Wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer

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The wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer was worn by Lady Diana Spencer at her wedding to Charles, Prince of Wales, on 29 July 1981 at St Paul's Cathedral. Diana wore an ivory silk taffeta and antique lace gown, with a 25-foot (7.62 m) train, valued then at £9000. It became one of the most famous dresses in the world, and was considered one of the most closely guarded secrets in fashion history.

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      Wedding dress of Kate Middleton English designer Sarah Burton, creative director of the luxury fashion house Alexander McQueen, designed the bridal…
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      English designer Sarah Burton, creative director of the luxury fashion house Alexander McQueen, designed the bridal gown worn by Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge (née Middleton), at her wedding to Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, on 29 April 2011.…

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      English designer Sarah Burton, creative director of the luxury fashion house Alexander McQueen, designed the bridal gown worn by Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge (née Middleton), at her wedding to Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, on 29 April 2011.
      The dress and its maker were not formally announced until the bride stepped from her car to enter Westminster Abbey just prior to the service. Noted for its design, symbolism, and expected influence on Western bridal gown trends, the dress was widely anticipated and generated much comment in the media. Replicas of the garment were produced and sold, and the original dress was on display at Buckingham Palace from 23 July 2011 until 3 October 2011 during the annual summer exhibition.

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    How Wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer
    Connects To Wedding dress of Kate Middleton

    • Comparisons were also made to the dress worn by Prince William's mother, Diana, Princess of Wales. from Wedding dress of Kate Middleton

    • David Emanuel, co-designer of the wedding dress of Diana, Princess of Wales, commented to the Canadian fashion journalist Jeanne Beker that "McQueen is owned by Gucci, an Italian company. from Wedding dress of Kate Middleton

    • In contrast, that on the wedding dress of Kate Middleton in her marriage to Prince William, Diana's eldest son, incorporated motifs cut from machine-made lace appliquéd on to silk net. from Wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer

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      Elizabeth Emanuel Elizabeth Florence Emanuel (née Weiner, born 5 July 1953) is a British fashion designer who, along with husband…
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      Elizabeth Florence Emanuel (née Weiner, born 5 July 1953) is a British fashion designer who, along with husband David Emanuel, is best known for her 1981 work for the wedding of Diana, Princess of Wales. Since then Elizabeth developed her own label, worked in costume design for airlines, cinema, pop video and television productions, as well as providing a couture service to some of the world's most famous women.

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    How Wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer
    Connects To Elizabeth Emanuel

    • The dress was designed by David and Elizabeth Emanuel and was described as a dress that "had to be something that was going to go down in history, but also something that Diana loved", and one which would be "suitably dramatic in order to make an impression". from Wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer

    • David Emanuel (born 17 November 1952) is a Welsh fashion designer who is best known for having designed (along with his then wife Elizabeth Emanuel) the wedding dress worn by Diana, Princess of Wales, in 1981. from David Emanuel (fashion designer)

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      David Emanuel (fashion designer) David Emanuel (born 17 November 1952) is a Welsh fashion designer who is best known for having designed (along with…
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      David Emanuel (born 17 November 1952) is a Welsh fashion designer who is best known for having designed (along with his then wife Elizabeth Emanuel) the wedding dress worn by Diana, Princess of Wales, in 1981.…

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      David Emanuel (born 17 November 1952) is a Welsh fashion designer who is best known for having designed (along with his then wife Elizabeth Emanuel) the wedding dress worn by Diana, Princess of Wales, in 1981.
      He participated in the British reality television show I'm a Celebrity...Get Me Out of Here! in 2013 and came runner-up to singer Kian Egan.

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    How Wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer
    Connects To David Emanuel (fashion designer)

    • David Emanuel (born 17 November 1952) is a Welsh fashion designer who is best known for having designed (along with his then wife Elizabeth Emanuel) the wedding dress worn by Diana, Princess of Wales, in 1981. from David Emanuel (fashion designer)

    • The dress was designed by David and Elizabeth Emanuel and was described as a dress that "had to be something that was going to go down in history, but also something that Diana loved", and one which would be "suitably dramatic in order to make an impression". from Wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer

    • David Emanuel, co-designer of the wedding dress of Diana, Princess of Wales, commented to the Canadian fashion journalist Jeanne Beker that "McQueen is owned by Gucci, an Italian company. from Wedding dress of Kate Middleton

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      Carrickmacross lace Carrickmacross lace is a form of lace that may be described as decorated net. A three-layer 'sandwich' is made…
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      Carrickmacross lace is a form of lace that may be described as decorated net. A three-layer 'sandwich' is made consisting of the pattern (at the bottom), covered with, first, machine-made net and then fine muslin, through which the pattern can be seen. A thick outlining thread is stitched down along the lines of the pattern,…

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      Carrickmacross lace is a form of lace that may be described as decorated net. A three-layer 'sandwich' is made consisting of the pattern (at the bottom), covered with, first, machine-made net and then fine muslin, through which the pattern can be seen. A thick outlining thread is stitched down along the lines of the pattern, sewing net and fabric together. Loops of thread known as 'twirls' are also couched along the outer edge. The excess fabric is then cut away. Some of the net is then usually decorated further with needle-run stitches or small button-holed rings known as 'pops'. Occasionally bars of buttonhole stitches are worked over fabric and net before both are cut away.
      Carrickmacross lace was introduced into Ireland in about 1820 by Mrs Grey Porter of Donaghmoyne, who taught it to local women so that they could earn some extra money. The scheme was initially of limited success, and it was only after the 1846 potato famine, when a lace school was set up by the managers of the Bath and Shirley estates at Carrickmacross as a means of helping their starving tenants, that the lace became known and found sales.

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    How Wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer
    Connects To Carrickmacross lace

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      Wedding of Charles, Prince of Wales, and Lady Diana Spencer The wedding of Charles, Prince of Wales, and Lady Diana Spencer took place on Wednesday, 29 July 1981 at St Paul's…
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      The wedding of Charles, Prince of Wales, and Lady Diana Spencer took place on Wednesday, 29 July 1981 at St Paul's Cathedral, London, United Kingdom. Their marriage was widely billed as a "fairytale wedding" and the "wedding of the century". It was watched by an estimated global TV audience of 750 million. The United Kingdom had a national holiday on that day to mark the wedding. The couple separated in 1992 and divorced in 1996.

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    How Wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer
    Connects To Wedding of Charles, Prince of Wales, and Lady Diana Spencer

    • Diana's wedding dress, valued at £9000 (£ as of ), The dress was made of silk taffeta, decorated with lace, hand embroidery, sequins, and 10,000 pearls. from Wedding of Charles, Prince of Wales, and Lady Diana Spencer

    • The wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer was worn by Lady Diana Spencer at her wedding to Charles, Prince of Wales, on 29 July 1981 at St Paul's Cathedral. Diana wore an ivory silk taffeta and antique lace gown, with a 25-foot (7.62 m) train, valued then at £9000. from Wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer

    • The white wedding style was given another significant boost in 1981, when three-quarter billion people—one out of six people around the globe—watched Charles, Prince of Wales marry Diana Spencer in her elaborate white taffeta dress with a 25-foot-long train. from White wedding

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      Train (clothing) In clothing, a train describes the long back portion of a skirt, overskirt, or dress that trails behind the wearer…
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      In clothing, a train describes the long back portion of a skirt, overskirt, or dress that trails behind the wearer. It is a common part of a woman's court dress, formal evening gowns or wedding dress. The term is also used for the highly elongated upper tail covert feathers used in display by male peafowl.…

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      In clothing, a train describes the long back portion of a skirt, overskirt, or dress that trails behind the wearer. It is a common part of a woman's court dress, formal evening gowns or wedding dress. The term is also used for the highly elongated upper tail covert feathers used in display by male peafowl.
      In the Roman Catholic Church the cappa magna (literally, "great cape"), a form of mantle, is a voluminous ecclesiastical vestment with a long train. Cardinals, bishops, and certain other honorary prelates are entitled to wear the cappa magna.

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    How Wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer
    Connects To Train (clothing)

    • The wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer was worn by Lady Diana Spencer at her wedding to Charles, Prince of Wales, on 29 July 1981 at St Paul's Cathedral. Diana wore an ivory silk taffeta and antique lace gown, with a 25-foot (7.62 m) train, valued then at £9000. from Wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer

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      Taffeta Taffeta (/ˈtæfɨtə/; archaically spelled taffety) is a crisp, smooth, plain woven fabric made from silk or…
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      Taffeta (/ˈtæfɨtə/; archaically spelled taffety) is a crisp, smooth, plain woven fabric made from silk or cuprammonium rayons. The word is Persian in origin and means "twisted woven." It is considered to be a "high-end" fabric, suitable for use in ball gowns, wedding dresses, and interiors for curtains or wallcovering. It is also widely used…

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      Taffeta (/ˈtæfɨtə/; archaically spelled taffety) is a crisp, smooth, plain woven fabric made from silk or cuprammonium rayons. The word is Persian in origin and means "twisted woven." It is considered to be a "high-end" fabric, suitable for use in ball gowns, wedding dresses, and interiors for curtains or wallcovering. It is also widely used in the manufacture of corsets and corsetry: it yields a more starched-like type of cloth that holds its shape better than many other fabrics. An extremely thin, crisp type of taffeta is called paper taffeta.
      There are two distinct types of silk taffeta: yarn-dyed and piece-dyed. Piece-dyed taffeta is often used in linings and is quite soft. Yarn-dyed taffeta is much stiffer and is often used in evening dresses. Shot silk taffeta was one of the most sought-after forms of Byzantine silk, and may have been the fabric known as purpura.

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    How Wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer
    Connects To Taffeta

    • The wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer was worn by Lady Diana Spencer at her wedding to Charles, Prince of Wales, on 29 July 1981 at St Paul's Cathedral. Diana wore an ivory silk taffeta and antique lace gown, with a 25-foot (7.62 m) train, valued then at £9000. from Wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer

    • Diana's wedding dress, valued at £9000 (£ as of ), The dress was made of silk taffeta, decorated with lace, hand embroidery, sequins, and 10,000 pearls. from Wedding of Charles, Prince of Wales, and Lady Diana Spencer

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      Sequin Sequins are disk-shaped beads used for decorative purposes. In earlier centuries, they were made from shiny metals…
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      Sequins are disk-shaped beads used for decorative purposes. In earlier centuries, they were made from shiny metals. Today, sequins are most often made from plastic. They are available in a wide variety of colors and geometrical shapes. Sequins are commonly used on clothing, jewelry, bags, shoes and lots of other accessories.…

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      Sequins are disk-shaped beads used for decorative purposes. In earlier centuries, they were made from shiny metals. Today, sequins are most often made from plastic. They are available in a wide variety of colors and geometrical shapes. Sequins are commonly used on clothing, jewelry, bags, shoes and lots of other accessories.
      Sequins are sometimes also referred to as spangles, paillettes, or diamantes. Paillettes themselves are commonly very large and flat. Sequins may be stitched flat to the fabric, so that they do not move, and are less likely to fall off; or they may be stitched at only one point, so that they dangle and move easily, to catch more light. Some sequins are made with multiple facets, to increase their reflective ability.

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    How Wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer
    Connects To Sequin

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      Antony Armstrong-Jones, 1st Earl of Snowdon Antony Charles Robert Armstrong-Jones, 1st Earl of Snowdon, GCVO RDI (born 7 March 1930) is an English photographer…
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      Antony Charles Robert Armstrong-Jones, 1st Earl of Snowdon, GCVO RDI (born 7 March 1930) is an English photographer and film maker. He was married to Princess Margaret, younger daughter of King George VI, and younger sister of Queen Elizabeth II.

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    How Wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer
    Connects To Antony Armstrong-Jones, 1st Earl of Snowdon

    • Diana Spencer had personally selected the designers to make her wedding dress as she had been fond of a chiffon blouse which they designed for her formal photo session with Lord Snowdon. from Wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer

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      Gown A gown, from medieval Latin gunna, is a usually loose outer garment from knee- to full-length worn by men and women…
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      A gown, from medieval Latin gunna, is a usually loose outer garment from knee- to full-length worn by men and women in Europe from the early Middle Ages to the 17th century, and continuing today in certain professions; later, gown was applied to any full-length woman's garment consisting of a bodice and attached skirt. A long, loosely-fitted gown called a Banyan was worn by men in the 18th century as an informal coat.…

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      A gown, from medieval Latin gunna, is a usually loose outer garment from knee- to full-length worn by men and women in Europe from the early Middle Ages to the 17th century, and continuing today in certain professions; later, gown was applied to any full-length woman's garment consisting of a bodice and attached skirt. A long, loosely-fitted gown called a Banyan was worn by men in the 18th century as an informal coat.
      The gowns worn today by academics, judges, and some clergy derive directly from the everyday garments worn by their medieval predecessors, formalized into a uniform in the course of the 16th and 17th centuries.

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    How Wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer
    Connects To Gown

    • The wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer was worn by Lady Diana Spencer at her wedding to Charles, Prince of Wales, on 29 July 1981 at St Paul's Cathedral. Diana wore an ivory silk taffeta and antique lace gown, with a 25-foot (7.62 m) train, valued then at £9000. from Wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer

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      Althorp Althorp (/ˈɔːlθɔːp/ or /ˈɔːltrəp/) is a Grade I listed stately home, estate and small civil parish in Daventry…
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      Althorp (/ˈɔːlθɔːp/ or /ˈɔːltrəp/) is a Grade I listed stately home, estate and small civil parish in Daventry District, Northamptonshire, England of about 13,000 acres (50 km2). By road it is about 6 miles (9.7 km) northwest of the county town of Northampton and about 75 miles (121 km) northwest of central London. It has…

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      Althorp (/ˈɔːlθɔːp/ or /ˈɔːltrəp/) is a Grade I listed stately home, estate and small civil parish in Daventry District, Northamptonshire, England of about 13,000 acres (50 km2). By road it is about 6 miles (9.7 km) northwest of the county town of Northampton and about 75 miles (121 km) northwest of central London. It has been held by the prominent aristocratic Spencer family for over 500 years, and has been owned by Charles Spencer, 9th Earl Spencer since 1992. It was also the home of his sister, Diana, before her marriage to Charles, Prince of Wales.
      Althorp is mentioned as a small hamlet in the Domesday Book as "Olletorp", and by 1377 it had become a village with a population of over fifty people. During the 15th century, the village seems to have diminished and in 1505 there were no longer any tenants living there. John Spencer's uncle – also named John Spencer – had become feoffee (feudal lord) of Wormleighton in Warwickshire and a tenant at Althorp in Northamptonshire in 1486, and in 1508, his nephew purchased Althorp estate with the handsome funds generated from the family's sheep-rearing business. Althorp became one of the prominent stately homes in England, and due to the Spencer family's wealth, and they amassed an extensive art collection and other valuable items. During the 18th century, it became a major cultural hub in England, and parties were regularly held, attracting many of the country's elite of the period. George John, 2nd Earl Spencer, who owned Althorp between 1783 and his death in 1834, developed one of the largest private libraries in Europe at the house, growing to over 100,000 books by the 1830s. After falling on hard times, John Spencer, 5th Earl Spencer, known as the Red Earl, eventually sold much of the enormous collection to Enriqueta Rylands in 1892, who was building the University of Manchester Library. Many of Althorp's possessions were sold off during the 20th century, and between 1975 and 1992 alone approximately 20% of the contents were auctioned.
      The original house at Althorp was a "classically beautiful" red brick Tudor building, but its appearance was radically altered when the architect Henry Holland was commissioned to make extensive changes, starting in 1788. Mathematical tiles were added to the exterior, encasing the old red brick, and four Corinthian pilasters were added to the front. The grand hall entrance to the house, Wootton Hall, was cited by Sir Nikolaus Pevsner as "the noblest Georgian room in the county". The Great Dining Room in the east wing extension of the house was added in 1877 under John Macvicar Anderson, with walls hung with faded, red damask silk. Numerous fireplaces and furnishings were brought to Althorp from Spencer House in London during the Blitz for safe keeping and still remain. The Picture Gallery stretches for 115 feet (35 m) on the first floor of the west wing, and is one of the best remaining examples of the original Tudor oak woodwork and ambiance in the mansion. It has an extensive collection of portraits, including Anthony van Dyck's War and Peace, a John de Critz portrait of James I, a Mary Beale portrait of Charles II, and many others. Some £2 million was spent on redecorating the house in the 1980s, during which time most of the religious paintings of Althorp were sold off.
      In total, the grounds of Althorp estate contain 28 listed buildings and structures, including nine planting stones. The mustard-yellow Grade II listed Stable Block, designed by architect Roger Morris with a Palladian influence, was ordered by Charles, Fifth Earl of Sutherland in the early 1730s, and the former falconry, now a Grade I listed building, was built in 1613. Gardener's House is listed as a Grade II* listed building in its own right, as are the Grade II listed West and East Lodges. The French landscape architect André Le Nôtre was commissioned to lay out the park and grounds in the 1660s, and further alterations were made during the late 18th century under Henry Holland. Following the death of Diana in August 1997, she was interred on a small island in the middle of the ornamental Round Oval lake. A Doric-style temple with Diana's name inscribed on top is situated across from the lake is a significant attraction during July and August when the house and estate are open to the public, although the exhibition centre, situated in the old stable block, closed permanently in August 2013.

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    How Wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer
    Connects To Althorp

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      Diana, Princess of Wales Diana, Princess of Wales (Diana Frances; née Spencer; 1 July 1961 – 31 August 1997), was the first wife of Charles…
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      Diana, Princess of Wales (Diana Frances; née Spencer; 1 July 1961 – 31 August 1997), was the first wife of Charles, Prince of Wales, who is the eldest child and heir apparent of Queen Elizabeth II.…

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      Diana, Princess of Wales (Diana Frances; née Spencer; 1 July 1961 – 31 August 1997), was the first wife of Charles, Prince of Wales, who is the eldest child and heir apparent of Queen Elizabeth II.
      Diana was born into an aristocratic English family with royal ancestry as The Honourable Diana Spencer. She was the fourth child of John Spencer, Viscount Althorp and his first wife, the Honourable Frances Roche, daughter of the 4th Baron Fermoy. Diana became Lady Diana Spencer when her father inherited the title of Earl Spencer in 1975. She became a public figure with the announcement of her engagement.
      Her wedding to the Prince of Wales on 29 July 1981 was held at St Paul's Cathedral and seen by a global television audience of over 750 million. While married she bore the titles Princess of Wales, Duchess of Cornwall, Duchess of Rothesay, Countess of Chester and Baroness of Renfrew. The marriage produced two sons, the princes William and Harry, who were respectively second and third in the line of succession to the British throne for the remainder of her lifetime.
      After her marriage, she undertook a variety of public engagements. She was well known for her fund-raising work for international charities and as an eminent celebrity of the late 20th century. She also received recognition for her charity work and for her support of the International Campaign to Ban Landmines. From 1989, she was the president of Great Ormond Street Hospital for children, in addition to dozens of other charities.
      Diana remained the object of worldwide media scrutiny during and after her marriage, which ended in divorce on 28 August 1996. If the Prince of Wales had ascended the throne during their marriage, Diana would have become queen consort. Media attention and public mourning were extensive following her death in a car crash in Paris on 31 August 1997.

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    How Wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer
    Connects To Diana, Princess of Wales

    • Diana wore a dress valued at £9000 with a 25-foot (8-metre) train. from Diana, Princess of Wales

    • The wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer was worn by Lady Diana Spencer at her wedding to Charles, Prince of Wales, on 29 July 1981 at St Paul's Cathedral. Diana wore an ivory silk taffeta and antique lace gown, with a 25-foot (7.62 m) train, valued then at £9000. from Wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer

    • Comparisons were also made to the dress worn by Prince William's mother, Diana, Princess of Wales. from Wedding dress of Kate Middleton

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    • David Emanuel (born 17 November 1952) is a Welsh fashion designer who is best known for having designed (along with his then wife Elizabeth Emanuel) the wedding dress worn by Diana, Princess of Wales, in 1981. from David Emanuel (fashion designer)

    • According to The Daily Telegraph, the dress came top in an online poll to find the 10 most iconic dresses of the last 50 years, beating other memorable garments such as Marilyn Monroe's white 'Seven Year Itch' halterneck and the wedding dress of Princess Diana. from Union Jack dress

    • The white wedding style was given another significant boost in 1981, when three-quarter billion people—one out of six people around the globe—watched Charles, Prince of Wales marry Diana Spencer in her elaborate white taffeta dress with a 25-foot-long train. from White wedding

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      Bulimia nervosa Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by binge eating and purging, or consuming a large amount of…
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      Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by binge eating and purging, or consuming a large amount of food in a short amount of time followed by an attempt to rid oneself of the food consumed (purging), typically by vomiting, taking a laxative, diuretic, or stimulant, and/or excessive exercise, because of an extensive concern for body weight.…

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      Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by binge eating and purging, or consuming a large amount of food in a short amount of time followed by an attempt to rid oneself of the food consumed (purging), typically by vomiting, taking a laxative, diuretic, or stimulant, and/or excessive exercise, because of an extensive concern for body weight.
      The term bulimia comes from Greek βουλιμία boulīmia, "ravenous hunger", a compound of βοῦς bous, "ox" and λιμός, līmos, "hunger"; literally, bulimia nervosa means disease of hunger affecting the nervous system. Bulimia nervosa was named and first described by the British psychiatrist Gerald Russell in 1979.
      Some individuals may tend to alternate between bulimia nervosa and anorexia nervosa. Bulimia is also commonly accompanied with fasting over an extended period of time. These dangerous, habit-forming practices occur while the sufferer is trying to keep their weight under a self-imposed threshold. It can lead to potassium loss and health deterioration, with depressive symptoms that are often severe and lead to a high risk of suicide. Bulimia nervosa is considered to be less life-threatening than anorexia; however, the occurrence of bulimia nervosa is higher. Bulimia nervosa is nine times more likely to occur in women than men. Up to 1% of women have bulimia nervosa.
      The majority of those with bulimia nervosa are at normal weight. Antidepressants, especially SSRIs, are widely used in the treatment of bulimia nervosa.
      There is a genetic component to bulimia. Twin studies estimate the heritability of syndromic bulimia to be 54–83%.
      Many individuals with bulimia nervosa also have an additional psychiatric disorder. Common comorbidities are mood disorders, anxiety, impulse control, and substance-misuse disorders. Patients with bulimia nervosa often have impulsive behaviors involving overspending and sexual behaviors as well as having family histories of alcohol and substance abuse, mood and eating disorders.
      The majority, about 80 to almost 90 percent of individuals with bulimia are women. However, males do develop the disorder and some studies suggest that the prevalence among males is higher than previously believed.
      Among women, adolescents are the most at risk. A survey of 496 adolescent girls reported that more than 12 percent experienced some form of eating disorder by the time they were 20.
      Over the years the size and weight of the average woman has increased with improved nutrition, but there has also been an increased message from the media to be thin. The media projects a thin ideal rather than a healthy ideal, and this causes women and young girls to work toward having a thin body even if it means purging.

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    How Wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer
    Connects To Bulimia nervosa

    • The making of the dress posed difficulties, given that Diana had developed bulimia and had dropped from a size 14 to a size 10 in the run-up to the wedding; even the seamstress was concerned about her weight loss and that the dress would not fit as it should. from Wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer

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      Embroidery Embroidery is the handicraft of decorating fabric or other materials with needle and thread or yarn. Embroidery may…
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      Embroidery is the handicraft of decorating fabric or other materials with needle and thread or yarn. Embroidery may also incorporate other materials such as metal strips, pearls, beads, quills, and sequins. Embroidery is most often used on caps, hats, coats, blankets, dress shirts, denim, stockings, and golf shirts. Embroidery is available with a wide variety of thread or yarn color.…

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      Embroidery is the handicraft of decorating fabric or other materials with needle and thread or yarn. Embroidery may also incorporate other materials such as metal strips, pearls, beads, quills, and sequins. Embroidery is most often used on caps, hats, coats, blankets, dress shirts, denim, stockings, and golf shirts. Embroidery is available with a wide variety of thread or yarn color.
      An interesting characteristic of embroidery is that the basic techniques or stitches on surviving examples of the earliest embroidery—chain stitch, buttonhole or blanket stitch, running stitch, satin stitch, cross stitch—remain the fundamental techniques of hand embroidery today.

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    Connects To Embroidery

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      Charles, Prince of Wales Charles, Prince of Wales (Charles Philip Arthur George; born 14 November 1948), is the eldest child and heir…
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      Charles, Prince of Wales (Charles Philip Arthur George; born 14 November 1948), is the eldest child and heir apparent of Queen Elizabeth II. Known alternatively in Scotland as Duke of Rothesay and in South West England as Duke of Cornwall, he is the longest-serving heir apparent in British history, having held the position since 1952. He is also the oldest person to be next-in-line to the throne since 1714.…

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      Charles, Prince of Wales (Charles Philip Arthur George; born 14 November 1948), is the eldest child and heir apparent of Queen Elizabeth II. Known alternatively in Scotland as Duke of Rothesay and in South West England as Duke of Cornwall, he is the longest-serving heir apparent in British history, having held the position since 1952. He is also the oldest person to be next-in-line to the throne since 1714.
      Charles was born at Buckingham Palace as the first grandchild of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth. He was educated at Cheam and Gordonstoun Schools, which his father, Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, had attended as a child, as well as the Timbertop campus of Geelong Grammar School in Victoria, Australia. After earning a bachelor of arts degree from Trinity College, Cambridge, Charles served in the Royal Navy from 1971 to 1976.
      He married Lady Diana Spencer in 1981 and they had two sons: Prince William, Duke of Cambridge (born 1982), and Prince Harry (born 1984). In 1996, the couple divorced, following well-publicised extra-marital affairs. Diana died in a car crash the following year. In 2005, Charles married Camilla Parker Bowles, who uses the title Duchess of Cornwall.
      Charles's interests encompass a range of humanitarian and social issues: he founded The Prince's Trust in 1976, sponsors The Prince's Charities, and is patron of numerous other charitable and arts organisations. Charles has long championed organic farming for which he established the Duchy Home Farm, run by the Duchy of Cornwall, which produces ingredients for the Duchy Originals brand which he founded in 1990. Charles has sought to raise world awareness of the dangers facing the natural environment, such as climate change. As an environmentalist, he has received numerous awards and recognition from environmental groups around the world. He has been outspoken on the role of architecture in society and the conservation of historic buildings. Subsequently, Charles created Poundbury, an experimental new town based on his theories, in Dorset in 1993. He has authored a number of books, including A Vision of Britain: A Personal View of Architecture in 1989 and the children's book The Old Man of Lochnagar in 1980. He has also promoted herbal and other alternative medical treatment.

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    How Wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer
    Connects To Charles, Prince of Wales

    • The wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer was worn by Lady Diana Spencer at her wedding to Charles, Prince of Wales, on 29 July 1981 at St Paul's Cathedral. Diana wore an ivory silk taffeta and antique lace gown, with a 25-foot (7.62 m) train, valued then at £9000. from Wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer

    • The white wedding style was given another significant boost in 1981, when three-quarter billion people—one out of six people around the globe—watched Charles, Prince of Wales marry Diana Spencer in her elaborate white taffeta dress with a 25-foot-long train. from White wedding

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      St Paul's Cathedral St Paul's Cathedral, London, is a Church of England cathedral, the seat of the Bishop of London and mother church…
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      St Paul's Cathedral, London, is a Church of England cathedral, the seat of the Bishop of London and mother church of the Diocese of London. It sits at the top of Ludgate Hill, the highest point in the City of London. Its dedication to Paul the Apostle dates back to the original church on this…

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      St Paul's Cathedral, London, is a Church of England cathedral, the seat of the Bishop of London and mother church of the Diocese of London. It sits at the top of Ludgate Hill, the highest point in the City of London. Its dedication to Paul the Apostle dates back to the original church on this site, founded in AD 604. The present church, dating from the late 17th century, was designed in the English Baroque style by Sir Christopher Wren. Its construction, completed within Wren's lifetime, was part of a major rebuilding programme which took place in the city after the Great Fire of London.
      The cathedral is one of the most famous and most recognisable sights of London, with its dome, framed by the spires of Wren's City churches, dominating the skyline for 300 years. At 365 feet (111 m) high, it was the tallest building in London from 1710 to 1962, and its dome is also among the highest in the world. In terms of area, St Paul's is the second largest church building in the United Kingdom after Liverpool Cathedral.
      St Paul's Cathedral occupies a significant place in the national identity of the English population. It is the central subject of much promotional material, as well as postcard images of the dome standing tall, surrounded by the smoke and fire of the Blitz. Important services held at St Paul's have included the funerals of Lord Nelson, the Duke of Wellington, Sir Winston Churchill and Margaret Thatcher; Jubilee celebrations for Queen Victoria; peace services marking the end of the First and Second World Wars; the wedding of Charles, Prince of Wales, and Lady Diana Spencer, the launch of the Festival of Britain and the thanksgiving services for the Golden Jubilee, the 80th Birthday and the Diamond Jubilee of Elizabeth II. St Paul's Cathedral is a busy working church, with hourly prayer and daily services.

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    How Wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer
    Connects To St Paul's Cathedral

    • The wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer was worn by Lady Diana Spencer at her wedding to Charles, Prince of Wales, on 29 July 1981 at St Paul's Cathedral. Diana wore an ivory silk taffeta and antique lace gown, with a 25-foot (7.62 m) train, valued then at £9000. from Wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer

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      Suffolk Suffolk /ˈsʌfək/ is an East Anglian county of historic origin. It has borders with Norfolk to the north…
    1. 17

      Suffolk /ˈsʌfək/ is an East Anglian county of historic origin. It has borders with Norfolk to the north, Cambridgeshire to the west and Essex to the south. The North Sea lies to the east. The county town is Ipswich; other important towns include Lowestoft, Bury St Edmunds and Felixstowe, one of the largest container ports in Europe.…

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      Suffolk /ˈsʌfək/ is an East Anglian county of historic origin. It has borders with Norfolk to the north, Cambridgeshire to the west and Essex to the south. The North Sea lies to the east. The county town is Ipswich; other important towns include Lowestoft, Bury St Edmunds and Felixstowe, one of the largest container ports in Europe.
      The county is low-lying with very few hills, and is largely arable land with the wetlands of the Broads in the north. The Suffolk Coast and Heaths are an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

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    How Wedding dress of Lady Diana Spencer
    Connects To Suffolk

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