Love marriage is a term used primarily in South Asia, especially in India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka, to describe a marriage which deviates from an arranged marriage, which is considered the norm. There is no clear definition of love marriage. It is generally used to describe a marriage which was the sole decision of the couple.

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  • 1. [Inter-caste marriage] Inter-caste marriage is a term used in Asian and Middle-Eastern countries for a marriage where the couple are from two social groups, e.g., different castes, races or clans and are related to concepts of exogamy and endogamy. Normally, such marriages are strongly discouraged in society and are viewed as a threat to the existing social order.
  • 2. [Stephanie Coontz] Stephanie Coontz (born August 31, 1944) is an author, historian, and faculty member at Evergreen State College. She teaches history and family studies and is Director of Research and Public Education for the Council on Contemporary Families, which she chaired from 2001-2004. Coontz has authored and co-edited several books about the history of the family and marriage.
  • 3. [Interfaith marriage] Interfaith marriage, traditionally called mixed marriage, is marriage (either religious or civil) between partners professing different religions.
    Some religious doctrines prohibit interfaith marriage. Others traditionally oppose interfaith marriage but may allow it in limited circumstances. Several major religions have left the matter relatively unspecified and still others allow it entirely but with some requirements for ceremony and custom.
  • 4. [Forced marriage] Forced marriage is a marriage in which one or both of the parties is married without his or her consent or against his or her will. A forced marriage differs from an arranged marriage, in which both parties consent to the assistance of their parents or a third party (such as a matchmaker) in identifying
  • 5. [Arranged marriage] Arranged marriage is a type of marital union where the bride and groom are selected by a third party rather than by each other. It was common worldwide until the 18th century. In more recent times, arranged marriage is common in South Asia and China , Africa, the Middle East, Latin America, Southeast Asia and
  • 6. [National Commission for Women] The National Commission for Women (NCW) is a statutory body of the Government of India, generally concerned with advising the government on all policy matters affecting women. It was established in January 1992 under the provisions of the Indian Constitution, as defined in the 1990 National Commission for Women Act. The first head of the commission was Jayanti Patnaik. On 17 September 2014 Lalitha Kumaramangalam was appointed Chairperson.
  • 7. [Julie, or the New Heloise] Julie, or the New Heloise (French: Julie, ou la nouvelle Héloïse) is an epistolary novel by Jean-Jacques Rousseau, published in 1761 by Marc-Michel Rey in Amsterdam. The original edition was entitled Lettres de deux amans habitans d'une petite ville au pied des Alpes ("Letters from two lovers living in a small town at the foot of the Alps").
  • 8. [Honor killing] An honor killing is the homicide of a member of a family by other members, due to the perpetrators' belief that the victim has brought shame or dishonor upon the family, or has violated the principles of a community or a religion, usually for reasons such as refusing to enter an arranged marriage, being in
  • 9. [Human Rights Commission of Pakistan] The Human Rights Commission of Pakistan (Urdu: تنظیم حقوق انسانی پاکستان), or HRCP, is an independent, non-profit organisation, founded in 1987, which is not associated or affiliated with the government or any political party. It is committed to act with impartiality and objectivity in all matters. Among its main aims are spreading awareness of human
  • 10. [Héloïse d'Argenteuil] Héloïse d'Argenteuil (/ˈɛl.z/ or /ˈhɛl.z/; French: [elɔˈiz]; 1090?/1100? – 16 May 1164) was a French nun, writer, scholar, and abbess, best known for her love affair and correspondence with Peter Abélard.
  • 11. [Sectarian violence] Sectarian violence and/or sectarian strife is a form of communal violence inspired by sectarianism, that is, between different sects of one particular mode of ideology or religion within a nation/community. Religious segregation often plays a role in sectarian violence.
  • 12. [Culture of India] The culture of India is the way of living of the people of India. India's languages, religions, dance, music, architecture, food, and customs differ from place to place within the country. The Indian culture, often labeled as an amalgamation of several cultures, spans across the Indian subcontinent and has been influenced by a history that
  • 13. [Ipsos] Ipsos (French pronunciation: ​[ip.so]) is a global market research company with worldwide headquarters in Paris, France. The company was founded in 1975 and has been publicly traded on the Paris Stock Exchange since 1 July 1999. Since 1990, the Group has created or acquired numerous companies throughout the world, and as of 2012, has offices
  • 14. [Decretum Gratiani] The Decretum Gratiani, also known as the Concordia discordantium canonum or Concordantia discordantium canonum, is a collection of Canon law compiled and written in the 12th century as a legal textbook by the jurist known as Gratian. It forms the first part of the collection of six legal texts, which together became known as the
  • 15. [Caste] Caste is a form of social stratification characterized by endogamy, non-commensality and hereditary occupations. According to Human Rights Watch and UNICEF, caste discrimination affects an estimated 250 million people worldwide.
  • 16. [Peter Abelard] Peter Abelard (/ˈæb.ə.lɑrd/; Latin: Petrus Abaelardus or Abailardus; French: Pierre Abélard, pronounced: [a.be.laːʁ]; 1079 – 21 April 1142) was a medieval French scholastic philosopher, theologian and preeminent logician. He was also a composer. His affair with and love for Héloïse d'Argenteuil has become legendary. The Chambers Biographical Dictionary describes him as "the keenest thinker and boldest theologian of the 12th Century".
  • 17. [NDTV] New Delhi Television Limited (NDTV) is an Indian commercial broadcasting television network founded in 1988 by husband and wife Prannoy Roy and Radhika Roy. NDTV is an acronym for the original name of the company, New Delhi Television. Vikramaditya Chandra is the chief executive officer of the NDTV Group. KVL Narayan Rao is the Executive Vice Chairperson.
  • 18. [South Asia] South Asia or Southern Asia is a term used to represent the southern region of the Asian continent, which comprises the sub-Himalayan countries and, for some authorities, adjoining countries to the west and east. Topographically, it is dominated by the Indian Plate, which rises above sea level as northern parts of India south of the
  • 19. [Community] A community is a social unit of any size that shares common values. Although embodied or face-to-face communities are usually small, larger or more extended communities such as a national community, international community and virtual community are also studied. In human communities, intent, belief, resources, preferences, needs, risks, and a number of other conditions may be present and common, affecting the identity of the participants and their degree of cohesiveness.
  • 20. [Christian Church] The Christian Church is a term used by some to refer to the whole group of people belonging to the Christian religious tradition throughout history. In this understanding, which is generally used by Protestants, "Christian Church" does not refer to a particular Christian denomination, but to the body of all believers. Others believe the term
  • 21. [Religion] A religion is an organized collection of beliefs, cultural systems, and world views that relate humanity to an order of existence. Many religions have narratives, symbols, and sacred histories that aim to explain the meaning of life, the origin of life, or the Universe. From their beliefs about the cosmos and human nature, people may derive morality, ethics, religious laws or a preferred lifestyle.
  • 22. [Albert, Prince Consort] Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (Francis Albert Augustus Charles Emmanuel; later The Prince Consort; 26 August 1819 – 14 December 1861) was the husband of Queen Victoria.
  • 23. [Jean-Jacques Rousseau] Jean-Jacques Rousseau (/rˈs/; French: [ʒɑ̃ʒak ʁuso]; 28 June 1712 – 2 July 1778) was a Genevan philosopher, writer, and composer of the 18th century. His political philosophy influenced the Enlightenment in France and across Europe, as well as aspects of the French Revolution and the overall development of modern political and educational thought.
  • 24. [Anglo-Saxons] The Anglo-Saxons were a people who inhabited Great Britain from the 5th century. They included people from Germanic tribes who migrated to the island from continental Europe, and their descendants; as well as indigenous British groups who adopted some aspects of Anglo-Saxon culture and language. The Anglo-Saxon period denotes the period of British history between about 450 and 1066, after their initial settlement, and up until the Norman conquest.
  • 25. [Pakistan] Pakistan (/ˈpækɨstæn/ or /pɑːkiˈstɑːn/; Urdu: پاكستانALA-LC: Pākistān, pronounced [pɑːkɪst̪ɑːn]), officially the Islamic Republic of Pakistan (Urdu: اسلامی جمہوریۂ پاكستانALA-LC: Islāmī Jumhūriyah-yi Pākistān IPA: [ɪslɑːmiː d͡ʒʊmɦuːriəɪh pɑːkɪst̪ɑːn]), is a sovereign country in South Asia. With a population exceeding 191 million people, it is the sixth most populous country and with an area covering 796,095
  • 26. [Victorian era] The Victorian era of British history (and that of the British Empire) was the period of Queen Victoria's reign from 20 June 1837 until her death, on 22 January 1901. It was a long period of peace, prosperity, refined sensibilities and national self-confidence for Britain. Some scholars date the beginning of the period in terms of sensibilities and political concerns to the passage of the Reform Act 1832.
  • 27. [Sri Lanka] Sri Lanka (/srˈlɑːŋkə, -ˈlæŋkə/ or /ʃr-/; Sinhalese Śrī Laṃkāva, Tamil Ilaṅkai), officially the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka and known from the beginning of British colonial rule until 1972 as Ceylon (/sɨˈlɒnˌ s-ˌ s-/), is an island country in South Asia near south-east India.
  • 28. [Islam] Islam (/ˈɪslɑːm/; Arabic: الإسلام‎, al-ʾIslām IPA: [ælʔɪsˈlæːm]) is a monotheistic, Abrahamic religion articulated by the Qur'an, a religious text considered by its adherents to be the verbatim word of God (Allāh), and, for the vast majority of adherents, by the teachings and normative example (called the sunnah, composed of accounts called hadith) of Muhammad (
  • 29. [Queen Victoria] Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837 until her death. From 1 May 1876, she used the additional title of Empress of India.
  • 30. [India] India (/ˈɪndiə/), officially the Republic of India (Bhārat Gaṇarājya), is a country in South Asia. It is the seventh-largest country by area, the second-most populous country with over 1.2 billion people, and the most populous democracy in the world. Bounded by the Indian Ocean on the south, the Arabian Sea on the south-west, and
  • 31. [Egypt] Egypt (/ˈɪpt/; Arabic: مِصرMiṣr, Egyptian Arabic: مَصر Maṣr), officially the Arab Republic of Egypt, is a transcontinental country spanning the northeast corner of Africa and southwest corner of Asia, via a land bridge formed by the Sinai Peninsula. It is the world's only contiguous Eurafrasian nation and most of Egypt's territory of 1,010,408 square
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