Pine Brook Country Club began when Benjamin Plotkin purchased Pinewood Lake and the surrounding countryside on Mischa Hill in the historic village of Nichols, Connecticut. Plotkin built an auditorium with a revolving stage and forty rustic cabins and incorporated as the Pine Brook Country Club in 1930. Plotkin's dream was to market the rural lakeside club as a summer resort for people to stay and enjoy theatrical productions. The Club remained in existence until major fighting broke out in Europe in the mid-1940s and was reorganized as a private lake association in 1944.

FULL ARTICLE
  • 1. [Nichols, Connecticut] Nichols, a historic village in southeastern Trumbull on the Gold Coast (Connecticut) of Fairfield County, was named after the family who maintained a large farm in its center for almost 300 years. The Nichols Farms Historic District, which encompasses part of the village, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Nichols was originally
  • 2. [Johnny Johnson (musical)] Johnny Johnson is a musical with a book and lyrics by Paul Green and music by Kurt Weill.
    Based on Jaroslav Hašek's satiric novel The Good Soldier Švejk, the musical focuses on a naive and idealistic young man who, despite his pacifist views, leaves his sweetheart Minny Belle Tompkins to fight in Europe in World War
  • 3. [Cheryl Crawford] Cheryl Crawford (September 24, 1902 – October 7, 1986) was an American theatre producer and director.
    Born in Akron, Ohio, Crawford majored in drama at Smith College. Following graduation, she moved to New York City and enrolled at the Theatre Guild's school. By then she knew that she didn't want to pursue an acting career, but
  • 4. [Group Theatre (New York)] The Group Theatre was a New York City theatre collective formed in 1931 by Harold Clurman, Cheryl Crawford and Lee Strasberg. It was intended as a base for the kind of theatre they and their colleagues believed in—a forceful, naturalistic and highly disciplined artistry. They were pioneers of what would become an "American acting technique",
  • 5. [Phoebe Brand] Phoebe Brand (November 27, 1907 – July 3, 2004) was an American actress.
    Brand was born in upstate New York in 1907. She eventually moved to New York City and became an actress.
  • 6. [Pinewood Lake] Pinewood Lake is a natural lake located on the west side of 330 feet (100 m) tall Mischa Hill in the Nichols Farms Historic District section of Trumbull, Connecticut.
  • 7. [Harold Clurman] Harold Edgar Clurman (September 18, 1901 – September 9, 1980) was an American theatre director and drama critic, "one of the most influential in the United States". He was most notable as one of the three founders of the New York City's Group Theatre (1931–1941). He directed more than 40 plays in his career and,
  • 8. [Robert Lewis (director)] Robert Lewis (March 16, 1909 – November 23, 1997) was an American actor, director, teacher, author and founder of the influential Actors Studio in New York in 1947.
  • 9. [Morris Carnovsky] Morris Carnovsky (September 5, 1897 – September 1, 1992) was an American stage and film actor born in St. Louis, Missouri. He worked briefly in the Yiddish theatre before attending Washington University in St. Louis. Opting for a mainstream acting career, he appeared in dozens of Broadway shows.
  • 10. [Revolving stage] A revolving stage is a mechanically controlled platform within a theatre that can be rotated in order to speed up the changing of a scene within a show. A fully revolving set was an innovation constructed by the hydraulics engineer Tommaso Francini for an elaborately produced pageant, Le ballet de la délivrance de Renaud, which was presented for Marie de Medici in January 1617 at the Palais du Louvre and noted with admiration by contemporaries.
  • 11. [Paul Green (playwright)] Paul Eliot Green (March 17, 1894 – May 4, 1981) was an American playwright best known for his depictions of life in North Carolina during the first decades of the twentieth century. He received the Pulitzer Prize for Drama for his 1927 play, In Abraham's Bosom. It was also included in Burns Mantle's The Best Plays of 1926-1927.
  • 12. [Howard Da Silva] Howard Da Silva (May 4, 1909 – February 16, 1986) was an American actor and singer.
  • 13. [Michael Gordon (film director)] Michael Gordon (born Irving Kunin Gordon; September 6, 1909 – April 29, 1993) was an American stage actor and stage and film director.
  • 14. [Roman Bohnen] Roman Bohnen (November 24, 1901 - February 24, 1949) was an American stage and film actor.
  • 15. [Clifford Odets] Clifford Odets (July 18, 1906 – August 14, 1963) was an American playwright, screenwriter, and director. With the retirement of Eugene O'Neil from the Broadway theatre after 1934, Odets was widely seen as his successor as the leading playwright in America. Odets' socially conscious dramas were highly influential during the 1930s, when America was in
  • 16. [Will Geer] William Aughe Ghere (March 9, 1902 – April 22, 1978)—known as Will Geer—was an American actor and social activist, best known for his portrayal of Grandpa Zebulon Tyler Walton in the 1970s TV series The Waltons.
  • 17. [Irwin Shaw] Irwin Shaw (February 27, 1913 – May 16, 1984) was a prolific American playwright, screenwriter, novelist, and short-story author whose written works have sold more than 14 million copies. He is best known for his novels The Young Lions (1948) about the fate of three soldiers during World War II that was made into a
  • 18. [Ralph Steiner] Ralph Steiner (February 8, 1899 – July 13, 1986) was an American photographer, pioneer documentarian and a key figure among avant-garde filmmakers in the 1930s.
  • 19. [Canada Lee] Canada Lee (March 3, 1907 – May 9, 1952) was an American actor who pioneered roles for African Americans. A champion of civil rights in the 1930s and 1940s, he died shortly before he was scheduled to appear before the House Un-American Activities Committee. He became an actor after careers as a jockey, boxer, and musician. Lee furthered the African-American tradition in theater pioneered by such actors as Paul Robeson. Lee is the father of actor Carl Lee.
  • 20. [Frances Farmer] Frances Elena Farmer (September 19, 1913 – August 1, 1970) was an American actress and television host. She is perhaps better known for sensationalized accounts of her life, especially her involuntary commitment to a mental hospital. Farmer was the subject of two films, one television special, three books, and numerous songs and magazine articles.
  • 21. [John Garfield] John Garfield (March 4, 1913 – May 21, 1952) was an American actor adept at playing brooding, rebellious, working-class characters. He grew up in poverty in Depression-era New York City and in the early 1930s became an important member of the Group Theater. In 1937, he moved to Hollywood, eventually becoming one of Warner Bros.'
  • 22. [Lee J. Cobb] Lee J. Cobb (December 8, 1911 – February 11, 1976) was an American actor. He is best known for his performance in 12 Angry Men (1957), his Academy Award-nominated performance in On the Waterfront (1954), and one of his last films, The Exorcist (1973). He also played the role of Willy Loman in the original
  • 23. [Lee Strasberg] Lee Strasberg (born Israel Strassberg; November 17, 1901 – February 17, 1982) was an Austrian born American actor, director and acting teacher. He cofounded, with directors Harold Clurman and Cheryl Crawford, the Group Theatre in 1931, which was hailed as "America's first true theatrical collective". In 1951, he became director of the non-profit Actors Studio,
  • 24. [Sanford Meisner] Sanford Meisner (August 31, 1905 – February 2, 1997), also known as Sandy, was an American actor and acting teacher who developed an approach to acting instruction that is now known as the Meisner technique. While Meisner was exposed to Method Acting at the Group Theatre, his approach differed markedly in that he, like Konstantin
  • 25. [Luise Rainer] Luise Rainer (born January 12, 1910) is a retired German-born Austrian and American film actress. She was the first actor to win multiple Academy Awards and the first person to win them consecutively. She was discovered by American studio Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer talent scouts while acting on stage in Austria and Germany and after appearing in Austrian
  • 26. [Harry Morgan] Harry Morgan (born Harry Bratsberg, often spelled Harry Bratsburg; April 10, 1915 – December 7, 2011) was a prolific American actor and director whose television and film career spanned six decades. Morgan's major roles included Pete Porter in both December Bride (1954–1959) and Pete and Gladys (1960–1962); Officer Bill Gannon on Dragnet (1967–1970); Amos Coogan
  • 27. [Elia Kazan] Elia Kazan (born Elias Kazantzoglou, Greek: Ηλίας Καζαντζόγλου; September 7, 1909 – September 28, 2003) was a Greek-American director, producer, writer and actor, described by The New York Times as "one of the most honored and influential directors in Broadway and Hollywood history".
  • 28. [Lotte Lenya] Lotte Lenya (18 October 1898 – 27 November 1981) was an Austrian singer, diseuse, and actress, long based in the United States. In the German-speaking and classical music world she is best remembered for her performances of the songs of her husband, Kurt Weill. In English-language cinema, she was nominated for an Academy Award for
  • 29. [John Randolph (actor)] Emanuel Hirsch Cohen, better known by the stage name John Randolph, (June 1, 1915 – February 24, 2004) was an American film, television and stage actor.
  • 30. [Anna Sokolow] Anna Sokolow (February 9, 1910, Hartford, Connecticut – March 29, 2000 in New York City, New York) was an American dancer and choreographer. She was also a co-founder of the Actors Studio.
  • 31. [Paul Strand] Paul Strand (October 16, 1890 – March 31, 1976) was an American photographer and filmmaker who, along with fellow modernist photographers like Alfred Stieglitz and Edward Weston, helped establish photography as an art form in the 20th century. His diverse body of work, spanning six decades, covers numerous genres and subjects throughout the Americas, Europe, and Africa.
  • 32. [Marc Blitzstein] Marcus Samuel Blitzstein, better known as Marc Blitzstein (March 2, 1905 – January 22, 1964), was an American composer, lyricist, and librettist. He won national attention in 1937 when his pro-union musical The Cradle Will Rock, directed by Orson Welles, was shut down by the Works Progress Administration. He is known for The Cradle Will
  • 33. [Franchot Tone] Franchot Tone (February 27, 1905 – September 18, 1968) was an American stage, film, and television actor, star of Mutiny on the Bounty (1935) and many other successful films and television series throughout his career, such as Bonanza, Wagon Train, The Twilight Zone, The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, and The Lives of a Bengal Lancer. He is best known for his role as Roger Byam in Mutiny on the Bounty, starring alongside Clark Gable and Charles Laughton.
  • 34. [Betty Garrett] Betty Garrett (May 23, 1919 – February 12, 2011) was an American actress, comedienne, singer and dancer who originally performed on Broadway before being signed to a film contract with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. While there, she appeared in several musical films before returning to Broadway and making guest appearances on several television series.
  • 35. [Theatrical producer] A theatrical producer is a person who oversees all aspects of mounting a theatre production. The producer manages the overall financial and managerial functions of a production or venue, raises or provides financial backing, and hires personnel for creative positions (writer, director, designers, composer, choreographer—and in some cases, performers).
  • 36. [Imogene Coca] Imogene Coca (November 18, 1908 – June 2, 2001) was an American comic actress best known for her role opposite Sid Caesar on Your Show of Shows.
    She possessed a rubbery face capable of the broadest expressions — Life magazine compared her to Beatrice Lillie and Charlie Chaplin, and described her characterizations as taking "people or
  • 37. [Hill station] A hill station is a town located at a higher elevation than the nearby plain or valley. The term was used mostly in colonial Asia, but also in Africa (albeit rarely), for towns founded by European colonial rulers as refuges from the summer heat, up where temperatures are cooler. In the Indian context most hill stations are at an altitude of approximately 1,000 to 2,500 metres (3,500 to 7,500 feet); very few are outside this range.
  • 38. [Kurt Weill] Kurt Julian Weill (German: [vaɪl]; March 2, 1900 – April 3, 1950) was a German composer, active from the 1920s, and in his later years in the United States. He was a leading composer for the stage who was best known for his fruitful collaborations with Bertolt Brecht. With Brecht, he developed productions such as
  • 39. [Judy Holliday] Judy Holliday (June 21, 1921 – June 7, 1965) was an American actress, comedian and singer.
    She began her career as part of a nightclub act before working in Broadway plays and musicals. Her success in the 1946 stage production of Born Yesterday as "Billie Dawn" led to her being cast in the 1950 film version
  • 40. [Jerome Robbins] Jerome Robbins (October 11, 1918 – July 29, 1998), was an American theater producer, director, and dance choreographer known primarily for Broadway Theater and Ballet/Dance, but who also occasionally directed films and directed/produced for television. His work ranged from classical ballet to contemporary musical theater. Among the numerous stage productions he worked on were On
  • 41. [Theatre director] A theatre director or stage director is a director/instructor in the theatre field who oversees and orchestrates the mounting of a theatre production (a play, an opera, a musical, or a devised piece of work) by unifying various endeavours and aspects of production. The director's function is to ensure the quality and completeness of theatre
  • 42. [Carol Channing] Carol Elaine Channing (born January 31, 1921) is an American comedian, actress, singer, dancer, and voice artist, best known for originating on Broadway the musical-comedy roles of Dolly Levi in Hello, Dolly! and Lorelei Lee in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. She is the recipient of three Tony Awards (including one for lifetime achievement), a Golden Globe and an Oscar nomination.
  • 43. [Log cabin] A log cabin is a house built from logs. It is a fairly simple type of log house. A distinction should be drawn between the traditional meanings of "log cabin" and "log house." Historically most "log cabins" were a simple one- or 1½-story structures, somewhat impermanent, and less finished or less architecturally sophisticated than a
  • 44. [Bridgeport, Connecticut] Bridgeport is the most populous city in the state of Connecticut. Located in Fairfield County on the Pequonnock River and Long Island Sound, the city had an estimated population of 144,229 at the 2010 United States Census and is the core of the Greater Bridgeport area.
  • 45. [Auditorium] An auditorium is a room built to enable an audience to hear and watch performances at venues such as theatres. For movie theatres, the number of auditoriums is expressed as the number of screens.
  • 46. [Playwright] A playwright, also known as a dramatist, is a person who writes dramatic literature or drama. These works may be written specifically to be performed by actors, or they may be closet dramas - simple literary works - written using dramatic forms, but not meant for performance.
  • 47. [Actor] An actor (alternatively actress for a female; see terminology) is a person portraying a character in a dramatic or comic production; he or she performs in film, television, theatre, or radio. Actor, ὑποκριτής (hypokrites), literally means "one who interprets"; an actor, then, is one who interprets a dramatic character.Method acting is an approach in which
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