in many martial art systems. from Taekwondo

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    • Choi Hong Hi (9 November 1918 – 15 June 2002), also known as General Choi, was a South Korean army general and martial artist who is a controversial figure in the history of the Korean martial art of taekwondo. from Choi Hong Hi

    • Original masters of taekwondo is a group of twelve South Korean martial art masters assembled by the Korea Taekwon-Do Association (KTA) in the early 1960s to promote the newly established art of taekwondo. from Original masters of taekwondo

    • A butterfly kick or horse kick (xuànzi 旋子 circle) is a jumping kick in martial arts such as modern wushu and taekwondo and capoeira. from Butterfly kick

    • The name Taekwondo was dropped due to various controversies and Tae Soo Do was chosen to be the new name for their martial art. from Tae Soo Do

    • Tae Kwon Do Times is a magazine devoted to the martial art of taekwondo, and is published in the United States of America. from Tae Kwon Do Times

    • It derived from martial arts forms (Kata, Taolu and more) such as Karate, Capoeira, Wushu, Tae Kwon Do, kalarippayattu incorporating techniques found in gymnastics, break dancing, and similar disciplines. from Tricking (martial arts)

    • Martial arts and combat sports that emphasize stand-up fighting include boxing, escrima, jōdō, karate, kendo, kickboxing, kung fu, muay thai, savate, fistfighting, silat and taekwondo. from Stand-up fighting

    • Rhee Taekwon-Do (리태권도; 李跆拳道), also known as Rhee Tae Kwon-Do, Rhee Tae Kwon Do, or Rhee Taekwondo, is a martial art school in Australia and New Zealand teaching the Korean martial art of taekwondo. from Rhee Taekwon-Do

    • Duk Sung Son (Hangul: 손덕성, Hanja: 孫德成) (June 17, 1922 – March 29, 2011) was a martial artist, Grand Master, 9th degree black belt, Co-Founder of the Korean martial art of Tae Kwon Do, successor of Won Kuk Lee and leader of the Chung Do Kwan school (1950–1959). from Duk Sung Son

    • This martial arts organization specializes in taekwondo, with schools in cities throughout the United States and Europe. from Hee Il Cho

    • She holds six Black belts in various Far Eastern martial disciplines, including Tang Soo Do (also "tangsudo", Korean), Tae Kwon Do (Korean), Eagle Claw (Chinese), Wu Shu (contemporary Chinese), Northern Shaolin (classical Chinese), and Pai Lum Tao Kung Fu (contemporary Chinese). from Cynthia Rothrock

    • Members of the stunt team are skilled in acrobatics and gymnastics, weapons-related fighting arts, Muay Thai and other martial arts including Wushu and Tae Kwon Do. from Muay Thai Stunt

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      Judo Judo (柔道, jūdō, meaning "gentle way") is a modern martial art, combat and Olympic sport created in Japan in 1882 by…
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      Judo (柔道, jūdō, meaning "gentle way") is a modern martial art, combat and Olympic sport created in Japan in 1882 by Jigoro Kano (嘉納治五郎). Its most prominent feature is its competitive element, where the objective is to either throw or takedown an opponent to the ground, immobilize or otherwise subdue an opponent with a pin,…

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      Judo (柔道, jūdō, meaning "gentle way") is a modern martial art, combat and Olympic sport created in Japan in 1882 by Jigoro Kano (嘉納治五郎). Its most prominent feature is its competitive element, where the objective is to either throw or takedown an opponent to the ground, immobilize or otherwise subdue an opponent with a pin, or force an opponent to submit with a joint lock or a choke. Strikes and thrusts by hands and feet as well as weapons defenses are a part of judo, but only in pre-arranged forms (kata, 形) and are not allowed in judo competition or free practice (randori, 乱取り). A judo practitioner is called a judoka.
      The philosophy and subsequent pedagogy developed for judo became the model for other modern Japanese martial arts that developed from koryū (古流, traditional schools). The worldwide spread of judo has led to the development of a number of offshoots such as Sambo and Brazilian jiu-jitsu.

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    How Martial arts
    Connects To Judo

    • The rank system introduced for judo in the 1880s proved commercially viable, and colored-belt systems were adopted in many martial arts degree mills (also known as McDojos) as a means to generate additional cash. from Martial arts

    • He also founded an eclectic style named Bartitsu which combined jujutsu, judo, boxing, savate and stick fighting. from Martial arts

    • In Japan, the same period marks the formation of the modern forms of judo, jujutsu, karate, and kendo (among others) based on revivals of old schools of Edo period martial arts which had been suppressed during the Meiji Restoration. from Martial arts

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    • Common martial arts featuring joint locks include Aikido, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Catch Wrestling, Eskrima, Eagle Claw, Fu Jow Pai, Hapkido, Hung Gar, Jujutsu, Judo, Ninjutsu, Shoot wrestling, and mixed martial arts. from Joint lock

    • The purpose of the early UFC competitions was to identify the most effective martial art in a real fight between competitors of different fighting disciplines, including Boxing, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Sambo, Wrestling, Muay Thai, Karate, Judo, and other styles. from Ultimate Fighting Championship

    • In Judo and other martial arts, there are many classifications of different types of single leg takedowns. from Takedown (grappling)

    • A grappling hold (commonly referred to simply as a hold; in Japanese referred to as katame-waza, , "grappling technique") is a grappling, wrestling, judo or other martial arts term for a specific grip that is applied to an opponent. from Grappling hold

    • Leglocks are featured, with various levels of restrictions, in combat sports and martial arts such as Sambo, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, catch wrestling, mixed martial arts, Shootwrestling and submission wrestling, but are banned in some sports featuring joint locks such as judo. from Leglock

    • Wally Jay (June 16, 1917 – May 29, 2011) was an American martial artist who primarily studied and taught jujutsu and judo. from Wally Jay

    • He was the author of several important books on Asian martial arts, and was a pioneer of international judo in the United States and Japan. from Donn F. Draeger

    • The guillotine choke, also known as Mae Hadaka Jime (前裸絞, "front naked choke"; compare to a rear naked choke) in judo, is a chokehold in martial arts and wrestling applied from in front of the opponent. from Guillotine choke

    • Its main influences include the martial arts of Hapkido, Hakko-ryu Jujutsu, Judo and Kyuk Too Ki (Korean style ThaiBoxing/Shootboxing). from GongKwon Yusul

    • Although Enshin is a "stand-up fighting" style that includes kicks, strikes, and punches found in most other styles of karate, it also utilizes numerous grabs, sweeps, and throws often associated with Judo or other grappling styles of martial arts. from Enshin kaikan

    • Cuong Nhu is a martial art that blends elements of Shotokan, Wing Chun, Judo, Aikido, T'ai chi ch'uan, Vovinam, and Boxing. from Cuong Nhu

    • In early adolescence, he began studying martial arts, beginning with judo, then karate and jiujitsu. from Richard Strozzi-Heckler

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      Jujutsu Jujutsu (/dʒuːˈdʒuːtsuː/; Japanese: 柔術, jūjutsu  listen , Japanese pronunciation: [ˈdʑɯɯ.dʑɯ.tsɯ]) is a Japanese…
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      Jujutsu (/dʒuːˈdʒuːtsuː/; Japanese: 柔術, jūjutsu  listen , Japanese pronunciation: [ˈdʑɯɯ.dʑɯ.tsɯ]) is a Japanese martial art and a method of close combat for defeating an armed and armored opponent in which one uses no weapon or only a short weapon. The word jujutsu can be spelled as ju-jitsu/jujitsu, ju-jutsu.…

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      Jujutsu (/dʒuːˈdʒuːtsuː/; Japanese: 柔術, jūjutsu  listen , Japanese pronunciation: [ˈdʑɯɯ.dʑɯ.tsɯ]) is a Japanese martial art and a method of close combat for defeating an armed and armored opponent in which one uses no weapon or only a short weapon. The word jujutsu can be spelled as ju-jitsu/jujitsu, ju-jutsu.
      "Jū" can be translated to mean "gentle, soft, supple, flexible, pliable, or yielding." "Jutsu" can be translated to mean "art" or "technique" and represents manipulating the opponent's force against himself rather than confronting it with one's own force. Jujutsu developed among the samurai of feudal Japan as a method for defeating an armed and armored opponent in which one uses no weapon, or only a short weapon. Because striking against an armored opponent proved ineffective, practitioners learned that the most efficient methods for neutralizing an enemy took the form of pins, joint locks, and throws. These techniques were developed around the principle of using an attacker's energy against him, rather than directly opposing it.
      There are many variations of the art, which leads to a diversity of approaches. Jujutsu schools (ryū) may utilize all forms of grappling techniques to some degree (i.e. throwing, trapping, joint locks, holds, gouging, biting, disengagements, striking, and kicking). In addition to jujutsu, many schools teach the use of weapons.
      Today, jujutsu is practiced in both traditional and modern sport forms. Derived sport forms include the Olympic sport and martial art of judo, which was developed by Kanō Jigorō in the late 19th century from several traditional styles of jujutsu, and Brazilian jiu-jitsu, which was in turn derived from earlier (pre–World War II) versions of Kodokan judo.

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    How Martial arts
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    • He also founded an eclectic style named Bartitsu which combined jujutsu, judo, boxing, savate and stick fighting. from Martial arts

    • Edward William Barton-Wright, a railway engineer who had studied jujutsu while working in Japan between 1894 and 1897, was the first man known to have taught Asian martial arts in Europe. from Martial arts

    • In Japan, the same period marks the formation of the modern forms of judo, jujutsu, karate, and kendo (among others) based on revivals of old schools of Edo period martial arts which had been suppressed during the Meiji Restoration. from Martial arts

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    • Japanese jujutsu systems typically emphasis more on throwing, immobilizing and pinning, joint-locking, choking, and strangling techniques as compared with other martial arts systems such as karate. from Jujutsu

    • Jujutsu ( ; , ) is a Japanese martial art and a method of close combat for defeating an armed and armored opponent in which one uses no weapon or only a short weapon. from Jujutsu

    • Common martial arts featuring joint locks include Aikido, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Catch Wrestling, Eskrima, Eagle Claw, Fu Jow Pai, Hapkido, Hung Gar, Jujutsu, Judo, Ninjutsu, Shoot wrestling, and mixed martial arts. from Joint lock

    • Ninjutsu was a separate discipline in some traditional Japanese schools, which integrated study of more conventional martial arts along with shurikenjutsu, kenjutsu, sojutsu, bōjutsu, battlefield grappling kumi-uchi (an old form jujutsu) and others. from Ninjutsu

    • Wristlocks are very common in martial arts such as Aikido, Hapkido and jujutsu where they are featured as self-defense techniques. from Wristlock

    • German ju-jutsu is a martial art related to traditional Japanese jujutsu, developed in Germany in the 1960s using techniques from jujutsu, judo, karate and various other traditional and modern martial arts. from German ju-jutsu

    • At the age of 5 years, he began training in the martial art of jujutsu under his great-uncle, Chojiro Ebashi (a samurai). from Hironori Ōtsuka

    • As a martial arts practice, hojojutsu is seldom if ever taught on its own but as part of a curriculum under the aegis of the body of study encompassed by a larger school of bugei or budō, often as an advanced study in jujutsu. from Hojōjutsu

    • Shurikenjutsu was usually taught among the sogo-bugei, or comprehensive martial arts systems of Japan, as a supplemental art to those more commonly practiced such as kenjutsu, sojutsu, bōjutsu and battlefield grappling kumi-uchi (old form jujutsu), and is much less prevalent today than it was in the feudal era. from Shurikenjutsu

    • Wally Jay (June 16, 1917 – May 29, 2011) was an American martial artist who primarily studied and taught jujutsu and judo. from Wally Jay

    • Its main influences include the martial arts of Hapkido, Hakko-ryu Jujutsu, Judo and Kyuk Too Ki (Korean style ThaiBoxing/Shootboxing). from GongKwon Yusul

    • The tambo is used in several martial arts including: jujutsu, aikido, kobudo, hapkido, yoseikan budo, Cuong Nhu. from Tambo (weapon)

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      Bruce Lee Bruce Lee (Chinese: 李小龍; born Lee Jun-fan, Chinese: 李振藩; November 27, 1940 – July 20, 1973) was a Hong Kong…
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      Bruce Lee (Chinese: 李小龍; born Lee Jun-fan, Chinese: 李振藩; November 27, 1940 – July 20, 1973) was a Hong Kong American martial artist, Hong Kong action film actor, martial arts instructor, filmmaker, and the founder of Jeet Kune Do. Lee was the son of Cantonese opera star Lee Hoi-Chuen. He is widely considered by commentators,…

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      Bruce Lee (Chinese: 李小龍; born Lee Jun-fan, Chinese: 李振藩; November 27, 1940 – July 20, 1973) was a Hong Kong American martial artist, Hong Kong action film actor, martial arts instructor, filmmaker, and the founder of Jeet Kune Do. Lee was the son of Cantonese opera star Lee Hoi-Chuen. He is widely considered by commentators, critics, media and other martial artists to be one of the most influential martial artists of all time, and a pop culture icon of the 20th century. He is often credited with helping to change the way Asians were presented in American films.
      Lee was born in Chinatown, San Francisco on November 27, 1940 to parents from Hong Kong and was raised in Kowloon with his family until his late teens. He was introduced to the film industry by his father and appeared in several films as a child actor. Lee moved to the United States at the age of 18 to receive his higher education, at the University of Washington, and it was during this time that he began teaching martial arts. His Hong Kong and Hollywood-produced films elevated the traditional Hong Kong martial arts film to a new level of popularity and acclaim, sparking a surge of interest in Chinese martial arts in the West in the 1970s. The direction and tone of his films changed and influenced martial arts and martial arts films in the United States, Hong Kong and the rest of the world.
      He is noted for his roles in five feature-length films: Lo Wei's The Big Boss (1971) and Fist of Fury (1972); Way of the Dragon (1972), directed and written by Lee; Warner Brothers' Enter the Dragon (1973) and The Game of Death (1973), both directed by Robert Clouse. Lee became an iconic figure known throughout the world, particularly among the Chinese, as he portrayed Chinese nationalism in his films. He initially trained in Wing Chun and Boxing, but later rejected well-defined martial art styles, favouring instead the use of techniques from various sources, in the spirit of his personal martial arts philosophy, which he dubbed Jeet Kune Do (The Way of the Intercepting Fist). Lee held dual nationality of Hong Kong and the United States. He died in Kowloon Tong on July 20, 1973 at the age of 32.

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    How Martial arts
    Connects To Bruce Lee

    • According to Bruce Lee, martial arts also have the nature of an art, since there is emotional communication and complete emotional expression. from Martial arts

    • The later 1960s and 1970s witnessed an increased media interest in Chinese martial arts, influenced by martial artist Bruce Lee. from Martial arts

    • Aside from martial arts and philosophy which focus on the physical aspect and self-consciousness for truths and principles, Lee also wrote poetry that reflected his emotion and a stage in his life collectively. from Bruce Lee

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    • Bruce Lee ( ; born Lee Jun-fan, ; November 27, 1940 – July 20, 1973) was a Hong Kong American martial artist, Hong Kong action film actor, martial arts instructor, filmmaker, and the founder of Jeet Kune Do. from Bruce Lee

    • Jeet Kune Do, also Jeet Kun Do, and abbreviated JKD, is an eclectic and hybrid martial art system and philosophy of life founded by the martial artist Bruce Lee (1940–1973) in 1967 with simple and direct, or straightforward, movements and non-classical style. from Jeet Kune Do

    • Bruceploitation is a cultural phenomenon mostly seen in the 1970s after the 1973 death of martial artist and actor Bruce Lee. from Bruceploitation

    • From 1967 to 1968, he studied privately with the influential martial artist and Jeet Kune Do founder Bruce Lee. from Joe Lewis (martial artist)

    • Ted Wong (November 5, 1937 – November 24, 2010) was a martial arts practitioner best known for studying under Bruce Lee. from Ted Wong

    • Bruce Lee's Fighting Method is a book of volumes covering Bruce Lee's martial arts abilities of the Jeet Kune Do movement. from Bruce Lee's Fighting Method

    • Tao of Jeet Kune Do is a book expressing Bruce Lee's martial arts philosophy and viewpoints, published posthumously (after Bruce Lee's death in 1973). from Tao of Jeet Kune Do

    • Bruce Li ( ) (born Ho Chung-tao June 5, 1950) is a Taiwanese actor, martial artist and Bruce Lee imitator who starred in martial arts films from the Bruceploitation movement. from Bruce Li

    • Robert Lee ( ; born 16 December 1948) is a Hong Kong musician and younger brother of martial artist Bruce Lee. from Robert Lee (musician)

    • The Bruce Lee statue in Hong Kong is a memorial figure of deceased martial artist, Bruce Lee. from Bruce Lee statue in Hong Kong

    • Wong Jack Man (born c.1940 in Hong Kong ) is a Chinese martial artist and martial arts teacher, best known for a martial arts duel with Bruce Lee in Oakland in 1964. from Wong Jack Man

    • The Dragon Lives Again ( , originally released as Li san jiao wei zhen di yu men and also known as Deadly Hands of Kung Fu, is a martial arts fantasy comedy in which the soul of Bruce Lee (played by Bruce Leung Siu-lung) goes to the Underworld. from The Dragon Lives Again

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      Muay Thai Muay Thai (Thai: มวยไทย, RTGS: Muai Thai,  [mūaj.tʰāj] ( )) is a combat sport of Thailand that uses stand-up…
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      Muay Thai (Thai: มวยไทย, RTGS: Muai Thai,  [mūaj.tʰāj] ( )) is a combat sport of Thailand that uses stand-up striking along with various clinching techniques. This physical and mental discipline which includes combat on shins is known as "the art of eight limbs" because it is characterized by the combined use of fists, elbows,…

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      Muay Thai (Thai: มวยไทย, RTGS: Muai Thai,  [mūaj.tʰāj] ( )) is a combat sport of Thailand that uses stand-up striking along with various clinching techniques. This physical and mental discipline which includes combat on shins is known as "the art of eight limbs" because it is characterized by the combined use of fists, elbows, knees, shins , being associated with a good physical preparation that makes a full-contact fighter very efficient. Muay Thai became widespread internationally in the twentieth century, when practitioners defeated notable practitioners of other martial arts. A professional league is governed by the World Muay Thai Council.

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    How Martial arts
    Connects To Muay Thai

    • Modern muay Thai rules date to the 1920s. from Martial arts

    • They are rather contemporary regional sports that coexist with the modern forms of martial arts sports as they have developed since the 19th century, often including cross-fertilization between sports and folk styles; thus, the traditional Thai art of muay boran developed into the modern national sport of muay Thai, which in turn came to be practiced worldwide and contributed significantly to modern hybrid styles like kickboxing and mixed martial arts. from Martial arts

    • The purpose of the early UFC competitions was to identify the most effective martial art in a real fight between competitors of different fighting disciplines, including Boxing, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Sambo, Wrestling, Muay Thai, Karate, Judo, and other styles. from Ultimate Fighting Championship

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    • Martial arts and combat sports that emphasize stand-up fighting include boxing, escrima, jōdō, karate, kendo, kickboxing, kung fu, muay thai, savate, fistfighting, silat and taekwondo. from Stand-up fighting

    • Rob was a good player, but never liked team sports and at the age of 16 he started training in the martial arts, first Pentjak Silat and in 1978 he started training Muay Thai at Mejiro Gym under Jan Plas. from Rob Kaman

    • This type of kick is utilized in numerous full-contact martial arts such as karate, kickboxing, lethwei and muay Thai. from Low kick

    • Members of the stunt team are skilled in acrobatics and gymnastics, weapons-related fighting arts, Muay Thai and other martial arts including Wushu and Tae Kwon Do. from Muay Thai Stunt

    • Its main influences include the martial arts of Hapkido, Hakko-ryu Jujutsu, Judo and Kyuk Too Ki (Korean style ThaiBoxing/Shootboxing). from GongKwon Yusul

    • Peter "The Hurricane" Smit (December 24, 1961 – August 15, 2005) was a Dutch martial artist who mastered such different fight disciplines as kyokushin karate, kickboxing and Muay Thai. from Peter Smit

    • Champions of Champions Elite, or COC-Elite, is a martial arts television show focused on Muay Thai that is currently airing once a month on G4TV. from Champions of Champions Elite

    • Wallace was active in martial arts before transitioning to Muay Thai in 1999. from Crafton Wallace

    • When growing up, he was interested in martial arts but did not start training before turning 21, when his friend introduced him to Muay Thai. from Vitor Miranda

    • Full-contact martial arts include boxing, mixed martial arts, Brazilian jiu-jitsu, Muay Thai, judo, and various forms of full contact karate. Also, kickboxing, in the early 1970s in the United States, was born and introduced a controlled version of full contact to martial arts. from Contact sport

    • The purpose of the event was to identify the most effective martial art in a real stand-up fight between competitors all over the world of different fighting disciplines, including boxing, kickboxing, mixed martial arts, judo, karate, Muay Thai, wrestling, and other styles. from SUPERKOMBAT Fighting Championship

    • Côté started his martial arts training in the Canadian Army at around age of 16, where he took up boxing and subsequently added muay thai, kickboxing and wrestling to his repertoire. from Patrick Côté (fighter)

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      Kickboxing Kickboxing (in Japanese キックボクシング kikkubokushingu) is a group of stand-up combat sports based on kicking and…
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      Kickboxing (in Japanese キックボクシング kikkubokushingu) is a group of stand-up combat sports based on kicking and punching, historically developed from karate, Muay Thai and Western boxing. Kickboxing is practiced for self-defense, general fitness, or as a contact sport.…

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      Kickboxing (in Japanese キックボクシング kikkubokushingu) is a group of stand-up combat sports based on kicking and punching, historically developed from karate, Muay Thai and Western boxing. Kickboxing is practiced for self-defense, general fitness, or as a contact sport.
      Japanese kickboxing originates in the 1960s, with competitions held since then. American kickboxing originates in the early 1970s. Historically, kickboxing can be considered a hybrid martial art formed from the combination of elements of various traditional styles. This approach became increasingly popular since the 1970s, and since the 1990s, kickboxing has contributed to the emergence of mixed martial arts via further hybridization with ground fighting techniques from Brazilian jiu-jitsu and Folk wrestling.
      There is no single international governing body. International governing bodies include International Combat Organisation, World Association of Kickboxing Organizations, World Kickboxing Association, International Sport Karate Association, International Kickboxing Federation, World Sport Kickboxing Federation, among others. Consequently, there is no single kickboxing world championship, and champion titles are issued by individual promotions, such as K-1, Glory, SUPERKOMBAT, Lumpinee Boxing Stadium, among others. Bouts organized under different governing bodies apply different rules, such as allowing the use of knees or clinching, etc.

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    How Martial arts
    Connects To Kickboxing

    • Practitioners in some arts such as kickboxing and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu often train for sport matches, whereas those in other arts such as aikido and Wing Chun generally spurn such competitions. from Martial arts

    • American kickboxing was developed in the 1970s, as a combination of boxing and karate. from Martial arts

    • The term kickboxing (キックボクシング) was created by the Japanese boxing promoter Osamu Noguchi for a variant of muay Thai and karate that he created in the 1950s. from Martial arts

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    • They are rather contemporary regional sports that coexist with the modern forms of martial arts sports as they have developed since the 19th century, often including cross-fertilization between sports and folk styles; thus, the traditional Thai art of muay boran developed into the modern national sport of muay Thai, which in turn came to be practiced worldwide and contributed significantly to modern hybrid styles like kickboxing and mixed martial arts. from Martial arts

    • Martial arts and combat sports that emphasize stand-up fighting include boxing, escrima, jōdō, karate, kendo, kickboxing, kung fu, muay thai, savate, fistfighting, silat and taekwondo. from Stand-up fighting

    • This type of kick is utilized in numerous full-contact martial arts such as karate, kickboxing, lethwei and muay Thai. from Low kick

    • The purpose of the event was to identify the most effective martial art in a real stand-up fight between competitors all over the world of different fighting disciplines, including boxing, kickboxing, mixed martial arts, judo, karate, Muay Thai, wrestling, and other styles. from SUPERKOMBAT Fighting Championship

    • Michalis "Mike" Zambidis ( Μιχάλης Ζαμπίδης; born July 15, 1980) is a professional Greek kickboxer and martial artist. from Mike Zambidis

    • Arlovski began taking a greater interest in other martial arts, studying kickboxing and developing his striking skills to complement his Sambo-based grappling abilities. from Andrei Arlovski

    • Andrei only took up martial arts at the age of 16 in Sambo and Kickboxing having previously been interested in football. from Andrei Arlovski

    • Guy Mezger (born January 1, 1968) is a retired American martial artist who competed in professional combat sports ranging from full contact karate, kickboxing, and boxing, but is most recognized as a mixed martial arts fighter (retired from competition January 25, 2005). from Guy Mezger

    • Full-contact martial arts include boxing, mixed martial arts, Brazilian jiu-jitsu, Muay Thai, judo, and various forms of full contact karate. Also, kickboxing, in the early 1970s in the United States, was born and introduced a controlled version of full contact to martial arts. from Contact sport

    • In 1992, after graduating from Rio Grande High School Jackson founded his own martial art, Gaidojutsu, which combines rudimentary techniques from wrestling and kickboxing with basic judo locks. from Greg Jackson (MMA trainer)

    • Peter "The Hurricane" Smit (December 24, 1961 – August 15, 2005) was a Dutch martial artist who mastered such different fight disciplines as kyokushin karate, kickboxing and Muay Thai. from Peter Smit

    • K-1 World MAX 2004 World Tournament Final was a kickboxing and martial arts event promoted by the K-1 organization. from K-1 World MAX 2004 World Tournament Final

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      Aikido Aikido (Japanese: 合気道, Hepburn: Aikidō) [a.i.ki.doː] is a Japanese martial art developed by Morihei Ueshiba as a…
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      Aikido (Japanese: 合気道, Hepburn: Aikidō) [a.i.ki.doː] is a Japanese martial art developed by Morihei Ueshiba as a synthesis of his martial studies, philosophy, and religious beliefs. Aikido is often translated as "the Way of unifying (with) life energy" or as "the Way of harmonious spirit." Ueshiba's goal was to create an art that practitioners could use to defend themselves while also protecting their attacker from injury.…

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      Aikido (Japanese: 合気道, Hepburn: Aikidō) [a.i.ki.doː] is a Japanese martial art developed by Morihei Ueshiba as a synthesis of his martial studies, philosophy, and religious beliefs. Aikido is often translated as "the Way of unifying (with) life energy" or as "the Way of harmonious spirit." Ueshiba's goal was to create an art that practitioners could use to defend themselves while also protecting their attacker from injury.
      Aikido is performed by blending with the motion of the attacker and redirecting the force of the attack rather than opposing it head-on. This requires very little physical strength, as the aikidōka (aikido practitioner) "leads" the attacker's momentum using entering and turning movements. The techniques are completed with various throws or joint locks.
      Aikido derives mainly from the martial art of Daitō-ryū Aiki-jūjutsu, but began to diverge from it in the late 1920s, partly due to Ueshiba's involvement with the Ōmoto-kyō religion. Ueshiba's early students' documents bear the term aiki-jūjutsu.
      Ueshiba's senior students have different approaches to aikido, depending partly on when they studied with him. Today aikido is found all over the world in a number of styles, with broad ranges of interpretation and emphasis. However, they all share techniques learned from Ueshiba and most have concern for the well-being of the attacker.

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    How Martial arts
    Connects To Aikido

    • In aikido, as in virtually all Japanese martial arts, there are both physical and mental aspects of training. from Aikido

    • For example, the Tokyo Riot Police's use of aikido. from Martial arts

    • Practitioners in some arts such as kickboxing and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu often train for sport matches, whereas those in other arts such as aikido and Wing Chun generally spurn such competitions. from Martial arts

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    • Aikido, for instance, can have a strong philosophical belief of the flow of energy and peace fostering, as idealised by its founder Morihei Ueshiba. from Martial arts

    • was a martial artist and founder of the Japanese martial art of aikido. from Morihei Ueshiba

    • Common martial arts featuring joint locks include Aikido, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Catch Wrestling, Eskrima, Eagle Claw, Fu Jow Pai, Hapkido, Hung Gar, Jujutsu, Judo, Ninjutsu, Shoot wrestling, and mixed martial arts. from Joint lock

    • Wristlocks are very common in martial arts such as Aikido, Hapkido and jujutsu where they are featured as self-defense techniques. from Wristlock

    • Hakama are also regularly worn by practitioners of a variety of martial arts, such as kendo, iaido, taido, aikido, ryu-te, and kyudo. from Hakama

    • Takuma Hisa (久 琢磨 Hisa Takuma, c.1895–1980-10-31) was a prominent Japanese martial artist, early student in Daito-ryu aiki-jujutsu of both Sokaku Takeda and aikido founder Morihei Ueshiba. from Takuma Hisa

    • The tambo is used in several martial arts including: jujutsu, aikido, kobudo, hapkido, yoseikan budo, Cuong Nhu. from Tambo (weapon)

    • is a Japanese teacher of the martial art of aikido. from Hiroshi Isoyama

    • Aiki-jō (Kanji: 合気杖 Hiragana: あいきじょう) is the name given specifically to the set of martial art techniques practiced with a (a wooden staff about four feet long), practiced according to the principles of aikido. from Aiki-jō

    • Cuong Nhu is a martial art that blends elements of Shotokan, Wing Chun, Judo, Aikido, T'ai chi ch'uan, Vovinam, and Boxing. from Cuong Nhu

    • Noriaki Inoue (1902-12-03, Tanabe – 1994-04-13, Kunitachi) was a Japanese martial artist, who was in his early years closely associated with the spiritual and technical development of aikido along with his uncle Morihei Ueshiba. from Noriaki Inoue

    • is a martial art in the tradition of budō, developed from the Japanese art aikido by Masamichi Noro and founded in Paris, France, in 1979. from Kinomichi

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      Brazilian jiu-jitsu Brazilian jiu-jitsu (/dʒuːˈdʒɪtsuː/; Portuguese: [ˈʒiw ˈʒitsu], [ˈʒu ˈʒitsu], [dʒiˈu dʒiˈtsu]) (BJJ; Portuguese…
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      Brazilian jiu-jitsu (/dʒuːˈdʒɪtsuː/; Portuguese: [ˈʒiw ˈʒitsu], [ˈʒu ˈʒitsu], [dʒiˈu dʒiˈtsu]) (BJJ; Portuguese: jiu-jitsu brasileiro) is a martial art, combat sport, and a self defense system that focuses on grappling and especially ground fighting. Brazilian jiu-jitsu was formed from Kodokan Judo ground fighting (newaza) fundamentals that were taught to Carlos Gracie and Luiz França by Mitsuyo…

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      Brazilian jiu-jitsu (/dʒuːˈdʒɪtsuː/; Portuguese: [ˈʒiw ˈʒitsu], [ˈʒu ˈʒitsu], [dʒiˈu dʒiˈtsu]) (BJJ; Portuguese: jiu-jitsu brasileiro) is a martial art, combat sport, and a self defense system that focuses on grappling and especially ground fighting. Brazilian jiu-jitsu was formed from Kodokan Judo ground fighting (newaza) fundamentals that were taught to Carlos Gracie and Luiz França by Mitsuyo Maeda and Soshihiro Satake [3]. Carlos Gracie is known as the Founder and Creator of Modern Jiu Jitsu (Gracie Jiu Jitsu/Brazilian Jiu Jitsu). Brazilian jiu-jitsu eventually came to be its own art through the experimentations, practices, and adaptation from the Judo knowledge of Carlos and Hélio Gracie, who then passed their knowledge on to their extended family.
      BJJ promotes the concept that a smaller, weaker person can successfully defend against a bigger, stronger assailant by using proper technique, leverage, and most notably, taking the fight to the ground, and then applying joint-locks and chokeholds to defeat the other person. BJJ training can be used for sport grappling tournaments (gi and no-gi) and mixed martial arts (MMA) competition or self-defense. Sparring (commonly referred to as "rolling") and live drilling play a major role in training, and a premium is placed on performance, especially in competition, in relation to progress and ascension through its ranking system.
      Since its inception in 1882, its parent art of Judo was separated from older systems of Japanese ju-jitsu by an important difference that was passed on to Brazilian jiu-jitsu: it is not solely a martial art, it is also a sport; a method for promoting physical fitness and building character in young people; and, ultimately, a way (Do) of life.

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    How Martial arts
    Connects To Brazilian jiu-jitsu

    • ;1990 to present During the 1990s Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu became popular and proved to be effective in mixed martial arts competitions such as the UFC and PRIDE. from Martial arts

    • Brazilian jiu-jitsu ( ; , , ) (BJJ; Portuguese: jiu-jitsu brasileiro) is a martial art, combat sport, and a self defense system that focuses on grappling and especially ground fighting. from Brazilian jiu-jitsu

    • The purpose of the early UFC competitions was to identify the most effective martial art in a real fight between competitors of different fighting disciplines, including Boxing, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Sambo, Wrestling, Muay Thai, Karate, Judo, and other styles. from Ultimate Fighting Championship

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    • Common martial arts featuring joint locks include Aikido, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Catch Wrestling, Eskrima, Eagle Claw, Fu Jow Pai, Hapkido, Hung Gar, Jujutsu, Judo, Ninjutsu, Shoot wrestling, and mixed martial arts. from Joint lock

    • His initial training and teaching of Jiu Jitsu was with his brothers, Luis Franca and Oswaldo Fadda popularised the martial art of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. from Carlos Gracie

    • Leglocks are featured, with various levels of restrictions, in combat sports and martial arts such as Sambo, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, catch wrestling, mixed martial arts, Shootwrestling and submission wrestling, but are banned in some sports featuring joint locks such as judo. from Leglock

    • Enrolling at the police academy in Minsk, Arlovski combined his interest in a career in law enforcement with his growing martial arts participation by taking up the required police defense course in Sambo and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and quickly showed himself to be a highly competent Sambo opponent. from Andrei Arlovski

    • Relson "Campeão" Gracie is a retired professional Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu fighter and martial arts personality. from Relson Gracie

    • The Gracie challenge was first issued by then Judoka Carlos Gracie in the 1920s to promote and develop the Gracie's style of Brazilian jiu-jitsu, and as an attempt to show that it was superior to other styles of martial arts. from Gracie Challenge

    • The Gracie challenge was an open invitation issued by some members of the Brazilian Gracie family, known for their Brazilian jiu-jitsu (BJJ) mastery, to martial artists of other styles to fight them in a vale tudo match. from Gracie Challenge

    • Browne was born in Oahu, Hawaii, and competed in basketball, winning the 2000 Coastal North League Player of the Year while attending high school in San Diego and then continued his career at Palomar College. Browne had no martial arts experience before being introduced to Brazilian jiu-jitsu at the age of 26. from Travis Browne

    • He began competing in martial arts when he was 19 years old, training in Brazilian jiu-jitsu and boxing. from Joey Villaseñor

    • Full-contact martial arts include boxing, mixed martial arts, Brazilian jiu-jitsu, Muay Thai, judo, and various forms of full contact karate. Also, kickboxing, in the early 1970s in the United States, was born and introduced a controlled version of full contact to martial arts. from Contact sport

    • Hansen's passion in martial arts began after seeing Jackie Chan films in his youth and he began training in Brazilian jiu-jitsu when he was 19 years old. from Joachim Hansen (fighter)

    • Humphrey began taking interest in martial arts from general grappling to Brazilian jiu-jitsu and Muay Thai. from Abongo Humphrey

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      Dan (rank) The dan (段) ranking system is used by many Japanese organizations to indicate the level of one's ability…
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      The dan (段) ranking system is used by many Japanese organizations to indicate the level of one's ability (expertise) within a certain subject matter. As a ranking system, it was originally used at a go school during the Edo period. It is now also used in modern fine arts and martial arts.…

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      The dan (段) ranking system is used by many Japanese organizations to indicate the level of one's ability (expertise) within a certain subject matter. As a ranking system, it was originally used at a go school during the Edo period. It is now also used in modern fine arts and martial arts.
      The system was applied to martial arts by Kanō Jigorō (1860–1938), the founder of judo, in 1883, and later introduced to other East Asia countries. In the modern Japanese martial arts, holders of dan ranks often wear a black belt; those of higher rank may also wear red-and-white and red belts. Dan ranks are still given for strategic board games such as go, Japanese chess (shogi), and renju as well as for cultural arts such as flower arrangement (ikebana), Japanese calligraphy (shodō) and tea ceremony (sadō). 
      The Chinese character for the word dan (段) literally means step or stage in Japanese, but is also used to refer to one's rank or grade, i.e., one's degree or level of expertise. In Chinese pinyin, however, the same character is spelled duàn, and was originally used to mean phase. Dan is often used together with the word kyū (級) in certain ranking systems, with dan being used for the higher ranks and kyū being used for lower ranks.

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    How Martial arts
    Connects To Dan (rank)

    • The rank system introduced for judo in the 1880s proved commercially viable, and colored-belt systems were adopted in many martial arts degree mills (also known as McDojos) as a means to generate additional cash. from Martial arts

    • In modern times, a dan-ranked practitioner of a style is usually recognized as a martial artist who has surpassed the kyū, or basic, ranks. from Dan (rank)

    • It is now also used in modern fine arts and martial arts. from Dan (rank)

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    • is a Japanese martial arts expert, holder of the 10th Dan. from Mabuni Kenei

    • An accomplished martial artist, he has dan ranks in karate (7th degree), judo (3rd degree), and aikido (2nd degree). from Yasuaki Kurata

    • Japan also has developed its own grading system widely used by the local climbers of the country, adopting the Dankyu (Dan and Kyu) system which resembles that of martial arts. from Grade (bouldering)

    • Roqueñi began practicing martial arts with karate at the age of 7, and now holds a 3rd dan black belt in the discipline. from Abraham Roqueñi

    • As a child she trained in martial arts, and has attained third dan in Hapkido and second dan in Taekwondo; she also practices muay thai and boxing. from Kim Ok-bin

    • Growing up, Octagón was mainly interested in Martial Arts and earned a black belt in Shotokan Karate. from Octagón

    • The Dankyu system which resembles that of martial arts (see Dan and Kyu), widely used in Japan. from Grade (climbing)

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    1. 12
      Kata Kata (型 or 形, literally: "form") is a Japanese word describing detailed choreographed patterns of movements…
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      Kata (型 or 形, literally: "form") is a Japanese word describing detailed choreographed patterns of movements practised either solo or in pairs. The term form is used for the corresponding concept in non-Japanese martial arts in general.…

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      Kata (型 or 形, literally: "form") is a Japanese word describing detailed choreographed patterns of movements practised either solo or in pairs. The term form is used for the corresponding concept in non-Japanese martial arts in general.
      Kata are used in many traditional Japanese arts such as theater forms like kabuki and schools of tea ceremony (chado), but are most commonly known for the presence in the martial arts. Kata are used by most Japanese and Okinawan martial arts, such as aikido, judo, kendo and karate.

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    How Martial arts
    Connects To Kata

    • Some martial artists compete in non-sparring competitions such as breaking or choreographed routines of techniques such as poomse, kata and aka, or modern variations of the martial arts which include dance-influenced competitions such as tricking. from Martial arts

    • The term form is used for the corresponding concept in non-Japanese martial arts in general. from Kata

    • Passai (拔塞/パッサイ also "Bassai / バッサイ") is the name of a group of kata practiced in different styles of martial arts, including karate and various Korean martial arts (Taekwondo, Tang Soo Do, Soo Bahk Do). from Passai

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    • It derived from martial arts forms (Kata, Taolu and more) such as Karate, Capoeira, Wushu, Tae Kwon Do, kalarippayattu incorporating techniques found in gymnastics, break dancing, and similar disciplines. from Tricking (martial arts)

    • The most familiar form of melee weapon and unarmed combat drill in the modern world is the Kata and the Hyung in Eastern martial arts. from Military parade

    • In sports, gymnastics, figure skating, and synchronized swimming are dance disciplines while martial arts "kata" are often compared to dances. from Performing arts

    • In sports, gymnastics, figure skating and synchronized swimming are dance disciplines while the Katas of the martial arts are often compared to dances. from Fine art

    • In sports, gymnastics, figure skating and synchronized swimming are dance disciplines while Martial arts 'kata' are often compared to dances. from The arts

    • In sports, gymnastics, figure skating and synchronized swimming are dance disciplines while Martial arts 'kata' are often compared to dances. from Humanities

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      Kendo Kendo (剣道, kendō), meaning "Way of The Sword", is a modern Japanese sport/martial art, which descended from…
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      Kendo (剣道, kendō), meaning "Way of The Sword", is a modern Japanese sport/martial art, which descended from swordsmanship (kenjutsu) and uses bamboo swords (shinai) and protective armour (bōgu). Today, it is widely practiced within Japan and many other nations across the world.…

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      Kendo (剣道, kendō), meaning "Way of The Sword", is a modern Japanese sport/martial art, which descended from swordsmanship (kenjutsu) and uses bamboo swords (shinai) and protective armour (bōgu). Today, it is widely practiced within Japan and many other nations across the world.
      Kendo is a physically and mentally challenging activity that combines martial arts practices and values with sport-like strenuous physical activity.

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    How Martial arts
    Connects To Kendo

    • It was formed on the principle of kendo not as a martial art but as educational sport, and it has continued to be practiced as such to this day. from Kendo

    • Kendo is a physically and mentally challenging activity that combines martial arts practices and values with sport-like strenuous physical activity. from Kendo

    • , meaning " of The ", is a modern Japanese sport/martial art, which descended from swordsmanship (kenjutsu) and uses bamboo swords (shinai) and protective armour (bōgu). from Kendo

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    • In Japan, the same period marks the formation of the modern forms of judo, jujutsu, karate, and kendo (among others) based on revivals of old schools of Edo period martial arts which had been suppressed during the Meiji Restoration. from Martial arts

    • Sometimes, training with one specific weapon will be considered a style of martial arts in its own right, which is especially the case in Japanese martial arts with disciplines such as kenjutsu and kendo (sword), bojutsu (staff), and kyudo (archery). from Martial arts

    • Hakama are also regularly worn by practitioners of a variety of martial arts, such as kendo, iaido, taido, aikido, ryu-te, and kyudo. from Hakama

    • Kumdo is a modern Korean martial art originating from Japanese Kendo. from Kumdo

    • Sho Kosugi (ショー・コスギ, born ; June 17, 1948) is a Japanese martial artist with extensive training in shindō jinen-ryū karate, kendo, judo, iaido, kobudo, aikido, and ninjutsu who gained popularity as an actor during the 1980s, usually playing a ninja. from Sho Kosugi

    • Martial arts and combat sports that emphasize stand-up fighting include boxing, escrima, jōdō, karate, kendo, kickboxing, kung fu, muay thai, savate, fistfighting, silat and taekwondo. from Stand-up fighting

    • In the Japanese schools at that time, the martial arts of kendo and judo were taught to students, and Saito chose to study kendo. from Morihiro Saito

    • Days earlier, an off-duty Koenig is in the gymnasium when an urgent summons to Main Mission interrupts his Kendo work-out with resident martial-arts enthusiast Luke Ferro. from The Testament of Arkadia

    • He is easily recognizable by his distinct batting stance in which he holds the bat high above his head, much like the jōdan no kamae seen in Kendo (a Japanese martial art). from Hiroyuki Nakajima

    • The school also has a demonstration team of two Asian martial arts: Taekwondo and Kendo. from South Island School

    • Personnel are trained in the martial arts, such as judo and kendo, and physical standards are strict. from Japan Self-Defense Forces

    • The name derives from the modern martial art of Japanese fencing (Kendo), and Nagasaki is the name of a city on the south-western coast of Kyūshū, site of the second use of the atomic bomb. from Kendo Nagasaki

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      Koryū Koryū (古流, old style) and kobudō (古武道, ancient martial arts) are Japanese terms that are used to describe Japanese…
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      Koryū (古流, old style) and kobudō (古武道, ancient martial arts) are Japanese terms that are used to describe Japanese martial arts that predate the Meiji restoration (1868). The term is contrasted with Gendai budo "modern martial arts" (or shinbudo "new martial arts") which refer to schools developed after the Meiji Restoration.

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    How Martial arts
    Connects To Koryū

    • In Japan, the same period marks the formation of the modern forms of judo, jujutsu, karate, and kendo (among others) based on revivals of old schools of Edo period martial arts which had been suppressed during the Meiji Restoration. from Martial arts

    • In English, the word is frequently used to refer to schools of Japanese martial art, although it can also be found used in other disciplines (for example Nihon-koryū and Sōgetsu-ryū in ikebana, Kantei-ryū in calligraphy, etc.). from Ryū (school)

    • This art of drawing the Japanese sword, katana, is one of the Japanese koryū martial art disciplines in the education of the classical warrior (bushi). from Iaijutsu

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    • is a Japanese koryū martial art whose foundation dates back to the early 16th century. from Kashima Shin-ryū

    • is a Japanese koryū sword-fighting martial art founded in the late Muromachi period by Katayama Hōki-no-kami Fujiwara Hisayasu (片山伯耆守藤原久安) (1575–1650). from Hōki-ryū

    • is a Japanese koryū martial art founded in the late Muromachi period by . from Asayama Ichiden-ryū

    • is a Japanese koryū martial art school founded by in 23 June 1680. from Mugai ryu

    • is a Japanese koryū martial art school founded by Fukui Hyōemon Yoshihira (福井兵右衛門嘉平) in the early 1700s. from Shindō Munen-ryū

    • Gosho Motoharu (五所 元治; 1919 – October 27, 2012) was a prominent master of the martial arts, koryu budō or kobudō. from Gosho Motoharu

    • is a Japanese koryu martial art founded in the late Muromachi period ca 1550 by Yamamoto Hisaya Masakatsu. from Kage-ryū

    • Araki Mataemon was the founder of the koryū martial art Yagyū Shingan-ryū, known sometimes as Yagyū Shingan-ryū Taijutsu. from Araki Mataemon

    • In the long feudal period governed by the samurai class, some methods that were used to train warriors were developed into well-ordered martial arts, in modern times referred to collectively as koryū. from Culture of Japan

    • According to s own sources, Iizasa Ienao founds Tenshin Shoden Katori Shinto-ryu, the earliest historically verifiable Japanese koryū martial art that is still extant today. from 1447

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      Wing Chun Wing Chun (Chinese: 詠春; pinyin: yǒng chūn; Cantonese Yale: wihng chēun; literally: "spring chant"), also romanised…
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      Wing Chun (Chinese: 詠春; pinyin: yǒng chūn; Cantonese Yale: wihng chēun; literally: "spring chant"), also romanised as Ving Tsun or Wing Tsun, (and sometimes substituted with the characters 永春 "eternal springtime"); is a concept-based Chinese martial art and form of self-defense utilising both striking and grappling while specialising close-range combat.…

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      Wing Chun (Chinese: 詠春; pinyin: yǒng chūn; Cantonese Yale: wihng chēun; literally: "spring chant"), also romanised as Ving Tsun or Wing Tsun, (and sometimes substituted with the characters 永春 "eternal springtime"); is a concept-based Chinese martial art and form of self-defense utilising both striking and grappling while specialising close-range combat.
      The alternative characters 永春 "eternal spring" are also associated with some other southern Chinese martial arts, including Weng Chun Kung Fu and Yong Chun .

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    How Martial arts
    Connects To Wing Chun

    • Practitioners in some arts such as kickboxing and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu often train for sport matches, whereas those in other arts such as aikido and Wing Chun generally spurn such competitions. from Martial arts

    • Jeet Kune Do, the system he founded, has its roots in Wing Chun, western boxing, savate and fencing. from Martial arts

    • The different branches of the Chinese martial art Wing Chun can be thought of as describing both the differing traditions and interpretations of Wing Chun, and the teacher-student relationships which perpetuate them. from Branches of Wing Chun

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    • Yip Man (1893–1972), Wing Chun martial art master, sifu of Bruce Lee. from Foshan

    • Cuong Nhu is a martial art that blends elements of Shotokan, Wing Chun, Judo, Aikido, T'ai chi ch'uan, Vovinam, and Boxing. from Cuong Nhu

    • Yen and Yip's latest collaboration as actor and director, Ip Man, is a semi-biographical account of Yip Man, the first martial arts master (Chinese: Sifu) to teach the Chinese martial art of Wing Chun openly. from Wilson Yip

    • He is an accomplished martial artist and has received black belts in Goju Ryu Karate,Jeet Kune Do,Wing Chun,Hapkido, Jujutsu, and Tae Kwon Do. from Taimak

    • At the age of ten, Tom began practicing various martial arts such as hung ga, karate and wing chun, and later took up acrobatics. from Tom Wu

    • Throughout all four films, Riggs has used martial arts, including Kali, Shotokan Karate, Tae Kwon Do, Wing Chun, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Judo, Capoeira, Boxing, and Muay Thai (leading Murtaugh to jokingly suggest that Riggs himself be registered as a "lethal weapon", hence the title of the first film) and a Beretta 92F (assume FS) pistol as his signature weapon, though he will often commandeer an H&K MP5 sub-machine gun or AK-47 assault rifle from a vanquished foe if more firepower is needed, and also briefly used a Heckler & Koch PSG1 sniper rifle in the first film, for ranges exceeded by accurate 9x19mm (Luger) firepower. from Martin Riggs

    • Yongchun martial arts The city hosted the Sixth National Peasants' Games in 2008. from Quanzhou

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      Eskrima Eskrima, Arnis, and Kali are umbrella terms for the traditional martial arts of the Philippines ("Filipino Martial…
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      Eskrima, Arnis, and Kali are umbrella terms for the traditional martial arts of the Philippines ("Filipino Martial Arts," or FMA) that emphasize weapon-based fighting with sticks, knives and other bladed weapons, and various improvised weapons. It is also known as Estoque (Spanish for rapier), Estocada (Spanish for thrust or stab) and Garrote (Spanish for club).…

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      Eskrima, Arnis, and Kali are umbrella terms for the traditional martial arts of the Philippines ("Filipino Martial Arts," or FMA) that emphasize weapon-based fighting with sticks, knives and other bladed weapons, and various improvised weapons. It is also known as Estoque (Spanish for rapier), Estocada (Spanish for thrust or stab) and Garrote (Spanish for club). In Luzon they may go by the name of Arnis de Mano, Pananandata (use of weapons), Sinawali (Pampanga, "to weave"), Sitbatan (Pangasinan), Didya and Kabaroan (Ilocos region). In the Visayas and Mindanao, these martial arts have been referred to as Eskrima, Kali, Kaliradman, Pagaradman and Kalirongan. Kuntaw and Silat are separate martial arts that have been practiced in the islands.
      It also includes hand-to-hand combat, joint locks, grappling and weapon disarming techniques. Although in general, emphasis is put on weapons for these arts, some systems put empty hands as the primary focus and some old school systems do not teach weapons at all. For the purpose of convenience, this article will use the term Eskrima throughout.

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    How Martial arts
    Connects To Eskrima

    • and continue to influence today's systems along with other traditional systems such as eskrima and silat. from Martial arts

    • Such traditions include eskrima, silat, kalaripayat, kobudo, and historical European martial arts, especially those of the German Renaissance. from Martial arts

    • Eskrima, Arnis, and Kali are umbrella terms for the traditional martial arts of the Philippines ("Filipino Martial Arts," or FMA) that emphasize weapon-based fighting with sticks, knives and other bladed weapons, and various improvised weapons. from Eskrima

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    • Common martial arts featuring joint locks include Aikido, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Catch Wrestling, Eskrima, Eagle Claw, Fu Jow Pai, Hapkido, Hung Gar, Jujutsu, Judo, Ninjutsu, Shoot wrestling, and mixed martial arts. from Joint lock

    • The martial art Eskrima was a tradition in his family, and he began training at age seven under his brother Filemon "Momoy" Cañete. from Ciriaco Cañete

    • Many martial arts employ the use of common objects as weapons; Okinawan karate features items of farming equipment that were later used as weapons by Okinawan peasants due the prohibition of weapons imposed by the shogun regime during feudal times; Filipino martial arts such as Eskrima include practice with machetes, canes, bamboo spears, and knives as a result of the 400 year Spanish colonization that took place in the Philippines which prohibited the ownership and use of standard swords and bladed weapons; Chinese martial arts and some Korean martial arts commonly feature the use of improvised weapons such as fans, hammers and . from Improvised weapon

    • Kamagong is also popular for martial arts training implements such as bokkens and eskrima sticks. from Diospyros blancoi

    • Martial arts and combat sports that emphasize stand-up fighting include boxing, escrima, jōdō, karate, kendo, kickboxing, kung fu, muay thai, savate, fistfighting, silat and taekwondo. from Stand-up fighting

    • Due to its durability and resistance to splintering, sections of rattan can be used as staves or canes for martial arts— 70 cm-long rattan sticks, called baston, are used in Filipino martial arts, especially Modern Arnis and Eskrima and for the striking weapons in the Society for Creative Anachronism's full-contact "heavy combat". from Rattan

    • She trains under the tutelage of Richard Dragon, one of DC's premiere martial artists, to engage in combat (using eskrima) from her wheelchair. from Barbara Gordon

    • Popular activities at the park include jogging, aerobics, school dance rehearsals, promenading, Arnis and martial arts practice and feeding the tilapias of the lagoon. from Capitol Park and Lagoon

    • All of the cast went under three months of training martial arts, capoeira, muay thai, judo, kali, arnis and wushu. from Rounin (TV series)

    • There are several forms of Filipino martial arts that originated in the Philippines (similar to how Silat is the martial arts practiced in Asia) including Eskrima (weapon-based fighting, also known as Arnis and in the West sometimes as Kali), Panantukan (empty-handed techniques), and Pananjakman (the boxing component of Filipino martial arts). from Culture of the Philippines

    • In addition, she is skilled in military strategy, martial arts, and Pegasus-galaxy diplomacy, and displays knowledge of and proficiency with Earth technology; she practices a form of stick-fighting (based on Eskrima) with John Sheppard and has taken up use of Earth weapons (such as a P-90) with great facility. from Teyla Emmagan

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      Shaolin Kung Fu Shaolin Kung Fu (Chinese: 少林功夫; pinyin: shao lin gong fu), also called Shaolin Wushu (少林武术; shao lin wu shu) or…
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      Shaolin Kung Fu (Chinese: 少林功夫; pinyin: shao lin gong fu), also called Shaolin Wushu (少林武术; shao lin wu shu) or simply Shaolin quan (少林拳), is believed to be the oldest institutionalized style of kung fu and is one of the most famous martial arts. Shaolin kung fu originated and was developed in the Buddhist Shaolin…

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      Shaolin Kung Fu (Chinese: 少林功夫; pinyin: shao lin gong fu), also called Shaolin Wushu (少林武术; shao lin wu shu) or simply Shaolin quan (少林拳), is believed to be the oldest institutionalized style of kung fu and is one of the most famous martial arts. Shaolin kung fu originated and was developed in the Buddhist Shaolin temple in Songshan mountain, Henan province, China. During the 1500 years of the development of Shaolin kung fu, it became one of the biggest schools of kung fu, and besides, numerous other styles were created or inspired on the base of Shaolin kung fu. One Chinese saying is: "All martial arts under heaven arose out of Shaolin." Shaolin kung fu has various barehanded and weapon styles, every style with a few routines for health, and fighting.
      Besides the core style of Shaolin temple, the name Shaolin is used as a brand for the so-called external styles of kung fu. There are many such styles outside of Shaolin temple, mainly in southern and northern China, that use the name Shaolin.

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    How Martial arts
    Connects To Shaolin Kung Fu

    • Legendary accounts link the origin of Shaolinquan to the spread of Buddhism from India during the early 5th century AD, with the figure of Bodhidharma, to China. from Martial arts

    • Martial arts traditions in Japan and Korea, and Southeast Asia cite Chinese influence as transmitted by Buddhist monks. from Shaolin Kung Fu

    • Shaolin Kung Fu ( ), also called Shaolin Wushu ( ) or simply Shaolin quan ( ), is one of the oldest and most famous martial arts . from Shaolin Kung Fu

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    • Luohan style is the oldest and the representative style of Shaolin Kung Fu, so that the name Luohan quan is considered an equal name for the whole vast system of Shaolin Temple martial arts. from Luohan (martial arts)

    • A legendary culture hero, Zhang Sanfeng is credited by modern practitioners as having originated the concepts of neijia (內家); soft, internal martial arts, specifically T'ai chi ch'uan, as a result of a Neo-Confucian syncretism of Chán Buddhist Shaolin martial arts with his mastery of Taoist Tao Yin (neigong) principles. from Zhang Sanfeng

    • The San Te or San-De (Chinese 三德) monk was a legendary Shaolin martial arts disciple who trained under the general Zhi Shan. from San Te

    • He had studied a number of martial arts including, Shaolinquan, Three Emperors Pao Chui, Baguazhang and Tongbeiquan. from Ma Yueliang

    • His training of martial arts has made him a disciplined and efficient fighter specializing in Shaolin kung fu. from Adam Park

    • He began martial arts training at the age of 6 when he took up Shotokan Karate, and then Shaolin Kung Fu at 16. from Yasubey Enomoto

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      Capoeira Capoeira (/ˌkæpuːˈɛərə/; Portuguese pronunciation: [kapuˈejɾɐ]) is a Brazilian martial art that combines elements…
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      Capoeira (/ˌkæpuːˈɛərə/; Portuguese pronunciation: [kapuˈejɾɐ]) is a Brazilian martial art that combines elements of dance, acrobatics and music, and is sometimes referred to as a game. It was developed in Brazil mainly by African descendants (N'golo, or zebra dance - a kind of dance in which the participant uses the feet to kick the head…

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      Capoeira (/ˌkæpuːˈɛərə/; Portuguese pronunciation: [kapuˈejɾɐ]) is a Brazilian martial art that combines elements of dance, acrobatics and music, and is sometimes referred to as a game. It was developed in Brazil mainly by African descendants (N'golo, or zebra dance - a kind of dance in which the participant uses the feet to kick the head of their opponent, with movements reminiscent of a zebra, hence the name) with native Brazilian influences (Maraná war fight - a kind of fight in which one uses all of the body to attack the enemy), probably beginning in the 16th century. It is known for quick and complex moves, using mainly power, speed, and leverage for a wide variety of kicks, spins, and highly mobile techniques; at heart is the ginga (similar to native Brazilian dance still seen today), the back-and-forth, foot-to-foot movement that serves as the starting point for such leverage. Capoeira used in genuine self-defense situations incorporates many sweeps and low moves, whereas when played as a game there is more emphasis on high moves, demonstrations of acrobatics, full cartwheels (called au) for evasion, and flips or other exotic techniques by mestres (masters), and performing an entertaining match for the audience. Quoted by Edward, "It's actually really beautiful to watch".
      As with its early history, the origins of the word capoeira remains controversial. There is evidence to suggest that the word originates in Angola, where the word "kapwera" is the Bantu verb meaning "to fight". The word capoeira may have come from the Tupi words ka'a ("jungle") e pûer ("it was"), referring to the areas of low vegetation in the Brazilian interior where the game was played. It was practiced by slaves and disguised as a dance in order to prevent its capoeiristas from punishment or execution for learning how to fight and defend themselves, which was forbidden to those who were legally defined as property. It is nearly always practiced to traditional Brazilian berimbau music.

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    How Martial arts
    Connects To Capoeira

    • Capoeira is a fast and versatile martial art which is historically focused on fighting outnumbered or in technological disadvantage. from Capoeira

    • Capoeira ( ; ) is a Brazilian martial art that combines elements of dance, acrobatics and music, and is sometimes referred to as a game. from Capoeira

    • Manoel dos Reis Machado, commonly called Mestre Bimba ( ; November 23, 1899 – February 5, 1974), was a mestre (a master practitioner) of the Afro-Brazilian martial art of "capoeira". from Manuel dos Reis Machado

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    • Vicente Joaquim Ferreira Pastinha (commonly called Mestre Pastinha) (April 5, 1889, Salvador, Bahia, Brazil – November 13, 1981) was a mestre (a master practitioner) of the Afro-Brazilian martial art Capoeira. from Vicente Ferreira Pastinha

    • João Oliveira dos Santos (born 15 January 1933) better known as Mestre João Grande, is a Grão-Mestre (Great Master) of the Afro-Brazilian martial art of capoeira angola who has contributed to the spread of this art throughout the world. from João Grande

    • A butterfly kick or horse kick (xuànzi 旋子 circle) is a jumping kick in martial arts such as modern wushu and taekwondo and capoeira. from Butterfly kick

    • Mestre Amen Santo is an Afro-Brazilian mestre (master) of the acrobatic martial art of capoeira. from Amen Santo

    • It is considered to be the only Hollywood film that showcases Capoeira, an Afro-Brazilian martial art, from beginning to end. from Only the Strong (film)

    • It derived from martial arts forms (Kata, Taolu and more) such as Karate, Capoeira, Wushu, Tae Kwon Do, kalarippayattu incorporating techniques found in gymnastics, break dancing, and similar disciplines. from Tricking (martial arts)

    • Aerial cartwheels are performed in gymnastics, cheerleading, acro dance, free running and in martial arts such as Wushu and Capoeira. from Aerial cartwheel

    • The move is commonly employed in the Afro-Brazilian martial art Capoeira and in breakdancing. from Headspin

    • The martial art of capoeira has a similar move called the aú. from Cartwheel (gymnastics)

    • In martial arts, Brazilians have developed capoeira, vale tudo, and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. from Culture of Brazil

    • Capoeira is an Afro-Brazilian martial art that combines elements of dance and music, and is marked by deft, tricky movements that are often played on the ground or completely inverted. from Sport in Brazil

    • Throughout all four films, Riggs has used martial arts, including Kali, Shotokan Karate, Tae Kwon Do, Wing Chun, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Judo, Capoeira, Boxing, and Muay Thai (leading Murtaugh to jokingly suggest that Riggs himself be registered as a "lethal weapon", hence the title of the first film) and a Beretta 92F (assume FS) pistol as his signature weapon, though he will often commandeer an H&K MP5 sub-machine gun or AK-47 assault rifle from a vanquished foe if more firepower is needed, and also briefly used a Heckler & Koch PSG1 sniper rifle in the first film, for ranges exceeded by accurate 9x19mm (Luger) firepower. from Martin Riggs

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      Hapkido Hapkido (also spelled hap ki do or hapki-do; Hangul: 합기도; Hanja: 合氣道) is a dynamic and highly eclectic Korean…
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      Hapkido (also spelled hap ki do or hapki-do; Hangul: 합기도; Hanja: 合氣道) is a dynamic and highly eclectic Korean martial art. It is a form of self-defense that employs joint locks, grappling and throwing techniques of other martial arts, as well as kicks, punches, and other striking attacks. There is also the use of traditional…

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      Hapkido (also spelled hap ki do or hapki-do; Hangul: 합기도; Hanja: 合氣道) is a dynamic and highly eclectic Korean martial art. It is a form of self-defense that employs joint locks, grappling and throwing techniques of other martial arts, as well as kicks, punches, and other striking attacks. There is also the use of traditional weapons, including knife, sword, rope, jool bong (nunchaku), cane, short stick (dan bong), and middle-length staff (joong bong, gun, bō (Japanese)) which vary in emphasis depending on the particular tradition examined.
      Hapkido contains both long- and close-range fighting techniques, utilizing jumping kicks and percussive hand strikes at longer ranges and pressure point strikes, joint locks, or throws at closer fighting distances. Hapkido emphasizes circular motion, redirection of force, and control of the opponent. Practitioners seek to gain advantage through footwork and body positioning to incorporate the use of leverage, avoiding the use of strength against strength.
      The art adapted from Daitō-ryū Aiki-jūjutsu (大東流合気柔術) as it was taught by Choi Yong-Sool (Hangul: 최용술) when he returned to Korea after World War II, having lived in Japan for 30 years. This system was later combined with kicking and striking techniques of indigenous and contemporary arts such as taekkyeon, as well as throwing techniques and ground fighting from Japanese judo. Its history is obscured by the historical animosity between the Korean and Japanese people following the Second World War.

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    How Martial arts
    Connects To Hapkido

    • Common martial arts featuring joint locks include Aikido, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Catch Wrestling, Eskrima, Eagle Claw, Fu Jow Pai, Hapkido, Hung Gar, Jujutsu, Judo, Ninjutsu, Shoot wrestling, and mixed martial arts. from Joint lock

    • Choi Yong-sool ( ; November 9, 1904 – June 15, 1986), alternative spelling Choi Yong-sul, was the founder of the martial art hapkido. from Choi Yong-sool

    • Myung Jae Nam or Jae-Nam Myong (1938-August 3, 1999) was a Korean Hapkido practitioner who founded two martial art styles; Hankido and Hankumdo. from Myung Jae-nam

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    • Wristlocks are very common in martial arts such as Aikido, Hapkido and jujutsu where they are featured as self-defense techniques. from Wristlock

    • Its main influences include the martial arts of Hapkido, Hakko-ryu Jujutsu, Judo and Kyuk Too Ki (Korean style ThaiBoxing/Shootboxing). from GongKwon Yusul

    • The tambo is used in several martial arts including: jujutsu, aikido, kobudo, hapkido, yoseikan budo, Cuong Nhu. from Tambo (weapon)

    • He is an accomplished martial artist and has received black belts in Goju Ryu Karate,Jeet Kune Do,Wing Chun,Hapkido, Jujutsu, and Tae Kwon Do. from Taimak

    • It was at this stage of his life that Lee began studying also the Korean martial art of hapkido under Hwang In-Shik, who appeared with Bruce Lee in Way of the Dragon. from Dragon Lee

    • Before joining the police force, he was an accomplished martial artist; he was the South East Asian wrestling champion twice, a 7th degree Black Belt in Taekwondo, 8th in Hapkido, 9th in Karate and 10th in Judo. from Chan Ka-kui

    • He is also a martial artist having studied hapkido, taekwondo, Karate. from Mat Fraser

    • August A. Busch IV holds advanced black belt degrees in the martial arts disciplines of Judo, Tae-Kwon-Do and Hapkido. from August Busch IV

    • As a child she trained in martial arts, and has attained third dan in Hapkido and second dan in Taekwondo; she also practices muay thai and boxing. from Kim Ok-bin

    • Montgomery is a keen martial arts student, and a practitioner of Hapkido. from Anthony Montgomery

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      Jeet Kune Do Jeet Kune Do, also Jeet Kun Do, and abbreviated JKD, is an eclectic and hybrid martial art system and philosophy of…
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      Jeet Kune Do, also Jeet Kun Do, and abbreviated JKD, is an eclectic and hybrid martial art system and philosophy of life founded by the martial artist Bruce Lee (1940–1973) in 1967 with simple and direct, or straightforward, movements and non-classical style. Jeet Kune Do practitioners believe in minimal movements with maximum effects and extreme…

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      Jeet Kune Do, also Jeet Kun Do, and abbreviated JKD, is an eclectic and hybrid martial art system and philosophy of life founded by the martial artist Bruce Lee (1940–1973) in 1967 with simple and direct, or straightforward, movements and non-classical style. Jeet Kune Do practitioners believe in minimal movements with maximum effects and extreme speed. The system works by using different "tools" for different situations, where the situations are divided into ranges, which is kicking, punching, trapping, and grappling, where martial artists use techniques to flow smoothly between them. It is referred to as "a style without style" or "the art of fighting without fighting" as said by Lee himself. Unlike more traditional martial arts, Jeet Kune Do is not fixed or patterned, and is a philosophy with guiding thoughts. It was named for the Wing Chun concept of interception or attacking while one's opponent is about to attack. However, the name Jeet Kune Do was often said by Lee to be just a name. He himself often referred it as "the art of expressing the human body" in his writings and in interviews. Through his studies Lee came to believe that styles had become too rigid and unrealistic. He called martial art competitions of the day "dry land swimming". He believed that combat was spontaneous, and that a martial artist cannot predict it, only react to it, and that a good martial artist should "be like water" and move fluidly without hesitation.
      In 2004, the Bruce Lee Foundation decided to use the name Jun Fan Jeet Kune Do (振藩截拳道) to refer to the martial arts system that Lee founded; "Jun Fan" was Lee's Chinese given name.

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    How Martial arts
    Connects To Jeet Kune Do

    • Jeet Kune Do, the system he founded, has its roots in Wing Chun, western boxing, savate and fencing. from Martial arts

    • Unlike more traditional martial arts, Jeet Kune Do is not fixed or patterned, and is a philosophy with guiding thoughts. from Jeet Kune Do

    • The system works by using different "tools" for different situations, where the situations are divided into ranges, which is kicking, punching, trapping, and grappling, where martial artists use techniques to flow smoothly between them. from Jeet Kune Do

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    • Jeet Kune Do, also Jeet Kun Do, and abbreviated JKD, is an eclectic and hybrid martial art system and philosophy of life founded by the martial artist Bruce Lee (1940–1973) in 1967 with simple and direct, or straightforward, movements and non-classical style. from Jeet Kune Do

    • Bruce Lee ( ; born Lee Jun-fan, ; November 27, 1940 – July 20, 1973) was a Hong Kong American martial artist, Hong Kong action film actor, martial arts instructor, filmmaker, and the founder of Jeet Kune Do. from Bruce Lee

    • Bruce Lee's Fighting Method is a book of volumes covering Bruce Lee's martial arts abilities of the Jeet Kune Do movement. from Bruce Lee's Fighting Method

    • From 1967 to 1968, he studied privately with the influential martial artist and Jeet Kune Do founder Bruce Lee. from Joe Lewis (martial artist)

    • Lee has trained in Bruce Lee's martial art Jeet Kune Do since portraying Lee and continues to train and is now a certified instructor under former Bruce Lee student Jerry Poteet. from Jason Scott Lee

    • He was also a cousin of Carter Hargrave, an American Jeet Kune Do martial artist. from Rudolph Hargrave

    • He is an accomplished martial artist and has received black belts in Goju Ryu Karate,Jeet Kune Do,Wing Chun,Hapkido, Jujutsu, and Tae Kwon Do. from Taimak

    • The inspiration for Spike's martial arts is found in Bruce Lee, who uses the style of Jeet Kune Do as depicted in Session 8, "Waltz For Venus". from List of Cowboy Bebop characters

    • He is an avid martial artist and a student of the Degerberg Blend, a Jeet Kune Do concept that mixes approximately twenty-five different fighting arts from around the world. from Matthew Stover

    • He was introduced to martial arts when he began practicing Shotokan karate and Jeet Kun Do at a young age in his school's cafeteria. from Spencer Fisher

    • His brother, Kwoklyn, is an accomplished martial artist who teaches Jeet Kune Do in Leicester. from Gok Wan

    • In January 1992, Danzig became a student of Jerry Poteet, a world-renowned martial artist in Jeet Kune Do. from Glenn Danzig

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      Grappling Grappling refers to techniques, maneuvers, and counters applied to an opponent in order to gain a physical…
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      Grappling refers to techniques, maneuvers, and counters applied to an opponent in order to gain a physical advantage, such as improving relative position, escaping, submitting, or injury to the opponent. Grappling is a general term that covers techniques used in many disciplines, styles and martial arts that are practiced both as combat sports and for…

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      Grappling refers to techniques, maneuvers, and counters applied to an opponent in order to gain a physical advantage, such as improving relative position, escaping, submitting, or injury to the opponent. Grappling is a general term that covers techniques used in many disciplines, styles and martial arts that are practiced both as combat sports and for self defense. Grappling does not include striking or most commonly the use of weapons. However, some fighting styles or martial arts known especially for their grappling techniques teach tactics that include strikes and weapons either alongside grappling or combined with it.

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    Connects To Grappling

    • A large part of most martial arts and combat sports which feature ground grappling is positioning and obtaining a dominant position. from Grappling

    • Grappling is a general term that covers techniques used in many disciplines, styles and martial arts that are practiced both as combat sports and for self defense. from Grappling

    • ;Unarmed Unarmed martial arts can be broadly grouped into focusing on strikes, those focusing on grappling and those that cover both fields, often described as hybrid martial arts. from Martial arts

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    • Joint locks are commonly featured in all forms of grappling, whether it be in martial arts, self-defense, combat sport or hand to hand combat application. from Joint lock

    • Brazilian jiu-jitsu ( ; , , ) (BJJ; Portuguese: jiu-jitsu brasileiro) is a martial art, combat sport, and a self defense system that focuses on grappling and especially ground fighting. from Brazilian jiu-jitsu

    • A throw is a martial arts term for a grappling technique that involves off-balancing or lifting an opponent, and throwing them to the ground, in Japanese martial arts referred to as nage-waza, 投げ技, "throwing technique". from Throw (grappling)

    • A grappling hold (commonly referred to simply as a hold; in Japanese referred to as katame-waza, , "grappling technique") is a grappling, wrestling, judo or other martial arts term for a specific grip that is applied to an opponent. from Grappling hold

    • Submission wrestling (also known as submission fighting, submission grappling, sport grappling, or simply as No-Gi) or Combat wrestling (in Japan), is a formula of competition and a general term for martial arts and combat sports that focus on clinch and ground fighting with the aim of obtaining a submission using submission holds. from Submission wrestling

    • Mixed martial arts (MMA) is a full-contact combat sport that allows the use of both striking and grappling techniques, both standing and on the ground, from a variety of other combat sports and martial arts. from Mixed martial arts

    • Hooks is a term in grappling martial arts that generally refers to the use of careful positioning of a practitioner’s feet and legs to control and manipulate the movement or position of their opponent. from Hooks (grappling)

    • More formal systems have been codified in various forms of martial arts worldwide, where grappling techniques form a significant subset of unarmed fighting (complemented by striking techniques). from History of wrestling

    • Humphrey began taking interest in martial arts from general grappling to Brazilian jiu-jitsu and Muay Thai. from Abongo Humphrey

    • Although Enshin is a "stand-up fighting" style that includes kicks, strikes, and punches found in most other styles of karate, it also utilizes numerous grabs, sweeps, and throws often associated with Judo or other grappling styles of martial arts. from Enshin kaikan

    • Leglock in wrestling, grappling, and martial arts; a practitioner wrapping their a legs around a limb or limbs of their opponent to gain control or leverage. from Grapevine (disambiguation)

    • He found martial arts after going to a Job Corps to get his high school diploma where he learned grappling from a freestyle grappler. from John Howard (fighter)

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      Combat sport A combat sport, or fighting sport, is a competitive contact sport with one-on-one combat. Determining the winner…
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      A combat sport, or fighting sport, is a competitive contact sport with one-on-one combat. Determining the winner depends on the particular contest's rules. In many fighting sports, a contestant wins by scoring more points than the opponent or by disabling the opponent. Boxing, kickboxing, amateur wrestling, judo, Brazilian Jujitsu, mixed martial arts, and Muay Thai are examples of combat sports.

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    How Martial arts
    Connects To Combat sport

    • This was the origin of the first Ultimate Fighting Championship tournament (later renamed ) in the U.S. inspired by the Brazilian Vale tudo tradition and along with other minimal rule competitions, most notably those from Japan such as Shooto and Pancrase, have evolved into the combat sport of Mixed Martial Arts (MMA). from Martial arts

    • By application or intent: self-defense, combat sport, choreography or demonstration of forms, physical fitness, meditation, etc. from Martial arts

    • Martial arts are codified systems and traditions of combat practices, which are practiced for a variety of reasons: self-defense, competition, physical health and fitness, entertainment, as well as mental, physical, and spiritual development. from Martial arts

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    • There are also other variations employed in martial arts and combat sports. from Strike (attack)

    • A large part of most martial arts and combat sports which feature ground grappling is positioning and obtaining a dominant position. from Grappling

    • Grappling is a general term that covers techniques used in many disciplines, styles and martial arts that are practiced both as combat sports and for self defense. from Grappling

    • Joint locks are commonly featured in all forms of grappling, whether it be in martial arts, self-defense, combat sport or hand to hand combat application. from Joint lock

    • It is used in some martial arts and combat sports, most notably boxing where it is the only type of offensive technique allowed. from Punch (combat)

    • Brazilian jiu-jitsu ( ; , , ) (BJJ; Portuguese: jiu-jitsu brasileiro) is a martial art, combat sport, and a self defense system that focuses on grappling and especially ground fighting. from Brazilian jiu-jitsu

    • Sambo ( ; ) is a Russian martial art and combat sport. from Sambo (martial art)

    • In martial arts and combat sports, a takedown is a technique that involves off-balancing an opponent and bringing him or her to the ground, typically with the combatant performing the takedown landing on top. from Takedown (grappling)

    • Chokeholds are used in martial arts, combat sports, self-defense, law enforcement and in military hand to hand combat applications. from Chokehold

    • Submission wrestling (also known as submission fighting, submission grappling, sport grappling, or simply as No-Gi) or Combat wrestling (in Japan), is a formula of competition and a general term for martial arts and combat sports that focus on clinch and ground fighting with the aim of obtaining a submission using submission holds. from Submission wrestling

    • The term is commonly used in mixed martial arts and other combat sports, as well as various forms of martial arts to designate the set of techniques employed by a combatant that is on the ground, as opposed to techniques employed in stand-up fighting. from Ground fighting

    • The term is commonly used in martial arts and combat sports to designate the set of techniques employed from a standing position, as opposed to techniques employed in ground fighting. from Stand-up fighting

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      Kick A kick is a physical strike using the foot, leg, or knee (the latter is also known as a knee strike). This type of…
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      A kick is a physical strike using the foot, leg, or knee (the latter is also known as a knee strike). This type of attack is used frequently by hooved animals as well as humans in the context of stand-up fighting. Kicks play a significant role in many forms of martial arts, such as Taekwondo, Sikaran, Karate, Pankration, Kung fu, Vovinam, Kickboxing, Muay Thai, Capoeira, Silat, and Kalarippayattu.

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    How Martial arts
    Connects To Kick

    • Savate ( ), also known as boxe française, French boxing, French kickboxing or French footfighting, is a traditional French martial art which uses the hands and feet as weapons combining elements of western boxing with graceful kicking techniques. from Savate

    • Although Catch Wrestling did not normally include kicks and blows, it is credited as one of the three disciplines involved in the series of 20th century cross-cultural clash of styles in martial arts. from Catch wrestling

    • A flying kick is a type of kick in certain martial arts and in martial-arts based gymnastics, with the particularity that the kick is delivered while in the air, specifically moving ("flying") into the opponent after a running start to gain forward momentum. from Flying kick

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    • Its style may vary from light flick to a kick in martial arts. from Glossary of dance moves

    • A scissor kick in martial arts is used to describe certain kicking or grabbing techniques that resemble a pair of scissors. from Scissor kick (martial arts)

    • Many stunt performers and martial artists are capable of performing a similar skill on the ground, sometimes in combination with a midair inverted kick. from Gainer

    • :Daniel Ilabaca and Ryan Doyle were among the freerunners appearing in a commercial shown regularly on Sky Sports to promote the Champions' League, in which they performed various tricks and martial arts kicks on a computer-generated football around central London's South Bank. from Daniel Ilabaca

    • From a technical point of view, Nippon Kempo is a martial art system based on techniques of striking and kicking, (atemi-waza), blocking (uke-waza), throwing (nage-waza), reverse joint locks (kansetsu-gyakutori-waza) and ground combat (ne-waza). from Nippon Kempo

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    1. 24
      Mixed martial arts Mixed martial arts (MMA) is a full-contact combat sport that allows the use of both striking and grappling…
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      Mixed martial arts (MMA) is a full-contact combat sport that allows the use of both striking and grappling techniques, both standing and on the ground, from a variety of other combat sports and martial arts. Various mixed-style contests took place throughout Europe, Japan and the Pacific Rim during the early 1900s. In 1980 CV Productions,…

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      Mixed martial arts (MMA) is a full-contact combat sport that allows the use of both striking and grappling techniques, both standing and on the ground, from a variety of other combat sports and martial arts. Various mixed-style contests took place throughout Europe, Japan and the Pacific Rim during the early 1900s. In 1980 CV Productions, Inc. created the first regulated MMA league in the United States named Super Fighters, sanctioning ten tournaments in Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania State Senate passed a bill in 1983 which prohibited the sport. The combat sport of vale tudo that had developed in Brazil from the 1920s was brought to the United States by the Gracie family in 1993 with the founding of the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC).
      The more dangerous vale-tudo-style bouts of the early UFCs were made safer with the implementation of additional rules, leading to the popular regulated form of MMA seen today. Originally promoted as a competition with the intention of finding the most effective martial arts for real unarmed combat situations, competitors were pitted against one another with few rules. Later, fighters employed multiple martial arts into their style while promoters adopted additional rules aimed at increasing safety for competitors and to promote mainstream acceptance of the sport. The first documented use of the name mixed martial arts was in a review of UFC 1 by television critic Howard Rosenberg, in 1993. The term gained popularity when the website newfullcontact.com, then one of the biggest covering the sport, hosted and reprinted the article. The question on who actually coined the name is a question still in debate. Following these changes, the sport has seen increased popularity with a pay-per-view business that rivals boxing and professional wrestling.

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    Connects To Mixed martial arts

    • Ultimate Fighting Championship generated a revenue of about USD 250 million in 2008, about 90% of the entire Mixed Martial Arts industry. from Martial arts

    • This was the origin of the first Ultimate Fighting Championship tournament (later renamed ) in the U.S. inspired by the Brazilian Vale tudo tradition and along with other minimal rule competitions, most notably those from Japan such as Shooto and Pancrase, have evolved into the combat sport of Mixed Martial Arts (MMA). from Martial arts

    • Some competitions pit practitioners of different disciplines against each other using a common set of rules, these are referred to as mixed martial arts competitions. from Martial arts

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    • ;1990 to present During the 1990s Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu became popular and proved to be effective in mixed martial arts competitions such as the UFC and PRIDE. from Martial arts

    • They are rather contemporary regional sports that coexist with the modern forms of martial arts sports as they have developed since the 19th century, often including cross-fertilization between sports and folk styles; thus, the traditional Thai art of muay boran developed into the modern national sport of muay Thai, which in turn came to be practiced worldwide and contributed significantly to modern hybrid styles like kickboxing and mixed martial arts. from Martial arts

    • Originally promoted as a competition with the intention of finding the most effective martial arts for real unarmed combat situations, competitors were pitted against one another with few rules. from Mixed martial arts

    • Mixed martial arts (MMA) is a full-contact combat sport that allows the use of both striking and grappling techniques, both standing and on the ground, from a variety of other combat sports and martial arts. from Mixed martial arts

    • Common martial arts featuring joint locks include Aikido, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Catch Wrestling, Eskrima, Eagle Claw, Fu Jow Pai, Hapkido, Hung Gar, Jujutsu, Judo, Ninjutsu, Shoot wrestling, and mixed martial arts. from Joint lock

    • Leglocks are featured, with various levels of restrictions, in combat sports and martial arts such as Sambo, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, catch wrestling, mixed martial arts, Shootwrestling and submission wrestling, but are banned in some sports featuring joint locks such as judo. from Leglock

    • The term is commonly used in mixed martial arts and other combat sports, as well as various forms of martial arts to designate the set of techniques employed by a combatant that is on the ground, as opposed to techniques employed in stand-up fighting. from Ground fighting

    • Guy Mezger (born January 1, 1968) is a retired American martial artist who competed in professional combat sports ranging from full contact karate, kickboxing, and boxing, but is most recognized as a mixed martial arts fighter (retired from competition January 25, 2005). from Guy Mezger

    • Fish-hooking techniques are disallowed in modern combat sports, mixed martial arts, and martial arts competitions due to the risk of permanent injury. from Fish-hooking

    • Ralph Gracie (the Pitbull; born May 25, 1971) is a Brazilian martial artist who has competed in mixed martial arts. from Ralph Gracie

    • Paleli's interest quickly grew in the arena of martial arts and from there his love of the mixed martial arts grew. from Soa Palelei

    • Full-contact martial arts include boxing, mixed martial arts, Brazilian jiu-jitsu, Muay Thai, judo, and various forms of full contact karate. Also, kickboxing, in the early 1970s in the United States, was born and introduced a controlled version of full contact to martial arts. from Contact sport

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      Kenjutsu Kenjutsu (剣術) is the umbrella term for all (koryū) schools of Japanese swordsmanship, in particular those that…
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      Kenjutsu (剣術) is the umbrella term for all (koryū) schools of Japanese swordsmanship, in particular those that predate the Meiji Restoration. The modern styles of kendo and iaido that were established the 20th century included modern form of kenjutsu in their curriculum too. Kenjutsu, which originated with the samurai class of feudal Japan, means "the method, or technique, of the sword." This is opposed to kendo, which means "the way of the sword".…

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      Kenjutsu (剣術) is the umbrella term for all (koryū) schools of Japanese swordsmanship, in particular those that predate the Meiji Restoration. The modern styles of kendo and iaido that were established the 20th century included modern form of kenjutsu in their curriculum too. Kenjutsu, which originated with the samurai class of feudal Japan, means "the method, or technique, of the sword." This is opposed to kendo, which means "the way of the sword".
      The exact activities and conventions undertaken when practicing kenjutsu vary from school to school, where the word school here refers to the practice, methods, ethics, and metaphysics of a given tradition, yet commonly include practice of battlefield techniques without an opponent and techniques whereby two practitioners perform kata (featuring full contact strikes to the body in some styles and no body contact strikes permitted in others). Historically, schools incorporated sparring under a variety of conditions, from using solid wooden bokutō to use of bamboo sword (shinai) and armor (bōgu). In modern times sparring in Japanese martial art is more strongly associated with kendo.

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    • Sometimes, training with one specific weapon will be considered a style of martial arts in its own right, which is especially the case in Japanese martial arts with disciplines such as kenjutsu and kendo (sword), bojutsu (staff), and kyudo (archery). from Martial arts

    • , meaning " of The ", is a modern Japanese sport/martial art, which descended from swordsmanship (kenjutsu) and uses bamboo swords (shinai) and protective armour (bōgu). from Kendo

    • Ninjutsu was a separate discipline in some traditional Japanese schools, which integrated study of more conventional martial arts along with shurikenjutsu, kenjutsu, sojutsu, bōjutsu, battlefield grappling kumi-uchi (an old form jujutsu) and others. from Ninjutsu

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    • Shurikenjutsu was usually taught among the sogo-bugei, or comprehensive martial arts systems of Japan, as a supplemental art to those more commonly practiced such as kenjutsu, sojutsu, bōjutsu and battlefield grappling kumi-uchi (old form jujutsu), and is much less prevalent today than it was in the feudal era. from Shurikenjutsu

    • is a text on kenjutsu and the martial arts in general, written by the swordsman Miyamoto Musashi circa 1645. from The Book of Five Rings

    • Although it is famous for its jūjutsu, Takenouchi Ryū is actually a complete system of martial arts including armed grappling (yoroi kumiuchi), staff (bōjutsu), sword (kenjutsu), sword drawing (iaijutsu), glaive (naginatajutsu), iron fan (tessenjutsu), restraining rope (hojōjutsu), and resuscitation techniques (sakkatsuhō). from Takenouchi-ryū

    • Some members of the mission also endeavoured to learn Japanese martial arts: Villaret and Kiehl were members of the dojo of Sakakibara Kenkichi, a master of Jikishin Kage Ryu, a form of swordsmanship (Kenjutsu), making them some of the first western students of Japanese martial arts. from French military mission to Japan (1872–80)

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      Iaido Iaido (居合道, Iaidō), abbreviated with iai (居合), is a modern Japanese martial art/sport.Iaido is associated with the…
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      Iaido (居合道, Iaidō), abbreviated with iai (居合), is a modern Japanese martial art/sport.
      Iaido is associated with the smooth, controlled movements of drawing the sword from its scabbard or saya, striking or cutting an opponent, removing blood from the blade, and then replacing the sword in the scabbard. While new practitioners of iaido may start learning…

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      Iaido (居合道, Iaidō), abbreviated with iai (居合), is a modern Japanese martial art/sport.
      Iaido is associated with the smooth, controlled movements of drawing the sword from its scabbard or saya, striking or cutting an opponent, removing blood from the blade, and then replacing the sword in the scabbard. While new practitioners of iaido may start learning with a wooden sword (bokken) depending on the teaching style of a particular instructor, most of the practitioners use the blunt edged sword, called iaitō. Few, more experienced, iaido practitioners use a sharp edged sword (shinken).
      Practitioners of iaido are often referred to as iaidoka.

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    • Perhaps the most recent example of this is point shooting which relies on muscle memory to more effectively utilize a firearm in a variety of awkward situations, much the way an iaidoka would master movements with their sword. from Martial arts

    • Hakama are also regularly worn by practitioners of a variety of martial arts, such as kendo, iaido, taido, aikido, ryu-te, and kyudo. from Hakama

    • Sho Kosugi (ショー・コスギ, born ; June 17, 1948) is a Japanese martial artist with extensive training in shindō jinen-ryū karate, kendo, judo, iaido, kobudo, aikido, and ninjutsu who gained popularity as an actor during the 1980s, usually playing a ninja. from Sho Kosugi

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      Joint lock A joint lock is a grappling technique involving manipulation of an opponent's joints in such a way that the joints…
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      A joint lock is a grappling technique involving manipulation of an opponent's joints in such a way that the joints reach their maximal degree of motion.
      In judo, the combining of standing locks with throws are forbidden due to the risk of physical harm to the falling opponent, while jujutsu, taijutsu, aikido and hapkido allow their use.…

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      A joint lock is a grappling technique involving manipulation of an opponent's joints in such a way that the joints reach their maximal degree of motion.
      In judō these are referred to as, 関節技 kansetsu-waza, "joint locking technique") and in Chinese martial arts as chin na which literally means "catching and locking".
      These typically involve isolating a particular joint and leveraging it in an attempt to force the joint to move past its normal range of motion. Joint locks usually involve varying degrees of pain in the joints and, if applied forcefully and/or suddenly, may cause injury, such as muscle, tendon and ligament damage and even dislocation or bone fracture.
      In judo, the combining of standing locks with throws are forbidden due to the risk of physical harm to the falling opponent, while jujutsu, taijutsu, aikido and hapkido allow their use.
      Joint locks can be divided into five general types according to which section of the body they affect:
      These general types can be further divided into subtypes according to which specific joint(s) they affect, or the type of motion they involve.

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    • Common martial arts featuring joint locks include Aikido, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Catch Wrestling, Eskrima, Eagle Claw, Fu Jow Pai, Hapkido, Hung Gar, Jujutsu, Judo, Ninjutsu, Shoot wrestling, and mixed martial arts. from Joint lock

    • Joint locks are commonly featured in all forms of grappling, whether it be in martial arts, self-defense, combat sport or hand to hand combat application. from Joint lock

    • Japanese jujutsu systems typically emphasis more on throwing, immobilizing and pinning, joint-locking, choking, and strangling techniques as compared with other martial arts systems such as karate. from Jujutsu

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    • Leglocks are featured, with various levels of restrictions, in combat sports and martial arts such as Sambo, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, catch wrestling, mixed martial arts, Shootwrestling and submission wrestling, but are banned in some sports featuring joint locks such as judo. from Leglock

    • Kapu Ku ialua; Kuʻialua; or just Lua; is an ancient Hawaiian martial art based on bone breaking, joint locks, throws, pressure point manipulation, strikes, usage of various weapons, battlefield strategy, open ocean warfare as well as the usage of introduced firearms from the Europeans. from Kapu Kuialua

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      Jackie Chan Jackie Chan, SBS, MBE (born Chan Kong-sang, 陳港生; 7 April 1954) is a Hong Kong actor, action choreographer…
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      Jackie Chan, SBS, MBE (born Chan Kong-sang, 陳港生; 7 April 1954) is a Hong Kong actor, action choreographer, comedian, director, producer, martial artist, screenwriter, entrepreneur, singer, and stunt performer. In his movies, he is known for his acrobatic fighting style, comic timing, use of improvised weapons, and innovative stunts. Chan has been acting since the 1960s and has appeared in over 150 films.…

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      Jackie Chan, SBS, MBE (born Chan Kong-sang, 陳港生; 7 April 1954) is a Hong Kong actor, action choreographer, comedian, director, producer, martial artist, screenwriter, entrepreneur, singer, and stunt performer. In his movies, he is known for his acrobatic fighting style, comic timing, use of improvised weapons, and innovative stunts. Chan has been acting since the 1960s and has appeared in over 150 films.
      Chan has received stars on the Hong Kong Avenue of Stars and the Hollywood Walk of Fame. As a cultural icon, Chan has been referenced in various pop songs, cartoons, and video games. An operatically trained vocalist, Chan is also a Cantopop and Mandopop star, having released a number of albums and sung many of the theme songs for the films in which he has starred. He is also a notable philanthropist.

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    • Jackie Chan and Jet Li are prominent movie figures who have been responsible for promoting Chinese martial arts in recent years. from Martial arts

    • Jackie Chan, SBS, MBE (born Chan Kong-sang, ; 7 April 1954) is a Hong Kong actor, action choreographer, comedian, director, producer, martial artist, screenwriter, entrepreneur, singer, and stunt performer. from Jackie Chan

    • The Jackie Chan Stunt Team ( ), also known as Jackie Chan's Stuntmen Association is a group of stuntmen and martial artists who work alongside Jackie Chan. from Jackie Chan Stunt Team

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    • He is the son of the Chinese martial artist and actor, Jackie Chan and his wife, Lin Feng-Jiao. from Jaycee Chan

    • Overall, it has earned $22.2 million, ranking #42 among all martial arts films released in the US and eighth among the Jackie Chan films distributed in the US. from The Medallion

    • Martial artists and stars such as Jackie Chan and Bruce Lee are known globally, especially in Chinese settlements overseas. from Culture of Hong Kong

    • While best known for Western and Native American themed films, Fusco recently drew on his lifelong background in martial arts to write The Forbidden Kingdom, starring Jet Li and Jackie Chan. from John Fusco

    • A fan of martial arts films starring actors such as Jean-Claude Van Damme and Jackie Chan, Ilunga's main motivation to compete in kickboxing was watching the legendary Remy Bonjasky's fights. from Danyo Ilunga

    • His childhood hero was Jackie Chan, who inspired him to take up martial arts, beginning with judo and then Tae Kwon Do. from Peter Sobotta

    • Growing up Albert idolized martial arts legends Jackie Chan and Jet Li, claiming he wanted to be a "karate master" just like them. from John Albert (fighter)

    • Hansen's passion in martial arts began after seeing Jackie Chan films in his youth and he began training in Brazilian jiu-jitsu when he was 19 years old. from Joachim Hansen (fighter)

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    1. 29
      Japanese martial arts Japanese martial arts refer to the variety of martial arts native to the country of Japan. At least three Japanese…
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      Japanese martial arts refer to the variety of martial arts native to the country of Japan. At least three Japanese terms are used interchangeably with the English phrase "Japanese martial arts":…

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      Japanese martial arts refer to the variety of martial arts native to the country of Japan. At least three Japanese terms are used interchangeably with the English phrase "Japanese martial arts":
      The usage of term "budō" to mean martial arts is a modern one, and historically the term meant a way of life encompassing physical, spiritual, and moral dimensions with a focus of self-improvement, fulfillment, or personal growth. The terms bujutsu and bugei have more discrete definitions, at least historically speaking. Bujutsu refers specifically to the practical application of martial tactics and techniques in actual combat. Bugei refers to the adaptation or refinement of those tactics and techniques to facilitate systematic instruction and dissemination within a formal learning environment.

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    • Likewise, Asian martial arts become well-documented during the medieval period, Japanese martial arts beginning with the establishment of the samurai nobility in the 12th century, Chinese martial arts with Ming era treatises such as Ji Xiao Xin Shu, Indian martial arts in medieval texts such as the Agni Purana and the Malla Purana, and Korean martial arts from the Joseon era and texts such as Muyejebo (1598). from Martial arts

    • Sometimes, training with one specific weapon will be considered a style of martial arts in its own right, which is especially the case in Japanese martial arts with disciplines such as kenjutsu and kendo (sword), bojutsu (staff), and kyudo (archery). from Martial arts

    • or martial art. from Japanese martial arts

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    • Japanese martial arts refer to the variety of martial arts native to the country of Japan. from Japanese martial arts

    • was a martial artist and founder of the Japanese martial art of aikido. from Morihei Ueshiba

    • A throw is a martial arts term for a grappling technique that involves off-balancing or lifting an opponent, and throwing them to the ground, in Japanese martial arts referred to as nage-waza, 投げ技, "throwing technique". from Throw (grappling)

    • Tokaido's founder, Shizuo Sugiura, was a martial arts enthusiast who would watch demonstrations and competitions of many different Japanese martial arts. With time, he became increasingly interested in the art of karate. from Tokaido (company)

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      Savate Savate (French pronunciation: ​[savat]), also known as boxe française, French boxing, French kickboxing or French…
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      Savate (French pronunciation: ​[savat]), also known as boxe française, French boxing, French kickboxing or French footfighting, is a traditional French martial art which uses the hands and feet as weapons combining elements of western boxing with graceful kicking techniques.…

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      Savate (French pronunciation: ​[savat]), also known as boxe française, French boxing, French kickboxing or French footfighting, is a traditional French martial art which uses the hands and feet as weapons combining elements of western boxing with graceful kicking techniques.
      Only foot kicks are allowed unlike some systems such as muay thai, and silat which allow the use of the knees or shins. Savate is a French word for "old shoe". Savate is perhaps the only style of kickboxing in which the fighters habitually wear shoes. A male practitioner of savate is called a savateur while a female is called a savateuse, or tireur/tireuse.

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    • Jeet Kune Do, the system he founded, has its roots in Wing Chun, western boxing, savate and fencing. from Martial arts

    • Savate ( ), also known as boxe française, French boxing, French kickboxing or French footfighting, is a traditional French martial art which uses the hands and feet as weapons combining elements of western boxing with graceful kicking techniques. from Savate

    • Martial arts and combat sports that emphasize stand-up fighting include boxing, escrima, jōdō, karate, kendo, kickboxing, kung fu, muay thai, savate, fistfighting, silat and taekwondo. from Stand-up fighting

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    • Roundhouse kicks are particularly present in Eastern martial arts, although the French style of savate (Boxe Française) developed this kind of technique without any contact with the East. from Roundhouse kick

    • French martial arts include Savate and Fencing. from France

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      Sanshou Sanda, Sanshou, Chinese boxing / Chinese kickboxing or an "unsanctioned fight" is a Chinese self-defense system and…
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      Sanda, Sanshou, Chinese boxing / Chinese kickboxing or an "unsanctioned fight" is a Chinese self-defense system and combat sport. Sanshou is a martial art which was originally developed by the Chinese military based upon the study and practices of traditional Kung fu and modern combat fighting techniques; it combines full-contact kickboxing, which include close range…

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      Sanda, Sanshou, Chinese boxing / Chinese kickboxing or an "unsanctioned fight" is a Chinese self-defense system and combat sport. Sanshou is a martial art which was originally developed by the Chinese military based upon the study and practices of traditional Kung fu and modern combat fighting techniques; it combines full-contact kickboxing, which include close range and rapid successive punches and kicks, with wrestling, takedowns, throws, sweeps, kick catches, and in some competitions, even elbow and knee strikes.
      Not seen as a style itself, rather it is considered as just one of the two components of Chinese martial arts training and is often taught alongside with taolu (forms) training. However, as part of the development of sport wushu by the Chinese government, a standard curriculum for sanshou was developed. It is to this standard curriculum that the term "Sanshou" is usually applied.
      This curriculum was developed with reference to traditional Chinese martial arts. This general Sanshou curriculum varies in its different forms, as the Chinese government developed a version for civilians for self-defense and as a sport.

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    • Also during the 20th century, a number of martial arts were adapted for self-defense purposes for military hand-to-hand combat. World War II combatives, Kapap (1930s) and Krav Maga (1950s) in Israel, Systema (Soviet era Russia), San Shou (People's Republic of China). from Martial arts

    • At an early age, he received martial arts training from his father, who had perfected a unique martial art that fused karate with Chinese boxing. from Takuma Tsurugi

    • In Beijing, China, Wu Jing prepared for his role by training in Sanshou martial arts. from Fatal Contact (film)

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    • Wu Jing played Kong Ko who is trained with the fighting techniques of Sanshou martial arts, and lured into the world of illegal martial arts fighting. from Fatal Contact (film)

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      Wushu (sport) Wushu (simplified Chinese: 武术; traditional Chinese: 武術) is both an exhibition and a full-contact sport derived from…
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      Wushu (simplified Chinese: 武术; traditional Chinese: 武術) is both an exhibition and a full-contact sport derived from traditional Chinese martial arts. It was developed in China after 1949, in an effort to standardize the practice of traditional Chinese martial arts, although attempts to structure the various decentralized martial arts traditions date back earlier, when the…

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      Wushu (simplified Chinese: 武术; traditional Chinese: 武術) is both an exhibition and a full-contact sport derived from traditional Chinese martial arts. It was developed in China after 1949, in an effort to standardize the practice of traditional Chinese martial arts, although attempts to structure the various decentralized martial arts traditions date back earlier, when the Central Guoshu Institute was established at Nanking in 1928. The term wushu is Chinese for "martial arts" (武 "Wu" = military or martial, 术 "Shu" = art). In contemporary times, wushu has become an international sport through the International Wushu Federation (IWUF), which holds the World Wushu Championships every two years; the first World Championships were held in 1991 in Beijing and won by Yuan Wen Qing.
      Competitive wushu is composed of two disciplines: taolu (套路; forms) and sanda (散打; sparring).
      Taolu involves martial art patterns and maneuvers for which competitors are judged and given points according to specific rules. The forms comprise basic movements (stances, kicks, punches, balances, jumps, sweeps and throws) based on aggregate categories of traditional Chinese martial art styles and can be changed for competitions to highlight one's strengths. Competitive forms have time limits that can range from 1 minute, 20 seconds for some external styles to over five minutes for internal styles. Modern wushu competitors are increasingly training in aerial techniques such as 540-, 720-, and even 900-degree jumps and kicks to add more difficulty and style to their forms.
      Sanda (sometimes called sanshou or Lei tai) is a modern fighting method and sport influenced by traditional Chinese boxing, Chinese wrestling methods called Shuai jiao and other Chinese grappling techniques such as Chin Na. It has all the combat aspects of wushu. Sanda appears much like Kickboxing or Muay Thai, but includes many more grappling techniques. Sanda fighting competitions are often held alongside taolu or form competitions.

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    Connects To Wushu (sport)

    • Martial traditions have been influenced by governments to become more sport-like for political purposes; the central impetus for the attempt by the People's Republic of China in transforming Chinese martial arts into the committee-regulated sport of wushu was suppressing what they saw as the potentially subversive aspects of martial training, especially under the traditional system of family lineages. from Martial arts

    • The Summer Olympic Games includes judo, taekwondo, western archery, boxing, javelin, wrestling and fencing as events, while Chinese wushu recently failed in its bid to be included, but is still actively performed in tournaments across the world. from Martial arts

    • Taolu involves martial art patterns and maneuvers for which competitors are judged and given points according to specific rules. from Wushu (sport)

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    • A butterfly kick or horse kick (xuànzi 旋子 circle) is a jumping kick in martial arts such as modern wushu and taekwondo and capoeira. from Butterfly kick

    • Aerial cartwheels are performed in gymnastics, cheerleading, acro dance, free running and in martial arts such as Wushu and Capoeira. from Aerial cartwheel

    • It derived from martial arts forms (Kata, Taolu and more) such as Karate, Capoeira, Wushu, Tae Kwon Do, kalarippayattu incorporating techniques found in gymnastics, break dancing, and similar disciplines. from Tricking (martial arts)

    • Wang Ju-Rong (1928–2006) was a Chinese-Muslim martial artist and Wushu professor in the Shanghai Institute of Physical Education. from Wang Ju-Rong

    • Hüseyin Dündar (born 1986 in Adana, Turkey) is a Turkish martial arts performer competing in the boxing, kickboxing, Muay Thai and wushu disciplines. from Hüseyin Dündar

    • She holds six Black belts in various Far Eastern martial disciplines, including Tang Soo Do (also "tangsudo", Korean), Tae Kwon Do (Korean), Eagle Claw (Chinese), Wu Shu (contemporary Chinese), Northern Shaolin (classical Chinese), and Pai Lum Tao Kung Fu (contemporary Chinese). from Cynthia Rothrock

    • Lotz is also a martial artist, with some training in Taekwondo, Wushu and Muay Thai. from Caity Lotz

    • Tao is a martial artist, and has been practicing Wushu since he was five years old. from List of Exo members

    • Men's rhythmic gymnastics is related to both Men's artistic gymnastics and wushu martial arts. from Rhythmic gymnastics

    • Tao is a martial artist, and has been practicing Wushu since he was five years old. from Tao Huang Zitao

    • Wushu and T'ai chi ch'uan utilise traditional Chinese techniques, including breathing and energy exercises, meditation, martial arts, as well as practices linked to traditional Chinese medicine, such as dieting, massage and acupuncture. from Personal development

    • According to her, she owes her nice body to her new found devotion to Muay Thai and Wushu, both are forms of Martial Arts. from Marian Rivera

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      Korean martial arts Korean martial arts (Hangul: 무술 or 무예, Hanja: 武術 or 武藝) are military practices and methods which have their place…
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      Korean martial arts (Hangul: 무술 or 무예, Hanja: 武術 or 武藝) are military practices and methods which have their place in the history of Korea but have been adapted for use by both military and non-military personnel as a method of personal growth or recreation. Among the best recognized Korean practices using weapons are traditional…

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      Korean martial arts (Hangul: 무술 or 무예, Hanja: 武術 or 武藝) are military practices and methods which have their place in the history of Korea but have been adapted for use by both military and non-military personnel as a method of personal growth or recreation. Among the best recognized Korean practices using weapons are traditional Korean Archery and Kumdo, the Korean sword sport similar to Japanese Kendo. The best known unarmed Korean Martial Arts Taekwondo and Hapkido though such traditional practices such as ssireum - Korean Wrestling - and taekkyeon - Korean Foot Fighting - are rapidly gaining in popularity both inside and outside of the country. In November 2011, Taekkyeon was recognized by UNESCO and placed on its Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity List. There has also been a revival of traditional Korean swordsmanship arts as well as knife fighting and archery. Today, Korean martial arts are being practiced worldwide. More than one in a hundred of the world's population practices some form of taekwondo.

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    Connects To Korean martial arts

    • Likewise, Asian martial arts become well-documented during the medieval period, Japanese martial arts beginning with the establishment of the samurai nobility in the 12th century, Chinese martial arts with Ming era treatises such as Ji Xiao Xin Shu, Indian martial arts in medieval texts such as the Agni Purana and the Malla Purana, and Korean martial arts from the Joseon era and texts such as Muyejebo (1598). from Martial arts

    • Choi Hong Hi (9 November 1918 – 15 June 2002), also known as General Choi, was a South Korean army general and martial artist who is a controversial figure in the history of the Korean martial art of taekwondo. from Choi Hong Hi

    • Passai (拔塞/パッサイ also "Bassai / バッサイ") is the name of a group of kata practiced in different styles of martial arts, including karate and various Korean martial arts (Taekwondo, Tang Soo Do, Soo Bahk Do). from Passai

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    • Rhee Taekwon-Do (리태권도; 李跆拳道), also known as Rhee Tae Kwon-Do, Rhee Tae Kwon Do, or Rhee Taekwondo, is a martial art school in Australia and New Zealand teaching the Korean martial art of taekwondo. from Rhee Taekwon-Do

    • Duk Sung Son (Hangul: 손덕성, Hanja: 孫德成) (June 17, 1922 – March 29, 2011) was a martial artist, Grand Master, 9th degree black belt, Co-Founder of the Korean martial art of Tae Kwon Do, successor of Won Kuk Lee and leader of the Chung Do Kwan school (1950–1959). from Duk Sung Son

    • Many martial arts employ the use of common objects as weapons; Okinawan karate features items of farming equipment that were later used as weapons by Okinawan peasants due the prohibition of weapons imposed by the shogun regime during feudal times; Filipino martial arts such as Eskrima include practice with machetes, canes, bamboo spears, and knives as a result of the 400 year Spanish colonization that took place in the Philippines which prohibited the ownership and use of standard swords and bladed weapons; Chinese martial arts and some Korean martial arts commonly feature the use of improvised weapons such as fans, hammers and . from Improvised weapon

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      Stick-fighting Stick-fighting or stickfighting (sometimes spelled stick fighting) is a generic term for martial arts which use…
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      Stick-fighting or stickfighting (sometimes spelled stick fighting) is a generic term for martial arts which use simple long slender, blunt, hand-held, generally wooden 'sticks' for fighting such as a staff, cane, walking stick, baton or similar.…

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      Stick-fighting or stickfighting (sometimes spelled stick fighting) is a generic term for martial arts which use simple long slender, blunt, hand-held, generally wooden 'sticks' for fighting such as a staff, cane, walking stick, baton or similar.
      Some techniques can also be used with a sturdy umbrella or even a sword in its scabbard, but thicker and/or heavier blunt weapons such as clubs or the mace are outside the scope of "stick-fighting" (since they cannot be wielded with such precision, so sheer force of impact is more important) as are more formed weapons such as the taiaha used by the Māori of New Zealand, and the macuahuitl of Aztec warfare.
      Although many systems are defensive combat techniques intended for use if attacked while lightly armed, others such as kendo (a Japanese discipline using a bamboo sword, the shinai) and gatka (a north Indian discipline in which the sticks simulate swords) were developed as safe training methods for dangerous weapons. Whatever their history, many stick-fighting techniques lend themselves to being treated as sports.
      In addition to systems specifically devoted to stick-fighting, certain other disciplines include it, either in its own right, as in the Tamil martial art silambam, or merely as part of a polyvalent training including other weapons and/or bare handed fighting, as in Kerala's kalaripayat tradition, where these wooden weapons serve as preliminary training before practice of the more dangerous metal weapons.

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    • He also founded an eclectic style named Bartitsu which combined jujutsu, judo, boxing, savate and stick fighting. from Martial arts

    • Other examples include forms of stick fighting and boxing. from Martial arts

    • Stick-fighting or stickfighting (sometimes spelled stick fighting) is a generic term for martial arts which use simple long slender, blunt, hand-held, generally wooden 'sticks' for fighting such as a staff, cane, walking stick, baton or similar. from Stick-fighting

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    • Eskrima, Arnis, and Kali are umbrella terms for the traditional martial arts of the Philippines ("Filipino Martial Arts," or FMA) that emphasize weapon-based fighting with sticks, knives and other bladed weapons, and various improvised weapons. from Eskrima

    • , translated from Japanese as "staff technique", is the martial art of using a staff weapon called bō which simply means "staff". from Bōjutsu

    • The hanbō (半棒, lit. "half-staff") is a staff used in martial arts. from Hanbō

    • Singlestick, also known as cudgels, refers to both a martial art that uses a wooden stick as well as the weapon used in the art. from Singlestick

    • Juego del garrote (garrote game) or juego del garrote ('garotte game of Lara') is a Venezuelan martial art that involves machete, garrote stick-fighting, and knife fencing. from Juego del garrote

    • Juego del palo ( , game of the stick) is a traditional martial art/folk sport of stick-fighting practiced in the Canary Islands. from Juego del palo

    • Stick fighting in kalaripayattu, a martial art of India, makes use of several kinds of sticks. from Kalarippayattu stick-fighting

    • Due to its durability and resistance to splintering, sections of rattan can be used as staves or canes for martial arts— 70 cm-long rattan sticks, called baston, are used in Filipino martial arts, especially Modern Arnis and Eskrima and for the striking weapons in the Society for Creative Anachronism's full-contact "heavy combat". from Rattan

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    1. 35
      Neijia Nèijiā (Chinese: 內家; literally: "internal school") is a term in Chinese martial arts, grouping those styles that…
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      Nèijiā (Chinese: 內家; literally: "internal school") is a term in Chinese martial arts, grouping those styles that practice nèijìng (Chinese: 內勁; literally: "internal strength"), usually translated as internal martial arts, occupied with spiritual, mental or qi-related aspects, as opposed to an "external" (Chinese: 外; pinyin: wài) approach focused on physiological aspects. The distinction dates to…

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      Nèijiā (Chinese: 內家; literally: "internal school") is a term in Chinese martial arts, grouping those styles that practice nèijìng (Chinese: 內勁; literally: "internal strength"), usually translated as internal martial arts, occupied with spiritual, mental or qi-related aspects, as opposed to an "external" (Chinese: 外; pinyin: wài) approach focused on physiological aspects. The distinction dates to the 17th century, but its modern application is due to publications by Sun Lutang, dating to the period of 1915 to 1928. Nèijìng is developed by using "nèigōng" (內功), or "internal exercises," as opposed to "wàigōng" (外功), "external exercises."
      Wǔdāngquán is a more specific grouping of internal martial arts named for their association with the Taoist monasteries of Wudangshan range, Hubei Province in Chinese popular legend. These styles were enumerated by Sun Lutang as Tàijíquán, Xíngyìquán and Bāguàzhǎng, but most also include Bājíquán and the legendary Wudang Sword.
      Some other Chinese arts, not in the Wudangquan group, such as Qigong, Liuhebafa, Bak Mei Pai, Zi Ran Men (Nature Boxing), Bok Foo Pai and Yiquan are frequently classified (or classify themselves) as "internal".

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    • Yang Luchan (1799–1872) was an important teacher of the internal martial art known as t'ai chi ch'uan in Beijing during the second half of the 19th century. from Chinese martial arts

    • In its broadest sense, Northern Shaolin ( ) refers to the external (as opposed to internal) martial arts of Northern China referring to those styles from the Northern Shaolin Monastery in Henan. from Northern Shaolin (martial art)

    • Yang Chengfu or Yang Ch'eng-fu (1883–1936) is historically considered the best known teacher of the soft style martial art of Yang-style t'ai chi ch'uan (Yang-style Taijiquan). from Yang Chengfu

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    • Hsu Hung-Chi or Xu Hongji ( ) (1934-1984) was a Taiwanese martial artist who specialized in the internal Chinese arts of xingyiquan, baguazhang and taijiquan. from Hsu Hung-Chi

    • He learned the internal martial art of Xinyiquan (Heart and Intention Boxing) from Dai Wenxiong, son of Dai Long Bang, and later modified the style into Xingyiquan (Form and Intention Boxing). from Li Luoneng

    • Wu Chien Ch'uan or Wu Jianquan (1870–1942), was a famous teacher and founder of the neijia martial art of Wu-style t'ai chi ch'uan in late Imperial and early Republican China. from Wu Chien-ch'uan

    • Yang Zhenduo began studying the soft style martial art of t'ai chi ch'uan (taijiquan) at age 6 with his father, and continued studying with his elder brothers Yang Zhen Ming (Shou Zhong), Yang Zhen Ji, and his younger brother Yang Zhen Guo after his father died. from Yang Zhenduo

    • Yang Jianhou (1839–1917), or Yang Chien-hou, was the younger son of the founder of Yang-style t'ai chi ch'uan, Yang Lu-ch'an, and a well known teacher of the soft style martial art of t'ai chi ch'uan (taijiquan) in late Qing dynasty China. from Yang Jianhou

    • Hung I-Hsiang or Hong Yixiang ( ) (1925–1993) was a Taiwanese martial artist who specialized in the internal Chinese styles of xingyiquan, baguazhang and taijiquan. from Hung I-Hsiang

    • These three internal arts were categorized as such by Sun Lutang, who greatly popularized the terms "neijia" and "wàijiā" as a method of classifying martial arts. from List of Chinese martial arts

    • A legendary culture hero, Zhang Sanfeng is credited by modern practitioners as having originated the concepts of neijia (內家); soft, internal martial arts, specifically T'ai chi ch'uan, as a result of a Neo-Confucian syncretism of Chán Buddhist Shaolin martial arts with his mastery of Taoist Tao Yin (neigong) principles. from Zhang Sanfeng

    • Yang Jun began studying and training in the soft style martial art of t'ai chi ch'uan at age 5 with his grandfather Yang Zhenduo, who raised him. from Yang Jun (martial artist)

    • Wu Kung-i or Wu Gongyi (1898–1970) was a well-known teacher of the soft style martial art t'ai chi ch'uan (taijiquan) in China, and, after 1949, in the British colony of Hong Kong. from Wu Kung-i

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      Kyokushin Kyokushin (極真) is a style of stand-up, full contact karate, founded in 1964 by Zainichi Korean Masutatsu Oyama…
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      Kyokushin (極真) is a style of stand-up, full contact karate, founded in 1964 by Zainichi Korean Masutatsu Oyama (大山倍達, Ōyama Masutatsu) who was born under the name Choi Young-Eui. 최영의. Kyokushin is Japanese for "the ultimate truth." Kyokushin is rooted in a philosophy of self-improvement, discipline and hard training. Its full contact style has had international appeal (practitioners have over the last 40+ years numbered more than 12 million).

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    Connects To Kyokushin

    • Kyokushin karate requires advanced practitioners to engage in bare-knuckled, full-contact sparring while wearing only a karate gi and groin protector but does not allow punches to the face, only kicks and knees. from Martial arts

    • Kanji is the representation (using Chinese characters) of the word Kyokushinkai, which is the name of the ryu or style. from Kyokushin

    • Plas began his career in martial arts in karate, learning Kyokushin from Jon Bluming. from Jan Plas

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    • Peter "The Hurricane" Smit (December 24, 1961 – August 15, 2005) was a Dutch martial artist who mastered such different fight disciplines as kyokushin karate, kickboxing and Muay Thai. from Peter Smit

    • Hemmers began his martial arts training in judo at the age of 6, which he studied until the age of 15 when he switched to Kyokushin Karate. from Cor Hemmers

    • Glunder began practicing martial arts at the age of 18, with Kyokushin kaikan and Taekwondo. from Rodney Glunder

    • Originally aiming to be an action star, starting with Shorinji Kempo, he eventually took up Kyokushin kaikan. Sanada began training at the age of 11 with actor and martial arts star Sonny Chiba's Japan Action Club, where he developed good all-round martial arts ability, and soon became Chiba's protégé. from Hiroyuki Sanada

    • Shugyo in martial arts, particularly in the Shotokai and Kyokushin styles of Karate, it is a form of extreme spiritual discipline. from Prostration

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      Self-defense Self-defense or self-defence (see spelling differences) is a countermeasure that involves defending oneself, one's…
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      Self-defense or self-defence (see spelling differences) is a countermeasure that involves defending oneself, one's property, or the well-being of another from harm. The use of the right of self-defense as a legal justification for the use of force in times of danger is available in many jurisdictions, but the interpretation varies widely.

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    Connects To Self-defense

    • Also during the 20th century, a number of martial arts were adapted for self-defense purposes for military hand-to-hand combat. World War II combatives, Kapap (1930s) and Krav Maga (1950s) in Israel, Systema (Soviet era Russia), San Shou (People's Republic of China). from Martial arts

    • By application or intent: self-defense, combat sport, choreography or demonstration of forms, physical fitness, meditation, etc. from Martial arts

    • Martial arts are codified systems and traditions of combat practices, which are practiced for a variety of reasons: self-defense, competition, physical health and fitness, entertainment, as well as mental, physical, and spiritual development. from Martial arts

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    • Many styles of martial arts are practiced for self-defense or include self-defense techniques. from Self-defense

    • Joint locks are commonly featured in all forms of grappling, whether it be in martial arts, self-defense, combat sport or hand to hand combat application. from Joint lock

    • Grappling is a general term that covers techniques used in many disciplines, styles and martial arts that are practiced both as combat sports and for self defense. from Grappling

    • Brazilian jiu-jitsu ( ; , , ) (BJJ; Portuguese: jiu-jitsu brasileiro) is a martial art, combat sport, and a self defense system that focuses on grappling and especially ground fighting. from Brazilian jiu-jitsu

    • Bartitsu is an eclectic martial art and self-defence method originally developed in England during the years 1898–1902. from Bartitsu

    • Wristlocks are very common in martial arts such as Aikido, Hapkido and jujutsu where they are featured as self-defense techniques. from Wristlock

    • Chokeholds are used in martial arts, combat sports, self-defense, law enforcement and in military hand to hand combat applications. from Chokehold

    • However, and often taught as a self-defense technique in martial arts and combatives. from Grappling hold

    • Defendo is a martial art and self defense system created in 1945 for law enforcement by Bill Underwood, a British-born Canadian. from Defendo

    • Real Aikido (Serbian: Реални аикидо) is a martial art developed by Ljubomir Vračarević, a self-defence instructor from Serbia. from Real Aikido

    • Combat pistol shooting is a modern martial art that focuses on the use of the handgun as a defensive weapon for self defense, or for military and police use. from Combat pistol shooting

    • The company publishes non-fiction books and videos covering a wide range of specialty topics, including (but not limited to) personal and financial freedom, survivalism and preparedness, firearms and shooting, various martial arts and self-defense, military and police tactics, investigation techniques, spying, lockpicking, sabotage, revenge, knives and knife fighting, explosives, and other "action topics" (though the availability of books on topics like improvised explosives has been severely curtailed in recent years). from Paladin Press

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      Okinawan kobudō Okinawan kobudō (沖縄古武道) refers to the weapon systems of Okinawan martial arts.Okinawan kobudō is also known as…
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      Okinawan kobudō (沖縄古武道) refers to the weapon systems of Okinawan martial arts.
      Okinawan kobudō is also known as Ryūkyū Kobujutsu (琉球古武術).

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    Connects To Okinawan kobudō

    • Such traditions include eskrima, silat, kalaripayat, kobudo, and historical European martial arts, especially those of the German Renaissance. from Martial arts

    • The styles listed below may practice strictly weapons, or may practice another martial arts (usually karate) as well. from Okinawan kobudō

    • Okinawan martial arts refers to the martial arts, such as karate, tegumi and Okinawan kobudō, which originated among the indigenous people of Okinawa Island. from Okinawan martial arts

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    • The tambo is used in several martial arts including: jujutsu, aikido, kobudo, hapkido, yoseikan budo, Cuong Nhu. from Tambo (weapon)

    • Sho Kosugi (ショー・コスギ, born ; June 17, 1948) is a Japanese martial artist with extensive training in shindō jinen-ryū karate, kendo, judo, iaido, kobudo, aikido, and ninjutsu who gained popularity as an actor during the 1980s, usually playing a ninja. from Sho Kosugi

    • Rosa Nales is also a martial artist in the arts of Ju Jitsu and Karate Kobudo; he obtained the rank of Black belt, 8th degree. from Pedro Rosa Nales

    • This led to the development of the indigenous martial art karate, which utilizes domestic items as weapons. from History of the Ryukyu Islands

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      Strike (attack) A strike is a directed physical attack with either an inanimate object (such as a weapon) or with a part of the…
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      A strike is a directed physical attack with either an inanimate object (such as a weapon) or with a part of the human body intended to cause blunt trauma or penetrating trauma upon an opponent. There are many different varieties of strikes. An attack with the hand closed into a fist is called a punch;…

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      A strike is a directed physical attack with either an inanimate object (such as a weapon) or with a part of the human body intended to cause blunt trauma or penetrating trauma upon an opponent. There are many different varieties of strikes. An attack with the hand closed into a fist is called a punch; an attack with the leg or foot is referred to as a kick; and an attack with the head is called a headbutt. There are also other variations employed in martial arts and combat sports. Buffet or beat refer to repeatedly and violently striking an opponent. Also commonly referred to as a combination, or combo, especially in boxing or fighting video games.

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    How Martial arts
    Connects To Strike (attack)

    • ;Unarmed Unarmed martial arts can be broadly grouped into focusing on strikes, those focusing on grappling and those that cover both fields, often described as hybrid martial arts. from Martial arts

    • There are also other variations employed in martial arts and combat sports. from Strike (attack)

    • Mixed martial arts (MMA) is a full-contact combat sport that allows the use of both striking and grappling techniques, both standing and on the ground, from a variety of other combat sports and martial arts. from Mixed martial arts

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    • Arlovski began taking a greater interest in other martial arts, studying kickboxing and developing his striking skills to complement his Sambo-based grappling abilities. from Andrei Arlovski

    • More formal systems have been codified in various forms of martial arts worldwide, where grappling techniques form a significant subset of unarmed fighting (complemented by striking techniques). from History of wrestling

    • The unique form of sport portrayed is fundamentally based on classical and "catch" wrestling, with modern additions of striking attacks, strength-based holds and throws, and acrobatic maneuvers; much of these derive from the influence of various international martial arts. from Professional wrestling

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      Ultimate Fighting Championship The Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) is the largest mixed martial arts promotion company in the world featuring…
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      The Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) is the largest mixed martial arts promotion company in the world featuring most of the top-ranked fighters in the sport. Based in the United States, the UFC produces events worldwide. The organization showcases nine weight divisions and enforces the Unified Rules of Mixed Martial Arts. The UFC promotes a brand…

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      The Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) is the largest mixed martial arts promotion company in the world featuring most of the top-ranked fighters in the sport. Based in the United States, the UFC produces events worldwide. The organization showcases nine weight divisions and enforces the Unified Rules of Mixed Martial Arts. The UFC promotes a brand of MMA which is self-acknowledged as "not just a sporting event; it is also entertainment and theater. The fighters are athletes and performers both." The UFC has held over 250 events to date. Dana White serves as the president of the UFC while brothers Frank and Lorenzo Fertitta control the UFC's parent company, Zuffa, LLC.
      The first UFC event was held on November 12, 1993 in Denver, Colorado. The purpose of the early UFC competitions was to identify the most effective martial art in a real fight between competitors of different fighting disciplines, including Boxing, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Sambo, Wrestling, Muay Thai, Karate, Judo, and other styles. In subsequent competitions, fighters began adopting effective techniques from more than one discipline, which indirectly helped create an entirely separate style of fighting known as present-day mixed martial arts.
      With a TV deal and expansion into Canada, Europe, Australia the Middle East, Asia and new markets within the United States, the UFC as of 2014 has gained in popularity, along with greater mainstream-media coverage. As of 2014 viewers can access UFC programming on pay-per-view television in the U.S., Brazil, Australia, Canada, New Zealand and Italy. UFC programming can also be found on Fox, Fox Sports 1 and Fox Sports 2 in the U.S., on BT Sport in the United Kingdom and Ireland, as well as in 150 countries and 22 different languages worldwide. UFC programming is shown in 130 countries worldwide, and the UFC plans to continue expanding internationally, running shows regularly in Canada, Brazil and the U.K., with an office established in the U.K. aimed to expand the European audience.
      The UFC has also bought and absorbed rival promotions Pride, World Extreme Cagefighting as well as Strikeforce and EliteXC

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    How Martial arts
    Connects To Ultimate Fighting Championship

    • Ultimate Fighting Championship generated a revenue of about USD 250 million in 2008, about 90% of the entire Mixed Martial Arts industry. from Martial arts

    • This was the origin of the first Ultimate Fighting Championship tournament (later renamed ) in the U.S. inspired by the Brazilian Vale tudo tradition and along with other minimal rule competitions, most notably those from Japan such as Shooto and Pancrase, have evolved into the combat sport of Mixed Martial Arts (MMA). from Martial arts

    • Nearly all mixed martial arts organizations such as UFC, Pancrase, Shooto use a form of full-contact rules, as do professional boxing organizations and K-1. from Martial arts

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    • ;1990 to present During the 1990s Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu became popular and proved to be effective in mixed martial arts competitions such as the UFC and PRIDE. from Martial arts

    • The purpose of the early UFC competitions was to identify the most effective martial art in a real fight between competitors of different fighting disciplines, including Boxing, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Sambo, Wrestling, Muay Thai, Karate, Judo, and other styles. from Ultimate Fighting Championship

    • He officially began training in Brazilian jiu-jitsu when he was 19 years old, being interested in the martial art after watching several UFC fights on television. from David Terrell (fighter)

    • Mark Holst (born August 14, 1984) is a Canadian martial artist from Ottawa, Ontario, who has fought in the UFC. from Mark Holst

    • The music video for this song was directed by Dean Karr, who had also directed the video for their previous single Remedy, and features frontman Shaun Morgan disguised as a ring announcer, in a boxing ring, for a total of three fights: Round 1: Santa Claus vs. the New Years Baby (who is played by Martin Klebba), Round 2: Mardi Gras Woman vs. the Pumpkin King, and for the Main event, The Easter Bunny vs. Uncle Sam, who ended up portrayed by UFC martial artist, Tito Ortiz. from Truth (Seether song)

    • He began training in martial arts soon after this however, being taught by a prominent Japanese Ju-Jitsu master in the Huntington-area, and considered taking part in the Ultimate Fighting Championship but Gregg couldn't dedicate the time needed to excel while working full-time and preparing his Master's Thesis and studying for comps. from Gregg Groothuis

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      Hand-to-hand combat Hand-to-hand combat (sometimes abbreviated as HTH or H2H) is a lethal or non-lethal physical confrontation between…
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      Hand-to-hand combat (sometimes abbreviated as HTH or H2H) is a lethal or non-lethal physical confrontation between two or more persons at very short range (grappling distance) that does not involve the use of firearms or other distance weapons. While the phrase "hand-to-hand" appears to refer to unarmed combat, the term is generic and may include…

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      Hand-to-hand combat (sometimes abbreviated as HTH or H2H) is a lethal or non-lethal physical confrontation between two or more persons at very short range (grappling distance) that does not involve the use of firearms or other distance weapons. While the phrase "hand-to-hand" appears to refer to unarmed combat, the term is generic and may include use of striking weapons used at grappling distance such as knives, sticks, batons, or improvised weapons such as entrenching tools. While the term hand-to-hand combat originally referred principally to engagements by military personnel on the battlefield, it can also refer to any personal physical engagement by two or more combatants, including police officers and civilians.
      Combat within close quarters (to a range just beyond grappling distance) is commonly termed close combat or close-quarters combat. It may include lethal and non-lethal weapons and methods depending upon the restrictions imposed by civilian law, military rules of engagement, or ethical codes. Close combat using firearms or other distance weapons by military combatants at the tactical level is modernly referred to as close quarter battle. The U.S. Army uses the term combatives to describe various military fighting systems used in hand-to-hand combat training, systems which may incorporate eclectic techniques from several different martial arts and combat sports.

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    How Martial arts
    Connects To Hand-to-hand combat

    • Also during the 20th century, a number of martial arts were adapted for self-defense purposes for military hand-to-hand combat. World War II combatives, Kapap (1930s) and Krav Maga (1950s) in Israel, Systema (Soviet era Russia), San Shou (People's Republic of China). from Martial arts

    • After absorbing the most appropriate elements from a variety of martial-arts experts, from China, Japan and elsewhere, he condensed these arts into a practical combat system he called Defendu. from Hand-to-hand combat

    • There are many varieties within the martial arts, including boxing and wrestling. from Hand-to-hand combat

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    • The U.S. Army uses the term combatives to describe various military fighting systems used in hand-to-hand combat training, systems which may incorporate eclectic techniques from several different martial arts and combat sports. from Hand-to-hand combat

    • Joint locks are commonly featured in all forms of grappling, whether it be in martial arts, self-defense, combat sport or hand to hand combat application. from Joint lock

    • Chokeholds are used in martial arts, combat sports, self-defense, law enforcement and in military hand to hand combat applications. from Chokehold

    • In martial arts, the terms hard and soft technique denote how forcefully a defender martial artist counters the force of an attack in armed and unarmed combat. from Hard and soft (martial arts)

    • More formal systems have been codified in various forms of martial arts worldwide, where grappling techniques form a significant subset of unarmed fighting (complemented by striking techniques). from History of wrestling

    • Despite his specialist training in these non-combat specific areas, and also despite Ramos' slight physical build and his glasses, Ramos is not to be underestimated on appearance; Ramos is actually the best trained commando of the Zero Tolerance squad in hand to hand combat. Ramos has lightning-quick speed and studied extensively in over fourteen different martial arts. from Zero Tolerance (video game)

    • Shown to be a skilled martial artist, Huey often demonstrates on various occasions an ability with nunchaku, katana, Gun (staff), as well as hand to hand combat that far surpasses the expected capabilities of a ten-year-old. from Huey Freeman

    • More technical variants of manual strangulation are referred to as chokeholds, and are extensively practiced and used in various martial arts, combat sports, self-defense systems, and in military hand-to-hand combat application. from Strangling

    • He is also highly adept at hand-to-hand combat, and has been trained in multiple forms of martial arts. from Punisher

    • Members of the Elite Force are trained for six months at the Elite Police Training School (EPTS) at Badian, Lahore, by Pakistan's Special Service Group in personal combat, martial arts, crowd control, close quarters battle (CQB), and reconnaissance. from Elite Police

    • The most familiar form of melee weapon and unarmed combat drill in the modern world is the Kata and the Hyung in Eastern martial arts. from Military parade

    • Equilibrium featured a fictional martial art called Gun Kata that combined gunfighting with hand-to-hand combat. from Christian Bale

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      Wrestling Wrestling is a combat sport involving grappling type techniques such as clinch fighting, throws and takedowns…
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      Wrestling is a combat sport involving grappling type techniques such as clinch fighting, throws and takedowns, joint locks, pins and other grappling holds. A wrestling bout is a physical competition, between two (occasionally more) competitors or sparring partners, who attempt to gain and maintain a superior position. There are a wide range of styles with…

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      Wrestling is a combat sport involving grappling type techniques such as clinch fighting, throws and takedowns, joint locks, pins and other grappling holds. A wrestling bout is a physical competition, between two (occasionally more) competitors or sparring partners, who attempt to gain and maintain a superior position. There are a wide range of styles with varying rules with both traditional historic and modern styles. Wrestling techniques have been incorporated into other martial arts as well as military hand-to-hand combat systems.
      The term wrestling is attested in late Old English, as wræstlunge (glossing palestram).

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    How Martial arts
    Connects To Wrestling

    • Techniques include use of amateur or shoot wrestling tactics in addition to hard hitting martial arts strikes and complex submission maneuvers. from Wrestling

    • Greek wrestling was a popular form of martial art, at least in Ancient Greece (about 1100 to 146 BC). from Wrestling

    • The purpose of the early UFC competitions was to identify the most effective martial art in a real fight between competitors of different fighting disciplines, including Boxing, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Sambo, Wrestling, Muay Thai, Karate, Judo, and other styles. from Ultimate Fighting Championship

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    • The guillotine choke, also known as Mae Hadaka Jime (前裸絞, "front naked choke"; compare to a rear naked choke) in judo, is a chokehold in martial arts and wrestling applied from in front of the opponent. from Guillotine choke

    • A grappling hold (commonly referred to simply as a hold; in Japanese referred to as katame-waza, , "grappling technique") is a grappling, wrestling, judo or other martial arts term for a specific grip that is applied to an opponent. from Grappling hold

    • There are many varieties within the martial arts, including boxing and wrestling. from Hand-to-hand combat

    • A sprawl is a martial arts and wrestling term for a defensive technique that is done in response to certain takedown attempts, typically double or single leg takedown attempts. from Sprawl (grappling)

    • In 1992, after graduating from Rio Grande High School Jackson founded his own martial art, Gaidojutsu, which combines rudimentary techniques from wrestling and kickboxing with basic judo locks. from Greg Jackson (MMA trainer)

    • Primarily a feature of some martial arts and wrestling, a 2007 news article reported the dangerous use of spinal locks in Australia's National Rugby League. from Spinal lock

    • The need to protect himself led Lister to wrestling and martial arts. from Dean Lister

    • Harinck began learning martial arts at the age of eight in Judo and Wrestling. from Thom Harinck

    • Côté started his martial arts training in the Canadian Army at around age of 16, where he took up boxing and subsequently added muay thai, kickboxing and wrestling to his repertoire. from Patrick Côté (fighter)

    • He had interests in boxing, wrestling and martial arts, but did not start bodybuilding until he was 24 years old, after moving to New York City. from Billy Herrington

    • The ADA recommends mouthguards be used in 29 sports: acrobatics, basketball, bicycling, boxing, equestrian, football, gymnastics, handball, ice hockey, inline skating, lacrosse, martial arts, racquetball, rugby football, shot putting, skateboarding, skiing, skydiving, soccer, softball, squash, surfing, volleyball, water polo, weightlifting and wrestling. from Mouthguard

    • A lot of the wrestlers in Japan have some degree of knowledge in many different martial arts and wrestling styles. from Puroresu

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      Silat Silat (Minangkabau: silek) is a collective word for indigenous martial arts from a geo-cultural area of Southeast…
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      Silat (Minangkabau: silek) is a collective word for indigenous martial arts from a geo-cultural area of Southeast Asia encompassing most of the Nusantara, the Malay Archipelago and the entirety of the Malay Peninsula. Originally developed in what are now Indonesia, peninsular Malaysia, south Thailand, and Singapore, it is also traditionally practiced in Brunei, Vietnam and…

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      Silat (Minangkabau: silek) is a collective word for indigenous martial arts from a geo-cultural area of Southeast Asia encompassing most of the Nusantara, the Malay Archipelago and the entirety of the Malay Peninsula. Originally developed in what are now Indonesia, peninsular Malaysia, south Thailand, and Singapore, it is also traditionally practiced in Brunei, Vietnam and the southern Philippines. There are hundreds of different styles but they tend to focus either on strikes, joint manipulation, throws, bladed weaponry, or some combination thereof. Silat is one of the sports included in the Southeast Asian Games and other region-wide competitions. Training halls are overseen by separate national organizations in each of the main countries the art is practiced. These are Ikatan Pencak Silat Indonesia (IPSI) from Indonesia, Persekutuan Silat Kebangsaan Malaysia (PESAKA) from Malaysia, Persekutuan Silat Brunei Darussalam (PERSIB) from Brunei and Persekutuan Silat Singapura (PERSISI) from Singapore. Practitioners are called pesilat.
      While the word silat is used by Malay-speakers throughout Southeast Asia, the art is more often called pencak silat in the Indonesian language. The clear distinction between Indonesian and Peninsular silat is a relatively recent one based largely on post-independence patriotic sentiments. The term silat Melayu ("Malay silat") was originally used in reference to Sumatra and the Melayu Kingdom, but is today commonly used for referring to systems created on the Southeast Asian mainland. Generally speaking, silat Melayu is characterized by fixed hand positions and today is often thought of as a slow dance-like art among non-practitioners. In Indonesia, pencak silat displays greater diversity and its use of high kicks, jumps and agile maneuvers are comparatively more well known among the public. While this generalization does not necessarily reflect the reality of silat's techniques, it has had a notable influence on the stereotypical way silat is portrayed in Malaysia and Singapore.

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    How Martial arts
    Connects To Silat

    • and continue to influence today's systems along with other traditional systems such as eskrima and silat. from Martial arts

    • Such traditions include eskrima, silat, kalaripayat, kobudo, and historical European martial arts, especially those of the German Renaissance. from Martial arts

    • Silat (Minangkabau: silek) is a collective word for indigenous martial arts from a geo-cultural area of Southeast Asia encompassing most of the Nusantara, the Malay Archipelago and the entirety of the Malay Peninsula. from Silat

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    • Martial arts and combat sports that emphasize stand-up fighting include boxing, escrima, jōdō, karate, kendo, kickboxing, kung fu, muay thai, savate, fistfighting, silat and taekwondo. from Stand-up fighting

    • Silat is an Indonesian native martial art, and Pencak Silat is an umbrella term for the indigenous martial arts created in Indonesia. from Sport in Indonesia

    • Dancers wear traditional warrior's attire, in tengkolok, red belt and black clothing, and dance to the beat of silat, a Malay martial art. from Music of Brunei

    • It is also worn as a uniform in Silat, a traditional Malay martial arts. from Baju Melayu

    • Kota Bharu, as the state capital, is a popular centre for such pursuits as silat, martial arts, and kertok drumming. from Kelantan

    • Although generally adhering to a philosophy of non-violence, Vulcans have developed martial arts and techniques of hand-to-hand combat. Vulcan martial arts are highly ritualistic and based on philosophy, similar to Human counterparts such as karate and Silat. from Vulcan (Star Trek)

    • There are several forms of Filipino martial arts that originated in the Philippines (similar to how Silat is the martial arts practiced in Asia) including Eskrima (weapon-based fighting, also known as Arnis and in the West sometimes as Kali), Panantukan (empty-handed techniques), and Pananjakman (the boxing component of Filipino martial arts). from Culture of the Philippines

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      Martial arts film Martial arts film is a film genre. A sub-genre of the action film, martial arts films contain numerous martial arts…
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      Martial arts film is a film genre. A sub-genre of the action film, martial arts films contain numerous martial arts fights between characters, usually as the films' primary appeal and entertainment value, and often as a method of storytelling and character expression and development. Martial arts are frequently featured in training scenes and other sequences in addition to fights. Martial arts films commonly include other types of action, such as stuntwork, chases, and/or gunfights.

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    How Martial arts
    Connects To Martial arts film

    • A sub-genre of the action film, martial arts films contain numerous martial arts fights between characters, usually as the films' primary appeal and entertainment value, and often as a method of storytelling and character expression and development. from Martial arts film

    • Martial arts since the 1970s has become a significant industry, a subset of the wider sport industry (including cinema and sports television). from Martial arts

    • Due in part to Asian and Hollywood martial arts movies, most modern American martial arts are either Asian-derived or Asian influenced. from Martial arts

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    • Jean-Claude Camille François Van Varenberg (born 18 October 1960), professionally known as Jean-Claude Van Damme and abbreviated as JCVD, is a Belgian martial artist, actor, and director best known for his martial arts action films. from Jean-Claude Van Damme

    • Cynthia Rothrock (born March 8, 1957) is an American martial artist and actress specializing in martial arts films. from Cynthia Rothrock

    • born in Los Angeles, California is an American martial artist and martial arts actor of direct Japanese descent. from Kane Kosugi

    • The spectacular appearance that is both graceful and powerful as from its martial arts origin has made the Butterfly kick versatile in a wide range of performing arts such as breakdancing, tricking, martial arts films, various video games (such as the Tekken series, the Mortal Kombat series and The Matrix Online), gymnastics and even on the ice as seen in Olympics figure skating. from Butterfly kick

    • Bruce Li ( ) (born Ho Chung-tao June 5, 1950) is a Taiwanese actor, martial artist and Bruce Lee imitator who starred in martial arts films from the Bruceploitation movement. from Bruce Li

    • Martial arts - A sub-genre of the action film, martial arts films contain numerous fights between characters. from Action film

    • Bruce Le (real name Huang Jian Long, a.k.a. Wong Kin Lung) is a martial artist and actor who is known for the martial arts films he made in the 1970s and '80s. from Bruce Le

    • Street Fighter: Assassin's Fist is a live-action web series, TV series and feature film in the martial arts film genre developed by director, fight choreographer, writer, actor and martial artist Joey Ansah; actor, writer and martial artist Christian Howard and Academy Award-nominated film producer, Jacqueline Quella. from Street Fighter: Assassin's Fist

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      Bartitsu Bartitsu is an eclectic martial art and self-defence method originally developed in England during the years…
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      Bartitsu is an eclectic martial art and self-defence method originally developed in England during the years 1898–1902. In 1903, it was immortalised (as "baritsu") by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, author of the Sherlock Holmes mystery stories. Although dormant throughout most of the 20th century, bartitsu has been experiencing a revival since 2002.

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    How Martial arts
    Connects To Bartitsu

    • He also founded an eclectic style named Bartitsu which combined jujutsu, judo, boxing, savate and stick fighting. from Martial arts

    • Additional footage shot in Italy and the United States illustrates the modern revival of Bartitsu as a recreational martial art. from Bartitsu

    • Bartitsu is an eclectic martial art and self-defence method originally developed in England during the years 1898–1902. from Bartitsu

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    • In the year 1900, aged twenty, Uyenishi travelled to London at the invitation of Edward William Barton-Wright, the founder of the eclectic martial art of Bartitsu. from Sadakazu Uyenishi

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      Stage combat Stage combat is a specialized technique in theatre designed to create the illusion of physical combat without…
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      Stage combat is a specialized technique in theatre designed to create the illusion of physical combat without causing harm to the performers. It is employed in live stage plays as well as operatic and ballet productions. The term is also used informally to describe Fight choreography for other production media including film and television. It is a common field of study for actors and dancers with some form of martial arts training, and is closely related to the practice of stunts.

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    How Martial arts
    Connects To Stage combat

    • By application or intent: self-defense, combat sport, choreography or demonstration of forms, physical fitness, meditation, etc. from Martial arts

    • Stage combat training includes unarmed combat skills such as illusory slaps, punches, kicks, throwing and holding techniques; theatrical adaptations of various forms of fencing such as rapier and dagger, smallsword and broadsword, as well as the use of other weapons, notably the quarterstaff and knives; and more specialized skills such as professional wrestling and different styles of martial arts. from Stage combat

    • It is a common field of study for actors and dancers with some form of martial arts training, and is closely related to the practice of stunts. from Stage combat

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    • Jackie Chan, SBS, MBE (born Chan Kong-sang, ; 7 April 1954) is a Hong Kong actor, action choreographer, comedian, director, producer, martial artist, screenwriter, entrepreneur, singer, and stunt performer. from Jackie Chan

    • Yuen Wah (born 2 September 1950) is a Hong Kong action film actor, action choreographer, stuntman and martial artist who has appeared in over 160 films and over 20 television series. from Yuen Wah

    • Staged fights in Cinema include performances of classical fencing, historical fencing, martial arts, close combat and duels in general, as well as choreography of full-scale battles. from Combat in film

    • Panna Rittikrai (Thai พันนา ฤทธิไกร) (born Krittiya Lardphanna ( ); February 17, 1961 – July 20, 2014) was a Thai martial arts action choreographer, film director, screenwriter and actor. from Panna Rittikrai

    • Frank W. Dux (pronounced "dukes") is a martial artist and fight choreographer. from Frank Dux

    • Street Fighter: Assassin's Fist is a live-action web series, TV series and feature film in the martial arts film genre developed by director, fight choreographer, writer, actor and martial artist Joey Ansah; actor, writer and martial artist Christian Howard and Academy Award-nominated film producer, Jacqueline Quella. from Street Fighter: Assassin's Fist

    • Paulo Tocha is a martial artist, actor and fight choreographer. from Paulo Tocha

    • Philip Wan-Lung Ng (traditional Chinese: 伍允龍; simplified Chinese: 伍允龙; pinyin: wŭ yŭn lóng) is an Hong Kong-born American actor, martial artist and action choreographer. from Philip Ng

    • Hung Yan-yan, also known as Xiong Xinxin, is a Hong Kong martial artist, actor, stuntman and action director originally from Liuzhou, Guangxi, China. from Hung Yan-yan

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      Jet Li Li Lianjie ([lì ljǎntɕjɛ̌]; born 26 April 1963), better known by his English stage name Jet Li, is a Chinese film…
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      Li Lianjie ([lì ljǎntɕjɛ̌]; born 26 April 1963), better known by his English stage name Jet Li, is a Chinese film actor, film producer, martial artist, and wushu champion who was born in Beijing. He is a naturalised Singaporean citizen.…

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      Li Lianjie ([lì ljǎntɕjɛ̌]; born 26 April 1963), better known by his English stage name Jet Li, is a Chinese film actor, film producer, martial artist, and wushu champion who was born in Beijing. He is a naturalised Singaporean citizen.
      After three years of intensive training with Wu Bin, Li won his first national championship for the Beijing Wushu Team. After retiring from Wushu at age 19, he went on to win great acclaim in China as an actor making his debut with the film Shaolin Temple (1982). He went on to star in many critically acclaimed martial arts epic films, most notably the Once Upon A Time in China series, in which he portrayed folk hero Wong Fei-hung.
      Li's first role in a Hollywood film was as a villain in Lethal Weapon 4 (1998), and his first leading role in a Hollywood film was as Han Sing in Romeo Must Die (2000). He has gone on to star in many Hollywood action films, including Kiss of the Dragon and Unleashed. He co-starred in The Forbidden Kingdom (2008) with Jackie Chan, all three of The Expendables films with Sylvester Stallone, and as the title character villain in The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor (2008) opposite Brendan Fraser.

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    Connects To Jet Li

    • Jackie Chan and Jet Li are prominent movie figures who have been responsible for promoting Chinese martial arts in recent years. from Martial arts

    • Bartkowiak made his directorial debut with Romeo Must Die a martial-arts action film starring Jet Li and Aaliyah, which was a huge hit at the box-office, a year later he made the action-comedy film Exit Wounds starring Steven Seagal, the film was a hit in theaters. from Andrzej Bartkowiak

    • While best known for Western and Native American themed films, Fusco recently drew on his lifelong background in martial arts to write The Forbidden Kingdom, starring Jet Li and Jackie Chan. from John Fusco

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    • Growing up Albert idolized martial arts legends Jackie Chan and Jet Li, claiming he wanted to be a "karate master" just like them. from John Albert (fighter)

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    1. 48
      Shuai jiao Shuai jiao (Chinese: 摔跤 or 摔角; pinyin: Shuāijiāo; Wade–Giles: Shuai-chiao) was the term pertains to the…
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      Shuai jiao (Chinese: 摔跤 or 摔角; pinyin: Shuāijiāo; Wade–Giles: Shuai-chiao) was the term pertains to the jacket wrestling style of Beijing, Tianjin and Baoding of Hebei Province in the North China Plain which was codified by Shan Pu Ying (善撲营 The Battalion of Excellency in Catching) of the Nei Wu Fu (内務府, Internal Administration Unit…

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      Shuai jiao (Chinese: 摔跤 or 摔角; pinyin: Shuāijiāo; Wade–Giles: Shuai-chiao) was the term pertains to the jacket wrestling style of Beijing, Tianjin and Baoding of Hebei Province in the North China Plain which was codified by Shan Pu Ying (善撲营 The Battalion of Excellency in Catching) of the Nei Wu Fu (内務府, Internal Administration Unit of Imperial Household Department). In modern usage it is also the general Mandarin Chinese term for any form of wrestling, both inside and outside of China. As a generic name, it may be used to cover various styles of wrestling practised in China in the form of a martial arts system or a sport. The art was introduced to Southern China in Republican era after 1911.

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    How Martial arts
    Connects To Shuai jiao

    • One of his main opponents was Chi You who was credited as the creator of jiao di, a forerunner to the modern art of Chinese wrestling. from Martial arts

    • As a generic name, it may be used to cover various styles of wrestling practised in China in the form of a martial arts system or a sport. from Shuai jiao

    • Martial arts expert Gemma Salter won the 2006 UK full contact fighting title and became the 2006 European champion in Chinese wrestling, shuai jiao. from Thomas Gainsborough School

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      Morihei Ueshiba Morihei Ueshiba (植芝 盛平, Ueshiba Morihei, December 14, 1883 – April 26, 1969) was a martial artist and founder of…
    1. 49

      Morihei Ueshiba (植芝 盛平, Ueshiba Morihei, December 14, 1883 – April 26, 1969) was a martial artist and founder of the Japanese martial art of aikido. He is often referred to as "the founder" Kaiso (開祖) or Ōsensei (大先生/翁先生), "Great Teacher".…

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      Morihei Ueshiba (植芝 盛平, Ueshiba Morihei, December 14, 1883 – April 26, 1969) was a martial artist and founder of the Japanese martial art of aikido. He is often referred to as "the founder" Kaiso (開祖) or Ōsensei (大先生/翁先生), "Great Teacher".
      The son of a landowner from Tanabe, Ueshiba studied a number of martial arts in his youth, and served in the Japanese Army during the Russo-Japanese War. After being discharged in 1907, he moved to Hokkaidō as the head of a pioneer settlement; here he met and studied with Takeda Sokaku, the founder of Daitō-ryū aiki-jūjutsu. On leaving Hokkaido in 1919, Ueshiba joined the Ōmoto-kyō movement, a Shinto sect, in Ayabe, where he served as a martial arts instructor and opened his first dojo. He accompanied the head of the Ōmoto-kyō group, Onisaburo Deguchi, on an expedition to Mongolia in 1924, where they were captured by Chinese troops and returned to Japan. The following year, he experienced a great spiritual enlightenment, stating that, "a golden spirit sprang up from the ground, veiled my body, and changed my body into a golden one." After this experience, his martial arts skill appeared greatly increased.
      Ueshiba moved to Tokyo in 1926, where he set up the Aikikai Hombu Dojo. In the aftermath of World War II the dojo was closed, but Ueshiba continued training at another dojo he had set up in Iwama. From the end of the war until the 1960s, he worked to promote aikido throughout Japan and abroad. He died from liver cancer in 1969.

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    How Martial arts
    Connects To Morihei Ueshiba

    • Aikido, for instance, can have a strong philosophical belief of the flow of energy and peace fostering, as idealised by its founder Morihei Ueshiba. from Martial arts

    • was a martial artist and founder of the Japanese martial art of aikido. from Morihei Ueshiba

    • Takuma Hisa (久 琢磨 Hisa Takuma, c.1895–1980-10-31) was a prominent Japanese martial artist, early student in Daito-ryu aiki-jujutsu of both Sokaku Takeda and aikido founder Morihei Ueshiba. from Takuma Hisa

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    • Noriaki Inoue (1902-12-03, Tanabe – 1994-04-13, Kunitachi) was a Japanese martial artist, who was in his early years closely associated with the spiritual and technical development of aikido along with his uncle Morihei Ueshiba. from Noriaki Inoue

    • One of the more well-known followers of Oomoto was Morihei Ueshiba, the founder of Aikido, a Japanese martial artist. from Oomoto

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      K-1 K-1 began in 1993 and is a kickboxing platform and martial arts brand well-known worldwide mainly for its…
    1. 50

      K-1 began in 1993 and is a kickboxing platform and martial arts brand well-known worldwide mainly for its heavyweight division fights. On January 2012, K-1 Global Holdings Limited, a company registered in Hong Kong, acquired the rights to K-1, and is the current organizer of K-1 events worldwide.

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    How Martial arts
    Connects To K-1

    • Nearly all mixed martial arts organizations such as UFC, Pancrase, Shooto use a form of full-contact rules, as do professional boxing organizations and K-1. from Martial arts

    • The K-1 rules of kickboxing were introduced based on 1980s Seidokaikan karate. from Martial arts

    • K-1 World Grand Prix 2009 Final was a martial arts event held by the K-1 on Saturday December 5, 2009 at the Yokohama Arena in Yokohama, Japan. from K-1 World Grand Prix 2009 Final

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