A wedding is a ceremony where people are united in marriage. Wedding traditions and customs vary greatly between cultures, ethnic groups, religions, countries, and social classes. Most wedding ceremonies involve an exchange of wedding vows by the couple, presentation of a gift (offering, ring(s), symbolic item, flowers, money), and a public proclamation of marriage by an authority figure or leader. Special wedding garments are often worn, and the ceremony is sometimes followed by a wedding reception. Music, poetry, prayers or readings from religious texts or literature are also commonly incorporated into the ceremony.

FULL ARTICLE
  • 1. [Bride] A bride is a woman about to be married or newlywed. In Western culture, a bride may be attended by one or more bridesmaids.
  • 2. [Bridegroom] A bridegroom (sometimes shortened to groom) is a man who will soon or has recently been married. A bridegroom is typically attended by a best man and groomsmen.
  • 3. [Wedding reception] A wedding reception is a party held after the completion of a marriage ceremony. It is held as hospitality for those who have attended the wedding, hence the name reception: the couple receives society, in the form of family and friends, for the first time as a married couple. Hosts provide their choice of food
  • 4. [Bridesmaid] The bridesmaids are members of the bride's party in a wedding. A bridesmaid is typically a young woman, and often a close friend or sister. She attends to the bride on the day of a wedding or marriage ceremony. Traditionally, bridesmaids were chosen from unwed young women of marriageable age.
  • 5. [Wedding dress] A wedding dress or wedding gown is the clothing worn by a bride during a wedding ceremony. Color, style and ceremonial importance of the gown can depend on the religion and culture of the wedding participants. In Western cultures, brides often choose a white wedding dress, which was made popular by Queen Victoria in the 19th century. In eastern cultures, brides often choose red to symbolize auspiciousness.
  • 6. [Engagement] An engagement or betrothal is a promise to wed, and also the period of time between a marriage proposal and a marriage—which may be lengthy or trivial. During this period, a couple is said to be betrothed, affianced, engaged to be married, or simply engaged. Future brides and grooms may be called the betrothed, a
  • 7. [Wedding cake] A wedding cake is the traditional cake served at wedding receptions following dinner. In some parts of England, the wedding cake is served at a wedding breakfast, on the morning following the ceremony. In modern Western culture, the cake is usually on display and served to guests at the reception. Traditionally, wedding cakes were made
  • 8. [Wedding vow renewal ceremony] A wedding vow renewal ceremony is a ceremony in which a married couple renew or reaffirm their wedding vows. The ceremonies have been popular in Italy for decades, and have existed in United States since the 1950s, but only became popular there after the 1970s. Most take place in churches and are seen as a
  • 9. [Marriage officiant] A marriage officiant is a person who officiates at a wedding ceremony.
  • 10. [Wedding invitation] A wedding invitation is a letter asking the recipient to attend a wedding. It is typically written in formal, third-person language and mailed five to eight weeks before the wedding date.
  • 11. [First dance] The first dance is an element in a number of traditions, being an opening of a certain dance function: ball, prom, wedding, etc.
  • 12. [Marriage vows] Marriage vows are promises each partner in a couple makes to the other during a wedding ceremony.
  • 13. [Formal wear] Formal wear (US, Canada) and formal dress (UK) are general terms for clothing suitable for formal social events, such as a wedding, formal garden party or dinner, débutante cotillion, dance, or race. The Western style of formal evening dress, characterized by black and white garments, has spread through many countries; it is almost always the standard formal social dress in countries without a formal national costume.
  • 14. [Jewish wedding] A Jewish wedding is a wedding ceremony that follows Jewish law and traditions.
    While wedding ceremonies vary, common features of a Jewish wedding include a ketubah (marriage contract) which is signed by two witnesses, a wedding canopy (chuppah or huppah), a ring owned by the groom that is given to the bride under the canopy, and the breaking of a glass.
  • 15. [Las arras] Las arras, or Las arras matrimoniales (English: arrhae, wedding tokens, or unity coins) are wedding paraphernalia used in Christian wedding ceremonies in Spain, Latin American countries, and the Philippines. The tradition is also followed, with varying names and customs, in countries and communities bearing degrees of Hispanic influence. Traditionally, in Spain and Latin America, it
  • 16. [White wedding] A white wedding is a traditional formal or semi-formal wedding originating in Britain.
    The term originates from the white colour of the wedding dress, which first became popular with Victorian era elites after Queen Victoria wore a white lace dress at her wedding. However, the term now also encapsulates the entire Western wedding routine, especially in the Christian religious tradition, which generally includes a ceremony during which the marriage begins, followed by a reception.
  • 17. [Wedding breakfast] A wedding breakfast is a dinner given to the bride, bridegroom, and guests at the wedding reception that follows a wedding in the United Kingdom, Germany, Austria, Scandinavia and some English-speaking countries. The Compact Oxford Dictionary lists the phrase as only “British”, and the Merriam-Webster online dictionary does not list it at all. Wedding breakfast
  • 18. [Wedding music] Wedding music applies to music played at wedding celebrations, including the ceremony and any festivities before or after the event. The music can be performed live by instrumentalists and/or vocalists or may use pre-recorded songs, depending on the format of the event, traditions associated with the prevailing culture and the wishes of the couple being married.
  • 19. [Flower girl] The phrase flower girl can have various meanings. In broadest terms it is a girl associated with flowers. It has been used to refer to girls who sell flowers, such as the fictional character Eliza Doolittle, or to girls who have flower-related powers or themes, such as Lun Lun the Flower Girl, or the alter-ego of "Flower Seller Uniqua" (which is "Flower Girl") in Backyardigans.
  • 20. [Page boy] A page boy is a young male attendant at a wedding or cotillion . This type of wedding attendant is less common than it used to be, but is still a way of including young relatives or the children of relatives and friends in a wedding. A page is often seen at British royal weddings. There may be many pages for effect at cotillions.
  • 21. [Poffer] The poffer, toer (Limberg dialect) or North Brabantian hat is a traditional female folk headdress of North Brabant, most famous of the Meierij of 's-Hertogenbosch and of northern Limburg, Netherlands. The poffer was worn only by married women. It was fashionable between the 1860s and the 1920s. In contrast to Zeeland and the more northern
  • 22. [Morning dress] Morning dress is the daytime formal dress code, consisting chiefly for men of a morning coat, waistcoat, and striped trousers, and an appropriate dress for women. Men may also wear a popular variant where all parts (morning coat, waistcoat and trousers) are the same colour/material, often grey and usually called 'Morning Grey' to distinguish it; this is only properly appropriate to weddings and races, and is known as a morning suit. The semi-formal counterpart of this code is the Stroller.
  • 23. [Dashiki] The dashiki is a colorful men's garment widely worn in West Africa that covers the top half of the body. It has formal and informal versions and varies from simple draped clothing to fully tailored suits. A common form is a loose-fitting pullover garment, with an ornate V-shaped collar, and tailored and embroidered neck and sleeve lines.
  • 24. [Wedding planner] A wedding planner is a professional who assists with the design, planning and management of a client's wedding. Weddings are significant events in people's lives and as such, couples are often willing to spend considerable amount of money to ensure that their weddings are well-organized. Wedding planners are often used by couples who work long hours and have little spare time available for sourcing and managing wedding venues and wedding suppliers.
  • 25. [Ceremony] A ceremony is an event of ritual significance, performed on a special occasion. The word may be of Etruscan origin, via the Latin caerimonia.
  • 26. [Collective wedding] A collective wedding or mass wedding is a marriage ceremony in which several couples are married at the same time.

  • 27. [Bridal Chorus] The "Bridal Chorus" ("Treulich geführt" in German), from the 1850 opera Lohengrin, by German composer Richard Wagner, is a march played for the bride's entrance at many formal weddings throughout the Western world. In English-speaking countries it is generally known as "Here Comes the Bride" or "Wedding March," though, actually, "wedding march" refers to any
  • 28. [Groomsman] In North America, a groomsman is one of the male attendants to the groom in a wedding ceremony. In Britain, a similar role is performed by an "usher". Usually, the groom selects close friends and relatives to serve as groomsmen, and it is considered an honor to be selected. From his groomsmen, the groom usually chooses one to serve as best man.
  • 29. [Elopement (marriage)] To elope, most literally, merely means to run away and to not come back to the point of origination. More specifically, elopement is often used to refer to a marriage conducted in sudden and secretive fashion, usually involving hurried flight away from one's place of residence together with one's beloved with the intention of getting married.
  • 30. [Wedding videography] Wedding videography is a video production that documents a wedding on video. The final product of the videographer's documentation is commonly called a wedding video. It is also referred to as a wedding movie or a wedding film.
  • 31. [Bridesman] In contemporary western culture a bridesman is a male friend of the bride, one who walks down the aisle in the bridal ceremony in the traditional place of a bridesmaid.
  • 32. [Wedding ring] A wedding ring or wedding band is a ring, often but not always made of metal, indicating the wearer is married. Depending on the local culture, it is worn on the base of the right or the left ring finger. The custom of wearing such a ring has spread widely beyond its origin in Europe.
  • 33. [Ritual] A ritual "is a sequence of activities involving gestures, words, and objects, performed in a sequestered place, and performed according to set sequence." Rituals may be prescribed by the traditions of a community, including a religious community. Rituals are characterized by formalism, traditionalism, invariance, rule-governance, sacral symbolism and performance.
  • 34. [Shotgun wedding] A shotgun wedding is a wedding that is arranged to avoid embarrassment due to an unplanned pregnancy, rather than out of the desire of the participants. The phrase is an American colloquialism, though it is also used in other parts of the world, based on a supposed scenario (usually hyperbole) that the father of the
  • 35. [Chuppah] A chuppah (Hebrew: חוּפָּה‎, pl. חוּפּוֹת, chuppot, literally, "canopy" or "covering"), also huppah, chipe, chupah, or chuppa, is a canopy under which a Jewish couple stand during their Jewish wedding ceremony. It consists of a cloth or sheet, sometimes a tallit, stretched or supported over four poles, or sometimes manually held up by attendants to
  • 36. [Recessional hymn] A recessional hymn is a hymn placed at the end of a church service to close it. It is used commonly in the Catholic Church and Anglican Church, an equivalent to the concluding voluntary, which is called a Recessional Voluntary, for example a Wedding Recessional.
  • 37. [Saber arch] A Saber Arch is a wedding tradition in which sabers or swords are used to salute a newly married couple. The bride and groom pass under an honorary arch of sabers, typically when exiting the building in which the wedding ceremony took place. The tradition is in use worldwide.
  • 38. [Wedding March (Mendelssohn)] Felix Mendelssohn's "Wedding March" in C major, written in 1842, is one of the best known of the pieces from his suite of incidental music (Op. 61) to Shakespeare's play A Midsummer Night's Dream. It is one of the most frequently used wedding marches, generally being played on a church pipe organ.
  • 39. [Symphony for Organ No. 5 (Widor)] The Symphony for Organ No. 5 in F minor, Op. 42, No. 1, was composed by Charles-Marie Widor in 1879. It lasts for about thirty-five minutes.
  • 40. [Forced marriage] Forced marriage is a marriage in which one or both of the parties is married without his or her consent or against his or her will. A forced marriage differs from an arranged marriage, in which both parties consent to the assistance of their parents or a third party (such as a matchmaker) in identifying
  • 41. [Carnival in the Netherlands] Carnival (Dutch: Carnaval; also called "vastenavond" - eve of the fasting or Limburgish: "vastelaovend") is originally a European Pagan spring festival, with an emphasis on role-reversal and suspension of social norms. The feast became assimilated by the christian catholic church and was celebrated in the three days preceding ash wednesday and lent.
  • 42. [Buddhist view of marriage] The Buddhist view of marriage considers marriage a secular affair and as such, it is not considered a sacrament. Buddhists are expected to follow the civil laws regarding marriage laid out by their respective governments.
  • 43. [Wedding photography] Wedding photography is the photography of activities relating to weddings. It encompasses photographs of the couple before marriage (for announcements, portrait displays, or thank you cards) as well as coverage of the wedding and reception (sometimes referred to as the wedding breakfast in non-US countries). It is a major commercial endeavor that supports the bulk of the efforts for many photography studios or independent photographers.
  • 44. [Humanist officiant] A Humanist officiant (or Humanist celebrant) is a person who performs secular humanist celebrancy services for weddings, funerals, child namings, coming of age ceremonies, and other rituals. Some Humanist officiants are ordained or accredited members of the Ontario Humanist Society (OHS), Humanist Association of Canada (HAC), the American Humanist Association (AHA), the British Humanist Association
  • 45. [Processional hymn] A processional hymn is a chant, hymn or other music sung during the Procession, usually at the start of a Christian service although occasionally during the service itself. The procession usually contains members of the clergy and the choir walking behind the processional cross. Occasionally, a service will also contain a recessional hymn, although in the Protestant tradition this is usually an organ voluntary.
  • 46. [Something old] "Something old" is the first line of a traditional rhyme which details what a bride should wear at her wedding for good luck:
    It is often recited as the four "somethings", not including the sixpence. The rhyme appears to originate in England, an 1898 compilation of English folklore reciting that:
  • 47. [Wedding anniversary] A wedding anniversary is the anniversary of the date a wedding took place. Traditional names exist for some of them: for instance, 50 years of marriage is called a "golden wedding anniversary" or simply a "golden anniversary" or "golden wedding".
  • 48. [Sacred mysteries] The term sacred mysteries generally denotes the area of supernatural phenomena associated with a divinity or a religious ideology. The term has two senses, which often overlap:
  • 49. [Veil] A veil is an article of clothing or cloth hanging that is intended to cover some part of the head or face, or an object of some significance. It is especially associated with women and sacred objects.
  • 50. [Prince of Denmark's March] The Prince of Denmark's March (Danish: Prins Jørgens March), commonly called the Trumpet Voluntary, is a musical composition (a march) written circa. 1700, by English baroque composer Jeremiah Clarke (who was the first organist of the then newly rebuilt St Paul's Cathedral).
Mediander uses proprietary software that curates millions of interconnected topics to produce the MedianderConnects search results. As with any algorithmic search, anomalous results may occur. If you notice such an anomaly, or have any comments or suggestions, please contact us.