Lionel George Logue, CVO (26 February 1880 – 12 April 1953) was an Australian speech and language therapist and stage actor who successfully treated, among others, King George VI, who had a pronounced stammer.

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  • 1. [David Seidler] David Seidler (born 1937) is a British-American playwright and film and television writer. He was most successful for writing the play and the screenplay for the film The King's Speech, for which he won the Academy Award and a BAFTA for Best Original Screenplay.
  • 2. [Old Perth Technical School] The 1910 Perth Technical School building is located at 137 St Georges Terrace, Perth, Western Australia, adjacent to the Old Perth Boys School building, which had served as part of the school's former temporary premises since opening of classes there on 16 May 1900.
  • 3. [The King's Speech] The King's Speech is a 2010 British historical drama film directed by Tom Hooper and written by David Seidler. Colin Firth plays King George VI who, to cope with a stammer, sees Lionel Logue, an Australian speech and language therapist played by Geoffrey Rush. The men become friends as they work together, and after his
  • 4. [Michael Logue] Michael Logue (1840–1924) was an Irish prelate of the Roman Catholic Church. He served as Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of All Ireland from 1887 until his death in 1924. He was created a cardinal in 1893.
  • 5. [Loreto Convent, Claremont] Loreto Convent was a Catholic convent which operated as a girls' school in Claremont, Western Australia between 1901 and 1976.
  • 6. [South Australian Brewing Company] The South Australian Brewing Company was founded in 1859. There were two breweries, one in the West End of the Adelaide city centre founded by William Knox Simms (1830–1897), producing "West End" beers, and the other at Thebarton (pronounced Theb-a-ton) on the banks of the River Torrens north-west of the city centre producing "Southwark" beers
  • 7. [Claremont Teachers College] Claremont Teachers College was Western Australia’s first post-secondary teaching institution. It opened in 1902 and closed in 1981, when it became a College of Advanced Education and later a campus of Edith Cowan University. The building is on land between Goldsworthy, Princess and Bay Roads in the western Perth suburb of Claremont. It is a
  • 8. [Masonic Lodge Officers] This article relates to mainstream Craft Freemasonry, sometimes known as Blue Lodge Freemasonry. Every Masonic Lodge elects or appoints Masonic Lodge Officers to execute the necessary functions of the lodge's life and work. The precise list of such offices may vary between the jurisdictions of different Grand Lodges, although certain factors are common to all, and others are usual in most.
  • 9. [Old Parliament House, Canberra] Parliament House, known formerly as the Provisional Parliament House, was the house of the Parliament of Australia from 1927 to 1988. The building began operation on 9 May 1927 as a temporary base for the Commonwealth Parliament after its relocation from Melbourne to the new capital, Canberra, until a more permanent building could be constructed.
  • 10. [Methodist Ladies' College, Perth] The Methodist Ladies' College, Perth (MLC Perth), is an independent, Uniting Church, day and boarding school for girls, located in Claremont, a western suburb of Perth, Western Australia.
  • 11. [British Empire Exhibition] The British Empire Exhibition was a colonial exhibition held at Wembley, Middlesex in 1924 and 1925.
  • 12. [Geoffrey Rush] Geoffrey Roy Rush, AC (born 6 July 1951), is an Australian actor and film producer. He is one of the few people who have won the "Triple Crown of Acting": an Academy Award, a Tony Award and an Emmy Award. He has won one Academy Award for acting (from four nominations), three British Academy Film
  • 13. [Stuttering] Stuttering (/ˈstʌtərɪŋ/; alalia syllabaris), also known as stammering (/ˈstæmərɪŋ/; alalia literalis or anarthria literalis), is a speech disorder in which the flow of speech is disrupted by involuntary repetitions and prolongations of sounds, syllables, words or phrases as well as involuntary silent pauses or blocks in which the person who stutters is unable to produce
  • 14. [St George's Cathedral, Perth] St George's Cathedral is the principal Anglican church in the city of Perth, Western Australia and the mother-church of the Anglican Diocese of Perth. It is located in St Georges Terrace in the centre of the city.
  • 15. [Colin Firth] Colin Andrew Firth CBE (born 10 September 1960) is an English film, television, and theatre actor. His films have earned more than $3 billion from 42 releases worldwide. He has received an Academy Award, a Golden Globe, a BAFTA and three Screen Actors Guild Awards, as well as the Volpi Cup. His most notable and
  • 16. [Elder Conservatorium] The Elder Conservatorium of Music, also known as "The Con", is Australia's senior academy of music and is located in the centre of Adelaide, the capital of South Australia. It is named in honour of its benefactor, Sir Thomas Elder. Dating in its earliest form from 1883, it has a distinguished history in the intensive
  • 17. [Holy Trinity Brompton] Holy Trinity Brompton with St Paul's, Onslow Square, often referred to as HTB, is an Anglican church in Brompton, London, England. The church consists of four church buildings, HTB Brompton Road, HTB Onslow Square, HTB Queen's Gate and HTB Courtfield Gardens, as well as being the home for Worship Central, the St Paul's Theological Centre and the Alpha course. It is where the Alpha course was first developed and is one of the most influential churches in the Church of England.
  • 18. [Combat stress reaction] Combat stress reaction (CSR), is a term used within the military to describe acute behavioral disorganization seen by medical personnel as a direct result of the trauma of war. Also known as "combat fatigue", it has some overlap with the diagnosis of acute stress reaction used in civilian psychiatry. It is historically linked to shell shock and can sometimes precurse post-traumatic stress disorder.
  • 19. [Prince Alfred College] Prince Alfred College (also referred to as PAC, Princes, and in sporting circles, The Reds) is a private independent, day and boarding school for boys, located on Dequetteville Terrace, Kent Town, near the centre of Adelaide, South Australia. Prince Alfred College was established in 1869 by the Methodist Church of Australasia, which amalgamated with other Protestant churches in 1977 to form the Uniting Church in Australia.
  • 20. [Harley Street] Harley Street is a street in the City of Westminster in London which has been noted since the 19th century for its large number of private specialists in medicine and surgery.
  • 21. [Scotch College, Perth] Scotch College (informally known as Scotch or SC), is an Australian independent school for boys, situated in Swanbourne, Western Australia, Australia. The school is a member of the Public Schools Association (PSA) and is now a Uniting Church school, although it was founded in 1897 by the Presbyterian Church of Australia. The school has undertaken
  • 22. [Speech-language pathology] Speech-language pathologists (SLPs), also called speech and language therapists, or speech therapists, specialize in the evaluation and treatment of communication disorders and swallowing disorders.
  • 23. [Tongue-twister] A tongue-twister is a phrase that is designed to be difficult to articulate properly, and can be used as a type of spoken (or sung) word game. Some tongue-twisters produce results which are humorous (or humorously vulgar) when they are mispronounced, while others simply rely on the confusion and mistakes of the speaker for their amusement value.
  • 24. [George VI] George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George; 14 December 1895 – 6 February 1952) was King of the United Kingdom and the Dominions of the British Commonwealth from 11 December 1936 until his death. He was the last Emperor of India and the first Head of the Commonwealth.
  • 25. [Elocution] Elocution is the study of formal speaking in pronunciation, grammar, style, and tone.
  • 26. [Sydenham] Sydenham /ˈsɪdnəm/ is a suburban district of South East London in the London Boroughs of Lewisham, Bromley and Southwark. Sydenham was located in Kent until 1889 when the County of London was formed, additionally, in 1965 Sydenham became part of the current London Boroughs. The area was one of the first in southern England to
  • 27. [Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother] Elizabeth Angela Marguerite Bowes-Lyon (4 August 1900 – 30 March 2002) was the wife of King George VI and the mother of Queen Elizabeth II and Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowdon. She was queen consort of the United Kingdom from her husband's accession in 1936 until his death in 1952, after which she was known as Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother, to avoid confusion with her daughter, another Queen Elizabeth. She was the last Empress of India.
  • 28. [Wembley] Wembley /ˈwɛmbli/ is an area of northwest London, England, and part of the London Borough of Brent. It is home to the famous Wembley Stadium and Wembley Arena. Formerly part of the parish of Harrow on the Hill in the county of Middlesex, Wembley formed a separate civil parish from 1894 and was incorporated as a municipal borough in 1937.
  • 29. [Academy Award for Best Actor] The Academy Award for Best Actor is an award presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS). It was first awarded at the 1st Academy Awards ceremony, held in 1929; Emil Jannings received the award for his roles in The Last Command and The Way of All Flesh and it is
  • 30. [Primacy of Ireland] The Primacy of Ireland was historically disputed between the Archbishop of Armagh and the Archbishop of Dublin until finally settled by Pope Innocent VI. Primate is a title of honour denoting ceremonial precedence in the Church, and in the Middle Ages there was an intense rivalry between the two archbishoprics as to seniority. Since 1353
  • 31. [University of Adelaide] The University of Adelaide (colloquially Adelaide University or Adelaide Uni) is a public university in Adelaide, South Australia. Established in 1874, it is the third oldest university in Australia. It is associated with five Nobel laureates, 104 Rhodes scholars and is a member of the Group of Eight, as well as the sandstone universities.
  • 32. [Kalgoorlie] Kalgoorlie, now known as Kalgoorlie-Boulder after Kalgoorlie and Boulder joined, is a city in the Goldfields-Esperance region of Western Australia, Australia, and is located 595 kilometres (370 mi) east-northeast of Perth at the end of the Great Eastern Highway. The town was founded in 1893 during the Yilgarn-Goldfields gold rush, and is located close to the so-called "Golden Mile".
  • 33. [Thoracic diaphragm] In human anatomy, the thoracic diaphragm, or simply the diaphragm (Ancient Greek: διάφραγμα diáphragma “partition”), is a sheet of internal skeletal muscle that extends across the bottom of the rib cage. The diaphragm separates the thoracic cavity containing the heart and lungs, from the abdominal cavity and performs an important function in respiration: as the diaphragm contracts, the volume of the thoracic cavity increases and air is drawn into the lungs.
  • 34. [Archbishop of Armagh] The Archbishop of Armagh is an archiepiscopacy in two of the main Christian churches in Ireland. It takes its name after the city of Armagh in Northern Ireland. The ordinary also holds the title of Primate of All Ireland. Since the Reformation, parallel successions to the archiepiscopal see have taken place in the Church of Ireland and the Roman Catholic Church.
  • 35. [Academy Award for Best Picture] The Academy Award for Best Picture is one of the Academy Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to producers working in the film industry and is the only category in which every member is eligible to submit a nomination. Best Picture is considered the most important
  • 36. [Larynx] The larynx /ˈlærɪŋks/ (plural larynges, from Greek λάρυγξ, "larunks"), commonly called the voice box, is an organ in the neck of amphibians, reptiles, and mammals involved in breathing, sound production, and protecting the trachea against food aspiration. It manipulates pitch and volume. The larynx houses the vocal folds (vocal cords), which are essential for phonation. The vocal folds are situated just below where the tract of the pharynx splits into the trachea and the esophagus.
  • 37. [Canberra] Canberra (/ˈkænb(ə)rə/ or /kænˈbɛrə/) is the capital city of Australia. With a population of 381,488, it is Australia's largest inland city and the eighth-largest city overall. The city is located at the northern end of the Australian Capital Territory (ACT), 280 km (170 mi) south-west of Sydney, and 660 km (410 mi) north-east of Melbourne. A resident of Canberra is known as a "Canberran".
  • 38. [Elizabeth II] Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary; born 21 April 1926) is the constitutional monarch of 16 of the 53 member states in the Commonwealth of Nations. She is also Head of the Commonwealth and Supreme Governor of the Church of England.
  • 39. [British Empire] The British Empire comprised the dominions, colonies, protectorates, mandates and other territories ruled or administered by the United Kingdom. It originated with the overseas possessions and trading posts established by England between the late 16th and early 18th centuries. At its height, it was the largest empire in history and, for over a century, was
  • 40. [Perth] Perth /ˈpɜrθ/ is the capital and largest city of the Australian state of Western Australia. It is the fourth most populous city in Australia, with an estimated population of 1.97 million (on 30 June 2013) living in Greater Perth. Part of the South West Land Division of Western Australia, the majority of the metropolitan area
  • 41. [Adelaide] Adelaide (/ˈædəleɪd/ AD-ə-layd) is the capital city of South Australia and the fifth-largest city in Australia. As at June 2013, Adelaide had an estimated resident population of 1.29 million. The demonym "Adelaidean" is used in reference to the city and its residents. Adelaide is north of the Fleurieu Peninsula, on the Adelaide Plains between the
  • 42. [Freemasonry] Freemasonry is a fraternal organisation that traces its origins to the local fraternities of stonemasons, which from the end of the fourteenth century regulated the qualifications of masons and their interaction with authorities and clients. The degrees of freemasonry, its gradal system, retain the three grades of medieval craft guilds, those of Apprentice, journeyman or
  • 43. [Academy Awards] The Academy Awards, commonly known as The Oscars, (rebranded as The Oscars in 2013) is an annual American awards ceremony honoring cinematic achievements in the film industry. Winners are awarded the statuette, officially the Academy Award of Merit, that is much better known by its nickname Oscar. The awards, first presented in 1929 at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, are overseen by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS).
  • 44. [YMCA] The Young Men's Christian Association (commonly known as YMCA or simply the Y) is a worldwide organization with more than 57 million beneficiaries from 125 national associations. It was founded on 6 June 1844 by George Williams in London and aims to put Christian principles into practice by developing a healthy "body, mind and spirit". These three angles are reflected by the different sides of the (red) triangle – part of all YMCA logos.
  • 45. [Royal Victorian Order] The Royal Victorian Order (French: Ordre royal de Victoria) is a dynastic order of knighthood recognising distinguished personal service to the order's Sovereign, currently the reigning monarch of the Commonwealth realms, any members of their family, or any viceroy. Established in 1896, the order's chapel is the Savoy Chapel, its official day is 20 June,
  • 46. [South Australia] South Australia (abbreviated as SA) is a state in the southern central part of Australia. It covers some of the most arid parts of the continent. With a total land area of 983,482 square kilometres (379,725 sq mi), it is the fourth largest of Australia's states and territories.
  • 47. [Western Australia] Western Australia (abbreviated as WA) is a state occupying the entire western third of Australia. It is bounded by the Indian Ocean to the north and west, the Great Australian Bight and Southern Ocean to the south, the Northern Territory to the north-east and South Australia to the south-east. Western Australia is Australia's largest state
  • 48. [World War II] World War II (WWII or WW2), also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, though related conflicts began earlier. It involved the vast majority of the world's nations—including all of the great powers—eventually forming two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. It was the
  • 49. [Dublin] Dublin (/ˈdʌblɨn/; Irish: Baile Átha Cliath, pronounced [blʲaˈklʲiə]) is the capital and largest city of Ireland. Dublin is in the province of Leinster on Ireland's east coast, at the mouth of the River Liffey.
  • 50. [Actor] An actor (alternatively actress for a female; see terminology) is a person portraying a character in a dramatic or comic production; he or she performs in: film, television, theatre, or radio. Actor, ὑποκριτής (hypokrites), literally means "one who interprets"; an actor, then, is one who interprets a dramatic character.
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