At the 2010 MTV Video Music Awards, American singer Lady Gaga wore a dress made of raw beef, which was commonly referred to by the media as the meat dress. Designed by Franc Fernandez and styled by Nicola Formichetti, the dress was condemned by animal rights groups, and named by Time as the top fashion statement of 2010.

The press speculated on the originality of the meat dress idea, with comparisons made to similar images found in contemporary art and popular culture. As with her other dresses, it was archived, but went on display in 2011 at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame after being preserved by taxidermists as a type of jerky. Gaga explained following the awards ceremony that the dress was a statement about one's need to fight for what

one believes in, and highlighted her distaste for the US military's don't-ask-don't-tell policy.

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  • 1. [Franc Fernandez] Franc Fernandez is a Los Angeles, California-based Argentine artist and fashion designer. His most well-known work is the meat dress of Lady Gaga.
  • 2. [Nicola Formichetti] Nicola Formichetti (Italian pronunciation: [niˌkɔːla fɔɾmiˈketti]; born 31 May 1977) is an Italian-Japanese fashion director and fashion editor. He is most widely known as the artistic director of the Italian fashion label Diesel, and for being a frequent collaborator with singer-songwriter and performance artist Lady Gaga. He worked two years (September 2010 – April 2013) with the French fashion house Mugler as artistic director.
  • 3. [Engagement announcement dress of Catherine Middleton] During the public announcement of her engagement to Prince William of Wales, on 16 November 2010, Catherine Middleton wore a blue Issa dress to coordinate with the sapphire engagement ring given to her by Prince William. The dress sold out within 24-hours of her appearance in it, and sparked a trend in "little blue dresses".
  • 4. [Americano (song)] "Americano" is a song recorded by American recording artist Lady Gaga, taken from her second studio album, Born This Way (2011). The song was written by Lady Gaga, Fernando Garibay, Paul Blair, and Cheche Alara, while production was done by Gaga, Garibay, and DJ White Shadow. It combines mariachi, house, and techno genres with elements from Latin music. Lyrically, the song talks about same-sex marriage.
  • 5. [Perform This Way] "Perform This Way" is a song parody by American musician "Weird Al" Yankovic. It is a parody of "Born This Way" by Lady Gaga. The lyrics are told from the point of view of Gaga and describe her performance style and fashion sense. The song is the sixth single from Yankovic's 2011 album Alpocalypse, and
  • 6. [2010 MTV Video Music Awards] The 2010 MTV Video Music Awards took place on September 12, 2010 at Nokia Theatre in Los Angeles, honoring the best music videos from the previous year. Chelsea Handler hosted the event, the first woman in sixteen years—since the 1994 MTV Video Music Awards—to do so.
  • 7. [Flank steak] The flank steak is a beef steak cut from the abdominal muscles of the cow. A relatively long and flat cut, flank steak is used in a variety of dishes including London broil and as an alternative to the traditional skirt steak in fajitas. It can be grilled, pan-fried, broiled, or braised for increased tenderness.
  • 8. [Jana Sterbak] Jana Sterbak (born 19 March 1955) is a Canadian artist best known for her conceptual sculptures that are made about and in relation to the body. She is renowned for her dark and ironically feminist pieces such as I Want You to Feel the Way I Do… (The Dress) (1984–85), Vanitas: Flesh Dress for an Albino Anorectic (1987), Remote Control (1989), and others.
  • 9. [Born This Way (song)] "Born This Way" is a song by American recording artist Lady Gaga, from her second studio album of the same name. Written by Gaga and Jeppe Laursen, who produced along with Fernando Garibay and DJ White Shadow, it was developed while Gaga was on the road with The Monster Ball Tour. Inspired by the 1990s
  • 10. [Born This Way Ball] The Born This Way Ball was the third concert tour by American recording artist Lady Gaga, in support of her second studio album Born This Way (2011). The tour visited all continents, except Antarctica, and was ranked as the fifth highest-grossing tour of 2012 by Pollstar. The tour grossed $19.7 million in 2013 according to
  • 11. [Anti-fashion] Anti-fashion is an umbrella term for various styles of dress which are explicitly contrary to the fashion of the day. Anti-fashion styles may represent an attitude of indifference or may arise from political or practical goals which make fashion a secondary priority. The term is sometimes even used for styles championed by high profile designers,
  • 12. [Bad Romance] "Bad Romance" is a song by American recording artist Lady Gaga from her third extended play, The Fame Monster (2009). A collaborative effort between Gaga and RedOne, the lyrics of "Bad Romance" explore Gaga's attraction to individuals with whom romance never works, her preference for lonely relationships and the paranoia she experienced while on tour.
  • 13. [Fergus Henderson] Fergus Henderson (born 31 July 1963) is an English chef who founded St John restaurant on St John Street in London. He is often noted for his use of offal and other neglected cuts of meat as a consequence of his philosophy of nose to tail eating. Following in the footsteps of his parents, Brian
  • 14. [Linder Sterling] Linder Sterling (born 1954) is an English visual artist, performance artist and musician from Liverpool. She spent her teen years in Manchester. She also uses the single name "Linder".
  • 15. [MTV Video Music Award for Video of the Year] The MTV Video Music Award for Video of the Year is the most prestigious and final award handed out at the yearly MTV Video Music Awards. It was first awarded in 1984 and presented to the The Cars for the video "You Might Think".
  • 16. [Yesterday and Today] Yesterday and Today is the ninth Capitol Records album release by the Beatles and the eleventh overall American release. It was issued only in the United States, Canada and, in the 1970s, Japan. The album is remembered primarily for the controversy surrounding its original cover image, the "butcher cover" featuring the band dressed in white
  • 17. [Poker Face (Lady Gaga song)] "Poker Face" is a song by American singer Lady Gaga from her debut album, The Fame (2008). Produced by RedOne, it was released as the album's second single in late 2008 for some markets and in early 2009 for the rest of the world. "Poker Face" is an uptempo synthpop song in the key of
  • 18. [53rd Annual Grammy Awards] The 53rd Annual Grammy Awards were held on February 13, 2011, at the Staples Center in Los Angeles. They were broadcast on CBS with a rating of 26.6 million viewers. Barbra Streisand was honored as the MusiCares Person of the Year two nights prior to the telecast on February 11. Nominations were announced on December
  • 19. [University of Cumbria] The University of Cumbria (UoC) is a university in Cumbria. Its headquarters are in Carlisle. Other major campuses are at Lancaster, Ambleside, Barrow-in-Furness, Penrith and London. It was established in 2007, following the merger of St Martin's College, the Cumbria Institute of the Arts and the Cumbrian campuses of the University of Central Lancashire. Its
  • 20. [Diller Scofidio + Renfro] Diller Scofidio + Renfro is an interdisciplinary design studio that integrates architecture, the visual arts, and the performing arts. Based in New York City, Diller Scofidio + Renfro is led by three partners – Elizabeth Diller, Ricardo Scofidio, and Charles Renfro – who work with a staff of architects, artists, and administrators.
  • 21. [Alexander McQueen] Lee Alexander McQueen, CBE (17 March 1969 – 11 February 2010) was a British fashion designer and couturier. He is known for having worked as chief designer at Givenchy from 1996 to 2001 and for founding his own Alexander McQueen label. His achievements in fashion earned him four British Designer of the Year awards (1996, 1997, 2001 and 2003), as well as the CFDA's International Designer of the Year award in 2003.
  • 22. [The Undertones] The Undertones are a punk rock/new wave band formed in Derry, Northern Ireland, in 1975. From 1975 to 1983, the Undertones consisted of Feargal Sharkey (vocals), John O'Neill (rhythm guitar, vocals), Damian O'Neill (lead guitar, vocals), Michael Bradley (bass, vocals) and Billy Doherty (drums). Although much of the earlier Undertones material drew influence from punk
  • 23. [Lady Gaga] Stefani Joanne Angelina Germanotta (/ˈstɛfəniː dʒɜrməˈnɒtə/ STE-fə-nee jur-mə-NOT; born March 28, 1986), better known by her stage name Lady Gaga, is an American singer, songwriter, and actress. Born and raised in Manhattan, Gaga initially performed in theater, appearing in high school plays and studied at CAP21 through New York University's Tisch School of the Arts
  • 24. [Bikini] A bikini is generally a two-piece swimsuit that comprises panties-style bottoms that cover at least a female's crotch and a bra-style top that covers at least her breasts, but which leaves her midriff exposed, and usually the navel and waist. The size of a bikini bottom can range from full pelvic coverage to a revealing thong or g-string design.
  • 25. [Don't ask, don't tell] "Don't ask, don't tell" (DADT) was the official United States policy on service by gays and lesbians in the military instituted by the Clinton Administration in February 28, 1994, when Department of Defense Directive 1304.26 issued on December 21, 1993, took effect, lasting until September 20, 2011. The policy prohibited military personnel from discriminating against
  • 26. [Jerky] Jerky is lean meat that has been trimmed of fat, cut into strips, and then dried to prevent spoilage. Normally, this drying includes the addition of salt, to prevent bacteria from developing on the meat before sufficient moisture has been removed. The word "jerky" derived from the Quechua word ch'arki which means "dried, salted meat". All that is needed to produce basic "jerky" is a low-temperature drying method, and salt to inhibit bacterial growth.
  • 27. [Francis Bacon (artist)] Francis Bacon (28 October 1909 – 28 April 1992) was an Irish-born British figurative painter known for his bold, graphic and emotionally raw imagery. His painterly but abstracted figures typically appear isolated in glass or steel geometrical cages, set against flat, nondescript backgrounds. Bacon began painting during his early 20s and worked only sporadically until
  • 28. [Giorgio Armani] Giorgio Armani (pronounced [ˈdʒordʒo arˈmaːni]; born 11 July 1934) is an Italian fashion designer, particularly noted for his menswear. He is known today for his clean, tailored lines. He formed his company, Armani, in 1975, and by 2001 was acclaimed as the most successful designer to come out of Italy, with an annual turnover of $1.6 billion and a personal fortune of $8.5 billion as of 2013.
  • 29. [Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge] Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge (Catherine Elizabeth "Kate"; née Middleton; born 9 January 1982), is the wife of Prince William, Duke of Cambridge. Following his father Charles, Prince of Wales, William is second in line to succeed his grandmother, Queen Elizabeth II, as monarch of the United Kingdom and 15 other Commonwealth realms.
  • 30. [Ellen DeGeneres] Ellen Lee DeGeneres (/dɨˈdʒɛnərəs/; born January 26, 1958) is an American comedienne, television host, actress, writer, and television producer. She was the star in the popular sitcom Ellen from 1994 to 1998, and has hosted her syndicated talk show The Ellen DeGeneres Show since 2003.
  • 31. ["Weird Al" Yankovic] Alfred Matthew "Weird Al" Yankovic (born October 23, 1959) is an American singer-songwriter, musician, parodist, record producer, satirist, music video director, film producer, actor, and author. Yankovic is known for his humorous songs that make light of popular culture and often parody specific songs by contemporary musical acts. Since his first-aired comedy song in 1976,
  • 32. [Vogue (magazine)] Vogue is a globally recognized fashion and lifestyle magazine that is published monthly in 23 different national and regional editions by Condé Nast.
  • 33. [Beef] Beef is the culinary name for meat from bovines, especially cattle. Beef can be harvested from cows, bulls, heifers or steers. Acceptability as a food source varies in different parts of the world.
  • 34. [Taxidermy] Taxidermy (from the Greek for arrangement of skin) is the art of preparing, stuffing, and mounting the skins of animals (especially vertebrates) for display (e.g., as hunting trophies) or for other sources of study. Taxidermy can be done on all vertebrate species of animals, including mammals, birds, fish, reptiles, and amphibians.
  • 35. [Veganism] Veganism /ˈviːɡənɪzəm/ is the practice of abstaining from the use of animal products, particularly in diet, as well as following an associated philosophy that rejects the commodity status of sentient animals. A follower of veganism is known as a vegan.
  • 36. [Butcher] A butcher is a person who may slaughter animals, dress their flesh, sell their meat or do any combination of these three tasks. They may prepare standard cuts of meat, poultry, fish, and shellfish for sale in retail or wholesale food establishments. A butcher may be employed by supermarkets, grocery stores, butcher shops and fish markets, slaughter house, or may be self-employed.
  • 37. [Formaldehyde] Formaldehyde is an organic compound with the formula CH2O or HCHO. It is the simplest aldehyde and is also known by its systematic name methanal. The common name of this substance comes from its similarity and relation to formic acid.
  • 38. [Morrissey] Steven Patrick Morrissey (born 22 May 1959), commonly known by his last name, Morrissey, is an English singer and lyricist. He rose to prominence in the 1980s as the lyricist and vocalist of the band the Smiths. The band was highly successful in the United Kingdom but broke up in 1987, and Morrissey began a
  • 39. [Rock and Roll Hall of Fame] The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum is a museum located on the shore of Lake Erie in downtown Cleveland, Ohio, United States. It is dedicated to archiving the history of some of the best-known and most influential artists, producers, engineers and others who have, in some major way, influenced the music industry. The museum is part of the city's redeveloped North Coast Harbor.
  • 40. [The Daily Telegraph] The Daily Telegraph is a daily morning broadsheet newspaper, published in London and distributed throughout the United Kingdom and internationally. The newspaper was founded by Arthur B. Sleigh in June 1855 as The Daily Telegraph and Courier, and since 2004 has been owned by David and Frederick Barclay. It had a daily circulation of 523,048 in March 2014, down from 552,065 in early 2013. In comparison, The Times had an average daily circulation of 400,060, down to 394,448.
  • 41. [Halloween] Halloween or Hallowe'en (/ˌhæləˈwiːn, -oʊˈiːn, ˌhɑːl-/; a contraction of "All Hallows' Evening"), also known as Allhalloween, All Hallows' Eve, or All Saints' Eve, is a yearly celebration observed in a number of countries on 31 October, the eve of the Western Christian feast of All Hallows' Day. It initiates the triduum of Allhallowtide, the time
  • 42. [Feminism] Feminism is a collection of movements and ideologies aimed at defining, establishing, and defending equal political, economic, cultural, and social rights for women. This includes seeking to establish equal opportunities for women in education and employment. A feminist advocates or supports the rights and equality of women.
  • 43. [The Beatles] The Beatles were an English rock band that formed in Liverpool, in 1960. With John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr, they became widely regarded as the greatest and most influential act of the rock era. Rooted in skiffle, beat and 1950s rock and roll, the Beatles later experimented with several genres, ranging
  • 44. [BBC News] BBC News is an operational business division of the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) responsible for the gathering and broadcasting of news and current affairs. The department is the world's largest broadcast news organisation and generates about 120 hours of radio and television output each day, as well as online news coverage. The service maintains 45
  • 45. [Time (magazine)] Time (often written in all-caps as TIME) is an American weekly news magazine published in New York City. It was founded in 1923 and for decades dominated by Henry Luce, who built a highly profitable stable of magazines. A European edition (Time Europe, formerly known as Time Atlantic) is published in London and also covers
  • 46. [Pop music] Pop music (a term that originally derives from an abbreviation of "popular") is a genre of popular music which originated in its modern form in the 1950s, deriving from rock and roll. The terms "popular music" and "pop music" are often used interchangeably, even though the former is a description of music which is popular (and can include any style).
  • 47. [The New York Times] The New York Times (NYT) is an American daily newspaper, founded and continuously published in New York City since September 18, 1851. It has won 112 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other news organization.
  • 48. [New York] New York is a state in the Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States. New York is the 27th-most extensive, the third-most populous, and the seventh-most densely populated of the 50 United States. New York is bordered by New Jersey and Pennsylvania to the south and by Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Vermont to the east.
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