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Ballroom dance is a set of partner dances, which are enjoyed both socially and competitively around the world, and growing all the more popular in North America. Because of its performance and entertainment aspects, ballroom dance is also widely enjoyed on stage, film, and television.

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Ballroom dance may refer, at its widest definition, to almost any type of partner dancing as recreation. However, with the emergence of dancesport in modern times, the term has become narrower in scope, and traditionally refers to the five International Standard and five International Latin style dances (see dance categories below). The two styles, while differing in technique, rhythm and costumes, exemplify core elements of ballroom dancing such as control and cohesiveness. Developed in England,…

…the two styles are now regulated by the World Dance Council (WDC). In the United States, two additional variations are popular: American Smooth and American Rhythm, which combine elements of both traditional Latin and Ballroom dances.
There are also a number of historical dances, and local or national dances, which may be danced in ballrooms or salons. Sequence dancing, in pairs or other formations, is still a popular style of ballroom dance.

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      Dancesport Dancesport denotes competitive ballroom dancing, as contrasted to social or exhibition dancing. In the case of…
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      Dancesport denotes competitive ballroom dancing, as contrasted to social or exhibition dancing. In the case of wheelchair dancesport at least one of the dancers is in a wheelchair.…

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      Dancesport denotes competitive ballroom dancing, as contrasted to social or exhibition dancing. In the case of wheelchair dancesport at least one of the dancers is in a wheelchair.
      Dancesport events are sanctioned and regulated by dancesport organizations at the national and international level, such as the World DanceSport Federation.
      The name was invented to help competitive ballroom dancing gain Olympic recognition. The physical demands of dancesport has been the subject of scientific research.

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    How Ballroom dance
    Connects To Dancesport

    • Competitions, sometimes referred to as Dancesport, range from world championships, regulated by the World Dance Council (WDC), to less advanced dancers at various proficiency levels. from Ballroom dance

    • However, with the emergence of dancesport in modern times, the term has become narrower in scope. from Ballroom dance

    • Dancesport denotes competitive ballroom dancing, as contrasted to social or exhibition dancing. from Dancesport

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    • While it is mostly social dance, its ballroom form may be competitive dance, as in DanceSport. from Outline of dance

    • Its main concern is dancesport (competitive Ballroom & Latin American dancing), but it is increasingly assisting those who compete in other dance styles, with plans to host the inaugural British Universities Dance Competition (BUDC) for dancers who compete in other dance styles. from Inter Varsity Dance Association

    • The Champion Ballroom Academy (founded April 1990) is a dance studio in San Diego, California. The studio's main specialties are social partner-dancing, competitive ballroom dance (aka. Dancesport) and the Latin-dance-based aerobic program called Core Rhythms © . from Champion Ballroom Academy

    • Today, lindy hop competitions vary in form and intent, from lindy hop categories in ballroom dancing and dancesport competition, to 'national' events run by particular schools or dancing associations, to competitions held as part of a camp or exchange weekend, to small and informal competitions in local communities. from Lindy hop today

    • Dancesport, which is focused exclusively on ballroom and latin dance. from Dance

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      Glossary of partner dance terms This is a list of dance terms that are not names of dances or types of dances. See List of dances and List of dance…
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      This is a list of dance terms that are not names of dances or types of dances. See List of dances and List of dance style categories for those.
      This glossary lists terms used in various types of partner dances, leaving out terms of highly evolved or specialized dance forms, such as ballet, tap dancing, and square dancing, which have their own elaborate terminology. See also:

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    How Ballroom dance
    Connects To Glossary of partner dance terms

    • Ballroom/Smooth dances are normally danced to Western music (often from the mid-twentieth century), and couples dance counter-clockwise around a rectangular floor following the line of dance. from Ballroom dance

    • The dance technique used for both International and American styles is similar, but International Ballroom allows only closed dance positions, whereas American Smooth allows closed, open and separated dance movements. from Ballroom dance

    • In ballroom dances their common trait is that the dance couple moves (or intends to move) essentially sidewise to the leader's left while partners nearly face each other, with the leader's right side of the body and the follower's left side of the body are closer than the respective opposite sides. from Glossary of partner dance terms

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    • J&J is popular at swing conventions, as well as at ballroom dance competitions in the USA. from Glossary of partner dance terms

    • The term describes a particular style of ballroom dances that contrasts with American Style. from Glossary of partner dance terms

    • The term is mostly used in describing the Rises and falls technique of ballroom dances of Standard (International style) of Smooth (American style) categories: waltzes, tangos, foxtrots. from Glossary of partner dance terms

    • Examples are box step in American Style waltz or natural turn in International Style Waltz. from Glossary of partner dance terms

    • The term describes a particular style of ballroom dances developed in the USA that contrasts with the International Style. from Glossary of partner dance terms

    • This terminology is used mainly in the "International Standard" group of ballroom dances. "Natural turn" and "reverse turn" are names of syllabus figures in waltz, Viennese waltz, foxtrot, quickstep. from Natural and reverse turns

    • Today the Viennese Waltz is a ballroom and partner dance that is part of the International Standard division of contemporary ballroom dance. from Viennese Waltz

    • Waltz is one of the five dances in the Standard (or Modern) category of the International Style ballroom dances. from Waltz (International Standard)

    • It is used in a number of American Style ballroom dances: Rumba, Waltz, bronze-level Foxtrot. from Box Step

    • Box Step, the basic move in some American Style ballroom dances: Rumba, Waltz, bronze-level Foxtrot. from Basic (dance move)

    • Since then it has become an important part in the Australian ballroom scene, holding as much importance in social and competition dancing as Latin or International Standard dances. from New Vogue (dance)

    • Grapevine is the name of a dance figure, which may look different in various ballroom, club, and folk dances, but shares a common appearance: it includes side steps and steps across the support foot. from Grapevine (dance move)

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      World Dance Council The World Dance Council Ltd (WDC), is a registered limited company, and the legal successor to the International…
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      The World Dance Council Ltd (WDC), is a registered limited company, and the legal successor to the International Council of Ballroom Dancing, and was established at a meeting organised by P.J.S Richardson on 22 September 1950 in Edinburgh. For a period from 1996 to 2006, the WDC was known as the World Dance & Dance Sport Council Ltd (WD&DSC).…

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      The World Dance Council Ltd (WDC), is a registered limited company, and the legal successor to the International Council of Ballroom Dancing, and was established at a meeting organised by P.J.S Richardson on 22 September 1950 in Edinburgh. For a period from 1996 to 2006, the WDC was known as the World Dance & Dance Sport Council Ltd (WD&DSC).
      The primary objective, at the time of its formation, was to provide an agreed basis for holding world championships in competitive ballroom dance. That objective has been achieved. Initially consisting of nine European countries and three others, today the WDC has become the leading authority on professional dance competitions, with members in numerous countries throughout the world. Each country is allowed one vote. As of 2006 there are 59 members. Its governing body, the Presidium, consists of a President and five Vice-Presidents.
      WDC includes the Dancesport Committee, the Social Dance Committee and the Amateur League.

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    How Ballroom dance
    Connects To World Dance Council

    • Competitions, sometimes referred to as Dancesport, range from world championships, regulated by the World Dance Council (WDC), to less advanced dancers at various proficiency levels. from Ballroom dance

    • Developed in England, the two styles are now regulated by the World Dance Council (WDC). from Ballroom dance

    • The primary objective, at the time of its formation, was to provide an agreed basis for holding world championships in competitive ballroom dance. from World Dance Council

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    • Official World Championships have been held in the Latin section of ballroom dancing since they were organised by the ICBD in 1959. from World Latin Dance Champions

    • The United States national professional ballroom dance champions are crowned at the United States Dance Championships (formerly USBC and USDSC), as recognized by the National Dance Council of America (NDCA) and the World Dance & DanceSport Council (WD&DSC). from U.S. National Dancesport Champions (Professional Latin)

    • The United States national professional ballroom dance champions are crowned at the United States Dance Championships (formerly USDSC, and USBC), as recognized by the National Dance Council of America (NDCA) and the World Dance & DanceSport Council (WD&DSC). from U.S. National Dancesport Champions (Professional 10-Dance)

    • The United States national professional ballroom dance champions are crowned at the United States Dance Championships (formerly USDSC, and USBC), as recognized by the National Dance Council of America (NDCA) and the World Dance & DanceSport Council (WD&DSC). from U.S. National Dancesport Champions (Professional Rhythm)

    • The United States national professional ballroom dance champions are crowned at the United States Dance Championships (formerly USDSC, and USBC), as recognized by the National Dance Council of America (NDCA) and the World Dance & DanceSport Council (WD&DSC). from U.S. National Dancesport Champions (Professional Standard)

    • The United States national professional ballroom dance champions are crowned at the United States Dance Championships (formerly United States DanceSport Championships, USDSC, and United States Ballroom Championships, USBC), as recognized by the National Dance Council of America (NDCA) and the World Dance & DanceSport Council (WD&DSC). from U.S. National Dancesport Champions (Professional Smooth)

    • The United States national professional ballroom dance champions are crowned at the United States Dance Championships (formerly USDSC, and USBC), as recognized by the National Dance Council of America (NDCA) and the World Dance & DanceSport Council (WD&DSC). from U.S. National Dancesport Champions (Professional 9-Dance)

    • Ten international style ballroom dances—five Standard and five Latin—are defined by the World Dance Council (WDC), which has world-wide membership of all countries taking part in ballroom competitions. from List of DanceSport dances

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      Blackpool Dance Festival The 8-day Blackpool Dance Festival is the world's first and most famous annual ballroom dance competition of…
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      The 8-day Blackpool Dance Festival is the world's first and most famous annual ballroom dance competition of international significance, held in the Empress Ballroom at the Winter Gardens, Blackpool, England since 1920. It is also the largest ballroom competition: in 2013, 2.953 couples from 60 countries took part in the festival.…

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      The 8-day Blackpool Dance Festival is the world's first and most famous annual ballroom dance competition of international significance, held in the Empress Ballroom at the Winter Gardens, Blackpool, England since 1920. It is also the largest ballroom competition: in 2013, 2.953 couples from 60 countries took part in the festival.
      As of the early 21st century the festival is held in May. It covers Ballroom and Latin American dancing, and incorporates the British Open Championships in categories of adult amateur and professional couples and formation teams. In 2005 two new categories were introduced: the British Rising Star Amateur Ballroom and Latin Competitions. Two invitation events, the Professional Team Match and the Exhibition Competition, create much interest.
      The Junior Dance Festival, Blackpool Sequence Dance Festival which incorporates the British Sequence Championships, and British National Dance Festival are also held annually in Blackpool.
      The annual World Professional Dancesport Championship is often held in Blackpool (5 times between 1989 and 2012), but is not connected with the Dance Festival.
      The world's largest amateurs' dance festival is the annual Euro dance festival in Rust, Germany, where shows of professional dancers are combined with workshops for a wide range of dancers from beginners to professionals.

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    How Ballroom dance
    Connects To Blackpool Dance Festival

    • Internationally, the Blackpool Dance Festival, hosted annually at Blackpool, England, is considered the most prestigious event a dancesport competitor can attend. from Ballroom dance

    • The 8-day Blackpool Dance Festival is the world's first and most famous annual ballroom dance competition of international significance, held in the Empress Ballroom at the Winter Gardens, Blackpool, England since 1920. from Blackpool Dance Festival

    • The ballroom has hosted the World Matchplay darts tournament, run by the Professional Darts Corporation, since 1994, which is shown live on Sky Sports It also hosts numerous dance competitions, such as the British Sequence Championships and the Blackpool Dance Festival, an annual ballroom dance competition, since its inception in 1920. from Empress Ballroom

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      Partner dance Partner dances are dances whose basic choreography involves coordinated dancing of two partners, as opposed to…
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      Partner dances are dances whose basic choreography involves coordinated dancing of two partners, as opposed to individuals dancing alone or individually in a non-coordinated manner, and as opposed to groups of people dancing simultaneously in a coordinated manner.

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    How Ballroom dance
    Connects To Partner dance

    • Ballroom dance is a set of partner dances, which are enjoyed both socially and competitively around the world, and growing all the more popular in North America. from Ballroom dance

    • Although this kind of dancing can be seen, for instance, in ballet, this term is usually applied to various forms of social dance, ballroom dance, folk dance, and similar forms. from Partner dance

    • Ballroom dance for a list of partner dances, including non-ballroom styles. from Closed position

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    • Today the Viennese Waltz is a ballroom and partner dance that is part of the International Standard division of contemporary ballroom dance. from Viennese Waltz

    • The Champion Ballroom Academy (founded April 1990) is a dance studio in San Diego, California. The studio's main specialties are social partner-dancing, competitive ballroom dance (aka. Dancesport) and the Latin-dance-based aerobic program called Core Rhythms © . from Champion Ballroom Academy

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      Salsa (dance) Salsa is a popular form of social dance that originated in New York with strong influences from Latin America…
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      Salsa is a popular form of social dance that originated in New York with strong influences from Latin America, particularly Cuba and Puerto Rico. The movements of salsa have its origins in Cuban Son, Cha cha cha, Mambo and other dance forms, and the dance, along with the salsa music, originated in the mid-1970s in New York.

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    How Ballroom dance
    Connects To Salsa (dance)

    • Other dances sometimes placed under the umbrella "ballroom dance" include Nightclub Dances such as Lindy Hop, West Coast Swing, Nightclub Two Step, Hustle, Salsa, and Merengue. from Ballroom dance

    • It is strongly influenced by the Mambo, Swing, Argentine Tango and Latin Ballroom dancing styles. from Salsa (dance)

    • Dips are common to many dance forms (Tango, Lindy Hop, Salsa, Ballroom dances). from Dip (dance move)

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    • Harris is an acknowledged authority and leading choreographer in historical dance, period dance, tango, salsa, swing dance, ballroom dancing, Latin American dancing and theatre dance. from Paul Harris (choreographer)

    • The single's video, directed by Morissette, featured her and (then boyfriend) actor Dash Mihok as dance partners transitioning through time and style, from ballroom to salsa, swing, tap, contemporary and rave. from So Pure

    • Some dancers began to adopt elements of other dance forms such as salsa, ballroom and swing. from Nuevo tango

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      Pasodoble Pasodoble, or paso doble, (literal meaning in Spanish: double-step) is a traditional couple's dance from France and…
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      Pasodoble, or paso doble, (literal meaning in Spanish: double-step) is a traditional couple's dance from France and straight away adopted by the Spanish community. It is danced to the type of music typically played in bullfights during the bullfighters' entrance to the ring (paseo) or during the passes (faena) just before the kill. It corresponds to the pasodoble dance (traditional and ballroom).…

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      Pasodoble, or paso doble, (literal meaning in Spanish: double-step) is a traditional couple's dance from France and straight away adopted by the Spanish community. It is danced to the type of music typically played in bullfights during the bullfighters' entrance to the ring (paseo) or during the passes (faena) just before the kill. It corresponds to the pasodoble dance (traditional and ballroom).
      Pasodoble is a lively style of dance to the duple meter march-like pasodoble music. It is modelled after the sound, drama, and movement of the Spanish and Portuguese bullfight.
      Famous bullfighters have been honoured with pasodoble tunes named after them. Other tunes have been inspired by patriotic motifs or local characters.

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    How Ballroom dance
    Connects To Pasodoble

    • With the exception of a few traveling dances like Samba and Paso Doble, couples do not follow the line of dance but perform their routines more or less in one spot. from Ballroom dance

    • It corresponds to the pasodoble dance (traditional and ballroom). from Pasodoble

    • The competition comprises five dances: rumba, samba, paso doble, cha-cha-cha and jive, as defined in ballroom dancing terms. from World Latin Dance Champions

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    • The dances covered in the Ten Dance are the five International Ballroom (Standard) dances: waltz, foxtrot, quickstep, tango and Viennese waltz, along with the five International Latin Dances: rumba, samba, paso doble, cha-cha-cha and jive, as defined in ballroom dancing terms. from World 10 Dance Champions

    • Several arrangements of the tune are often used for the ballroom Paso Doble dance (to the point that, amongst ballroom dancers, it is known as "the paso doble song" as it is very commonly played in competition due to the need for specific choreography for successful competition Paso). from España Cañí

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      Social dance Social dance is a major category or classification of danceforms or dance styles, where sociability and socializing…
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      Social dance is a major category or classification of danceforms or dance styles, where sociability and socializing are the primary focuses of the dancing. Social dances can be danced with a variety of partners and still be led and followed in a relaxed, easy atmosphere.…

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      Social dance is a major category or classification of danceforms or dance styles, where sociability and socializing are the primary focuses of the dancing. Social dances can be danced with a variety of partners and still be led and followed in a relaxed, easy atmosphere.
      This compares to other major categories based on purpose:
      Many social dances are partner dances. In fact, quite often when spoken about social dances, ballroom or other partner dances are kept in mind. However it is natural to include in this category such groups of dances as circle dances, line dances, novelty dances, or simply club dancing in solo.
      There may be aspects of any of the above dance forms that are either competitive or performance-oriented in nature.

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    How Ballroom dance
    Connects To Social dance

    • In times past, ballroom dancing was social dancing for the privileged, leaving folk dancing for the lower classes. from Ballroom dance

    • Ballroom dance is a set of partner dances, which are enjoyed both socially and competitively around the world, and growing all the more popular in North America. from Ballroom dance

    • Although this kind of dancing can be seen, for instance, in ballet, this term is usually applied to various forms of social dance, ballroom dance, folk dance, and similar forms. from Partner dance

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    • The One-Step was a ballroom dance popular in social dancing at the beginning of the 20th century. from One-Step

    • Social dance forms a large part of the evening; actual ballroom dancing may or may not occur. from Ball (dance)

    • Telling him that tap dancing is inappropriate for social dancing she attempts to instruct him in ballroom dancing, but Data finds it much more difficult, as he cannot watch Dr. Crusher's feet. from Data's Day

    • Modern popular dance music initially emerged from late 19th century's Western ballroom and social dance music. from Dance music

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      World DanceSport Federation The World DanceSport Federation (WDSF), formerly the International DanceSport Federation (IDSF), is the…
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      The World DanceSport Federation (WDSF), formerly the International DanceSport Federation (IDSF), is the international governing body of dancesport and Wheelchair DanceSport, as recognised by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and the International Paralympic Committee (IPC).…

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      The World DanceSport Federation (WDSF), formerly the International DanceSport Federation (IDSF), is the international governing body of dancesport and Wheelchair DanceSport, as recognised by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and the International Paralympic Committee (IPC).
      Originally founded in 1957 as the International Council of Amateur Dancers (ICAD), it took up the name IDSF in 1990. In 2011, it was renamed to WDSF to emphasise the global character of the organization.

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    How Ballroom dance
    Connects To World DanceSport Federation

    • It has recognized another body, the World DanceSport Federation (WDSF), as the sole representative body for dancesport in the Olympic Games. from Ballroom dance

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      Competitive dance Competitive dance is a popular, widespread activity in which competitors perform dances in any of several permitted…
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      Competitive dance is a popular, widespread activity in which competitors perform dances in any of several permitted dance styles—such as acro, ballet, jazz, hip-hop, lyrical, modern, and tap—before a common group of judges. This is in contrast with other activities that involve competition among dancers based on purpose, or specific dance style, such as pom squad and dancesport.…

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      Competitive dance is a popular, widespread activity in which competitors perform dances in any of several permitted dance styles—such as acro, ballet, jazz, hip-hop, lyrical, modern, and tap—before a common group of judges. This is in contrast with other activities that involve competition among dancers based on purpose, or specific dance style, such as pom squad and dancesport.
      The competitive dance industry largely consists of competition production companies—also sometimes called dance competition companies—that conduct regional competitions at stops along their annual, nationwide tours. Dancers who compete at these regional competitions are students ranging in age from approximately four to eighteen years old. Dance schools (often referred to as dance studios) arrange for their classes to compete as groups. Advanced dancers may be chosen to compete solos, duets, trios, or in a small group dance in addition to or in place of large group routines. Competitions typically begin in January and end in July or August.
      Competitive dancers must be physically fit because even short dances can be physically demanding. Dancers must continuously train to maintain and improve their technique, balance skills, strength and flexibility. Except for holidays and short breaks during the summer, competitive dancing is typically a year round activity: dancers attend classes during competition season, to refine their competitive routines, and during off-season to prepare for the next upcoming competition season.

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    How Ballroom dance
    Connects To Competitive dance

    • The International Olympic Committee now recognizes competitive ballroom dance. from Ballroom dance

    • The 8-day Blackpool Dance Festival is the world's first and most famous annual ballroom dance competition of international significance, held in the Empress Ballroom at the Winter Gardens, Blackpool, England since 1920. from Blackpool Dance Festival

    • The ballroom has hosted the World Matchplay darts tournament, run by the Professional Darts Corporation, since 1994, which is shown live on Sky Sports It also hosts numerous dance competitions, such as the British Sequence Championships and the Blackpool Dance Festival, an annual ballroom dance competition, since its inception in 1920. from Empress Ballroom

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    • America's Ballroom Challenge is a competitive ballroom dance television series airing on Public Broadcasting Service in the United States since 2006. from America's Ballroom Challenge

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      Samba (ballroom dance) The international Ballroom version of samba is a lively, rhythmical dance with elements from Brazilian samba. It…
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      The international Ballroom version of samba is a lively, rhythmical dance with elements from Brazilian samba. It has recently been exposed to the American public in television programmes such as Strictly come dancing and Dancing with the stars. It differs considerably from the original samba styles of Brazil, in particular it differs from Ballroom Samba…

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      The international Ballroom version of samba is a lively, rhythmical dance with elements from Brazilian samba. It has recently been exposed to the American public in television programmes such as Strictly come dancing and Dancing with the stars. It differs considerably from the original samba styles of Brazil, in particular it differs from Ballroom Samba in Brazil itself. It is often not always danced to music with a samba rhythm and often danced to music with less complex 2/4 and 4/4 time. In particular in the popular television programmes Strictly come dancing and Dancing with the stars it almost never danced to samba music or a samba rhythm. Moreover its performance does not necessarily include the characteristic steps from Samba no Pé. In many other ways it though been influenced by the Brazilian version of samba, in particular maxixe, and subsequently developed independently from samba in Brazil.

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    How Ballroom dance
    Connects To Samba (ballroom dance)

    • With the exception of a few traveling dances like Samba and Paso Doble, couples do not follow the line of dance but perform their routines more or less in one spot. from Ballroom dance

    • The international Ballroom version of samba is a lively, rhythmical dance with elements from Brazilian samba. from Samba (ballroom dance)

    • The competition comprises five dances: rumba, samba, paso doble, cha-cha-cha and jive, as defined in ballroom dancing terms. from World Latin Dance Champions

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    • The dances covered in the Ten Dance are the five International Ballroom (Standard) dances: waltz, foxtrot, quickstep, tango and Viennese waltz, along with the five International Latin Dances: rumba, samba, paso doble, cha-cha-cha and jive, as defined in ballroom dancing terms. from World 10 Dance Champions

    • Samba de Gafieira must be distinguished from the ballroom Samba, danced in International Latin and American Rhythm ballroom dance styles. from Samba de Gafieira

    • On May 21, 2009, SYTYCD aired two males performing ballroom dance together for the first time, with dancers Misha and Mitchel performing a Samba. from So You Think You Can Dance (U.S. season 5)

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      Imperial Society of Teachers of Dancing The Imperial Society of Teachers of Dancing (ISTD) is a dance teaching and examination board based in London…
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      The Imperial Society of Teachers of Dancing (ISTD) is a dance teaching and examination board based in London, England, and operating internationally. Established on 25 July 1904 as the Imperial Society of Dance Teachers, it changed to its current name in 1925 and is now a registered educational charity. The ISTD provides training in a…

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      The Imperial Society of Teachers of Dancing (ISTD) is a dance teaching and examination board based in London, England, and operating internationally. Established on 25 July 1904 as the Imperial Society of Dance Teachers, it changed to its current name in 1925 and is now a registered educational charity. The ISTD provides training in a range of dance styles, with examination syllabi for students, and training courses for people wishing to become certified dance teachers. The work of the ISTD is organised into two main boards, one for Dancesport and the other for Theatre dance. The society also incorporates the Cecchetti Society, which exists to preserve the Cecchetti method of classical ballet training. The ISTD is an awarding body recognised by the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority and the Council for Dance Education and Training and is also a member of the British Dance Council. The ISTD is also represented on the committees of numerous other arts, dance and culture related organisations.

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    How Ballroom dance
    Connects To Imperial Society of Teachers of Dancing

    • In medal exams, which are run by bodies such as the Imperial Society of Teachers of Dancing (ISTD), each dancer performs two or more dances in a certain genre in front of a judge. from Ballroom dance

    • Here the huge Arthur Murray organisation in America, and the dance societies in England, such as the Imperial Society of Teachers of Dancing, were highly influential. from Ballroom dance

    • He was a founding member of the Ballroom Committee of the Imperial Society of Teachers of Dancing which codified the theory and practice of Ballroom Dance – now known as the International Style – and published the first book embodying the new standards in 1927. from Victor Silvester

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    • The two International Style syllabi of ISTD and IDTA for quickstep differ very little. from Quickstep

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      Argentine tango Argentine tango is a musical genre of simple quadruple metre and binary musical form, and the social dance that…
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      Argentine tango is a musical genre of simple quadruple metre and binary musical form, and the social dance that accompanies it. Its lyrics and music are marked by nostalgia, expressed through melodic instruments including the bandoneón. Originating at the ending of the 19th century in the suburbs of Buenos Aires, and Montevideo, Uruguay, it quickly…

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      Argentine tango is a musical genre of simple quadruple metre and binary musical form, and the social dance that accompanies it. Its lyrics and music are marked by nostalgia, expressed through melodic instruments including the bandoneón. Originating at the ending of the 19th century in the suburbs of Buenos Aires, and Montevideo, Uruguay, it quickly grew in popularity and spread internationally. Among its leading figures are the singer and songwriter Carlos Gardel and composers/performers Francisco Canaro, Juan D'Arienzo, Osvaldo Pugliese, and Ástor Piazzolla.

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    How Ballroom dance
    Connects To Argentine tango

    • In Europe, Latin Swing dances include Argentine Tango, Mambo, Lindy Hop, Swing Boogie (sometimes also known as Nostalgic Boogie), and Disco Fox. from Ballroom dance

    • It is strongly influenced by the Mambo, Swing, Argentine Tango and Latin Ballroom dancing styles. from Salsa (dance)

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      Mambo (dance) Mambo is a Latin dance of Cuba. Mambo music was invented during the 1930s by Arsenio Rodríguez, developed in Havana…
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      Mambo is a Latin dance of Cuba. Mambo music was invented during the 1930s by Arsenio Rodríguez, developed in Havana by Cachao and made popular by Dámaso Pérez Prado and Benny Moré.…

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      Mambo is a Latin dance of Cuba. Mambo music was invented during the 1930s by Arsenio Rodríguez, developed in Havana by Cachao and made popular by Dámaso Pérez Prado and Benny Moré.
      In the late 1940s, Perez Prado came up with the dance for the mambo music and became the first person to market his music as "mambo". After Havana, Prado moved his music to Mexico, where his music and the dance was adopted. The original mambo dance was characterized by freedom and complicated foot-steps. Some Mexican entertainers became well known dancers like Tongolele, Adalberto Martínez, Rosa Carmina, Tin Tan and Lilia Prado. Most of these accompanied Prado in live presentations or were seen in Mexican films.
      The original form of the dance and music are alive and well in Cuba and in taught in dance studios in Mexico City. An example of authentic Mambo dance can be seen in the film The Motorcycle Diaries.
      The Mambo is one of the most sensual and emotional Latin American ballroom dances.swaying hip movements,facial expressions,arm movements and holds all add to the sensuality of the dance.
      The Mambo dance that was invented by Perez Prado and was popular in the 1940s and 50s in Cuba, Mexico City, and New York is completely different from the modern dance that New Yorkers now call 'Mambo', which is also known as Salsa "on 2". The original mambo dance contains no breaking steps or basic steps at all. The Cuban dance wasn't accepted by many professional dance teachers. Cuban dancers would describe mambo as "feeling the music" in which sound and movement were merged through the body. Professional dance teachers in the US saw this approach to dancing as "extreme," "undisciplined," and thus, deemed it necessary to standardize the dance to present it as a sell-able commodity for the social or ballroom market
      The modern dance from New York was popularized in the 1980s by Eddie Torres, Angel Rodriguez of RazzM'Tazz Mambo Dance Company, and others, many of whom were 2nd generation New York Puerto Ricans. This style is sometimes danced to mambo music, but more often to salsa dura (old-school salsa). It is termed "mambo on 2" because the break, or direction change, in the basic step occurs on count 2. The Eddie Torres and Razz M'Tazz schools each have different basic steps, even though they share this same basic feature. Eddie Torres describes his version as a "street" style he developed out of what he saw on the Bronx streets. The RazzM'Tazz version is closer to the Palladium mambo (from the Palladium ballroom in the 1950s), whose basic step was in turn derived from Cuban son, with which it shares its timing (234 - 678, with pauses on 1 and 5) both Styles derived from the American Mambo with the freestyle steps based on jazz and tap steps.

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    • In Europe, Latin Swing dances include Argentine Tango, Mambo, Lindy Hop, Swing Boogie (sometimes also known as Nostalgic Boogie), and Disco Fox. from Ballroom dance

    • It is strongly influenced by the Mambo, Swing, Argentine Tango and Latin Ballroom dancing styles. from Salsa (dance)

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      Formation dance Formation dance is a style of ballroom dancing. It is pattern or shadow team dancing by couples in a formation…
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      Formation dance is a style of ballroom dancing. It is pattern or shadow team dancing by couples in a formation team. The choreography may be based on a particular dance or a medley of dances. Formation dancing may be done for exhibition or for competition between teams.There is also a type of formation in Bhangra.

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    How Ballroom dance
    Connects To Formation dance

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      British Dance Council The British Dance Council was formed in 1929 as the Official Board of Ballroom Dancing (OBBD). The name was…
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      The British Dance Council was formed in 1929 as the Official Board of Ballroom Dancing (OBBD). The name was subsequently changed in 1985 to the British Council of Ballroom Dancing and in 1996, the name was changed to British Dance Council. The BDC is the recognised governing body for Ballroom, Latin, Sequence dancing & Freestle/Disco dance in the United Kingdom.…

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      The British Dance Council was formed in 1929 as the Official Board of Ballroom Dancing (OBBD). The name was subsequently changed in 1985 to the British Council of Ballroom Dancing and in 1996, the name was changed to British Dance Council. The BDC is the recognised governing body for Ballroom, Latin, Sequence dancing & Freestle/Disco dance in the United Kingdom.
      The BDC was originally formed to establish uniformity in the teaching of Ballroom Dance nationwide, although its responsibility are now extensive, both in the UK and abroad. The primary function of the BDC is to devise and oversee the rules for competitive dancing. All dance competitions in the UK, both amateur and professional are governed by BDC rules. The BDC is also the national awarding body for championship titles in the UK.
      Standardisation is also the other key function of the BDC. There are a number of leading dance organisations in the UK, and each of these organisations have slight differences in technique and vocabulary. The BDC works to ensure that where possible, teachers from any organisation, will be teaching dance the same way. This is particularly important competitively, to make sure that all dancers can understand and perform their dances within the BDC rules, regardless of which dance organisation they trained with.

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    Connects To British Dance Council

    • In Britain there is the British Dance Council, which grants national and regional championship titles, such as the British Ballroom Championships, the British Sequence Championships and the United Kingdom Championships. from Ballroom dance

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      West Coast Swing West Coast Swing (WCS aka Push or Whip) is a partner dance with roots in Lindy Hop. It is characterized by a…
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      West Coast Swing (WCS aka Push or Whip) is a partner dance with roots in Lindy Hop. It is characterized by a distinctive elastic look that results from its basic extension-compression technique of partner connection, and is danced primarily in a slotted area on the dance floor. The dance allows for both partners to improvise steps while dancing together, putting West Coast Swing in a short list of dances that put a premium on improvisation.…

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      West Coast Swing (WCS aka Push or Whip) is a partner dance with roots in Lindy Hop. It is characterized by a distinctive elastic look that results from its basic extension-compression technique of partner connection, and is danced primarily in a slotted area on the dance floor. The dance allows for both partners to improvise steps while dancing together, putting West Coast Swing in a short list of dances that put a premium on improvisation.
      Typically the follower walks into new patterns traveling forward on counts "1" and "2" of each basic pattern, rather than rocking back. Traditional figures include 6-count and 8-count patterns of one of the four basic varieties: (1) Starter Step, (2) Side Pass, (3) Push Break / Sugar Push, (4) Whip.
      Alternatively the basic patterns in WCS are defined as: Sugar Push; Left Side Pass; Righ Side Pass; Touch Turn; and Whip. Virtually all other moves in WCS are variations of these basic patterns.
      The Anchor Step is a common ending pattern of many West Coast Swing figures.

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    • Other dances sometimes placed under the umbrella "ballroom dance" include Nightclub Dances such as Lindy Hop, West Coast Swing, Nightclub Two Step, Hustle, Salsa, and Merengue. from Ballroom dance

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      Lindy Hop The Lindy Hop is an American dance that evolved in Harlem, New York City in the 1920s and 1930s and originally…
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      The Lindy Hop is an American dance that evolved in Harlem, New York City in the 1920s and 1930s and originally evolved with the jazz music of that time. It was very popular during the Swing era of the late 1930s and early 1940s. Lindy was a fusion of many dances that preceded it or…

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      The Lindy Hop is an American dance that evolved in Harlem, New York City in the 1920s and 1930s and originally evolved with the jazz music of that time. It was very popular during the Swing era of the late 1930s and early 1940s. Lindy was a fusion of many dances that preceded it or were popular during its development but is mainly based on jazz, tap, breakaway and Charleston. It is frequently described as a jazz dance and is a member of the swing dance family.
      In its development, the Lindy Hop combined elements of both partnered and solo dancing by using the movements and improvisation of black dances along with the formal eight-count structure of European partner dances. This is most clearly illustrated in the Lindy's basic step, the swingout. In this step's open position, each dancer is generally connected hand-to-hand; in its closed position, men and women are connected as though in an embrace.
      There was renewed interest in the dance in the 1980s from American, Swedish, and British dancers and the Lindy Hop is now represented by dancers and loosely affiliated grass roots organizations in North America, South America, Europe, Asia, and Oceania.
      Lindy Hop is sometimes referred to as a street dance, referring to its improvisational and social nature.

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    Connects To Lindy Hop

    • In Europe, Latin Swing dances include Argentine Tango, Mambo, Lindy Hop, Swing Boogie (sometimes also known as Nostalgic Boogie), and Disco Fox. from Ballroom dance

    • Other dances sometimes placed under the umbrella "ballroom dance" include Nightclub Dances such as Lindy Hop, West Coast Swing, Nightclub Two Step, Hustle, Salsa, and Merengue. from Ballroom dance

    • Dips are common to many dance forms (Tango, Lindy Hop, Salsa, Ballroom dances). from Dip (dance move)

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      Sequence dance Sequence dancing is a form of dance in which a preset pattern of movements is followed, usually to music which is…
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      Sequence dancing is a form of dance in which a preset pattern of movements is followed, usually to music which is also predetermined. Sequence dancing may include dances of many different styles. The term may include ballroom dances which move round the floor as well as line, square and circle dances.…

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      Sequence dancing is a form of dance in which a preset pattern of movements is followed, usually to music which is also predetermined. Sequence dancing may include dances of many different styles. The term may include ballroom dances which move round the floor as well as line, square and circle dances.
      Sequence dancing in general is much older than modern ballroom dances. With the exception of the waltz, invented around 1800, all dances in ballrooms were sequence dances until the early 20th century. After modern ballroom dancing developed, in England, sequence dancing continued. It included so-called 'Old Time' dances and also adapted versions of the new ballroom dances, and then versions of Latin dances. Sequence dancing is a competitive sport as well as a social pastime.
      The British Sequence Championships is the most famous annual sequence dance competition and is part of the Blackpool Sequence Dance Festival. This is held in the Empress Ballroom, Winter Gardens, Blackpool, England, since 1949.

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    Connects To Sequence dance

    • Sequence dancing, which is danced predominantly in the United Kingdom, is also sometimes included as a type of Ballroom dancing. from Ballroom dance

    • The term may include ballroom dances which move round the floor as well as line, square and circle dances. from Sequence dance

    • The English Amateur Dancesport Association (EADA) Ltd is a volunteer-led organisation which represents the interests of Amateur Dancers (including Ballroom, Latin American, Sequence dancing and Freestyle) within England. from English Amateur Dancesport Association

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    • A curriculum may involve the study of one or more dance genres, including formal genres such as ballet, ballroom, contemporary, jazz, Latin, and tap dance, and informal and social genres such as line, freestyle, and sequence dancing. from Dance education

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      Folk dance Folk dances are dances that share some or all of the following attributes:More controversially, some people define…
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      Folk dances are dances that share some or all of the following attributes:
      More controversially, some people define folk dancing as dancing for which there is no governing body or dancing for which there are no competitive or professional institutions. The term "folk dance" is sometimes applied to dances of historical importance in European culture and…

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      Folk dances are dances that share some or all of the following attributes:
      More controversially, some people define folk dancing as dancing for which there is no governing body or dancing for which there are no competitive or professional institutions. The term "folk dance" is sometimes applied to dances of historical importance in European culture and history; typically originating before the 20th century. For other cultures the terms "ethnic dance" or "traditional dance" are sometimes used, although the latter terms may encompass ceremonial dances.
      There are a number of modern dances, such as hip hop dance, that evolve spontaneously, but the term "folk dance" is generally not applied to them, and the terms "street dance" or "vernacular dance" are used instead. The term "folk dance" is reserved for dances which are to a significant degree bound by tradition and originated in the times when the distinction existed between the dances of "common folk" and the dances of the "high society".
      A number of modern ballroom dances originated from folk ones.
      The terms "ethnic" and "traditional" are used when it is required to emphasize the cultural roots of the dance. In this sense, nearly all folk dances are ethnic ones. If some dances, such as polka, cross ethnic boundaries and even cross the boundary between "folk" and "ballroom dance", ethnic differences are often considerable enough to mention, e.g., Czech polka vs. German polka.
      Not all ethnic dances are folk dances; for example, ritual dances or dances of ritual origin are not considered to be folk dances. Ritual dances are usually called "Religious dances" because of their purpose.

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    Connects To Folk dance

    • In times past, ballroom dancing was social dancing for the privileged, leaving folk dancing for the lower classes. from Ballroom dance

    • Although this kind of dancing can be seen, for instance, in ballet, this term is usually applied to various forms of social dance, ballroom dance, folk dance, and similar forms. from Partner dance

    • It refers to types of ballroom dance and folk dance, and includes a wide range of dances originating in Latin America, Cuba and Puerto Rico. from Latin dance

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    • The waltz is a smooth, progressive ballroom and folk dance in time, performed primarily in closed position. from Waltz

    • For example ballet, ballroom dance and folk dance can be considered a single dance style or a family of related dances. from List of dances

    • Grapevine is the name of a dance figure, which may look different in various ballroom, club, and folk dances, but shares a common appearance: it includes side steps and steps across the support foot. from Grapevine (dance move)

    • Pivot turns are common in ballroom dancing, folk dancing, ethnic dances. from Pivot turn

    • A typical Palace contained one or several cinema halls, concert hall(s), dance studios (folk dance, ballet, ballroom dance), various do-it-yourself hobby groups, amateur radio groups, amateur theatre studios, amateur musical studios and bands, lectoriums (lecture halls), and many more. from Palace of Culture

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      British Sequence Championships The British Sequence Championships are ballroom dancing championships for adults and children held annually in…
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      The British Sequence Championships are ballroom dancing championships for adults and children held annually in Blackpool, England.
      The championships for adults take place as part of the Blackpool Sequence Dance Festival and have been running since 1949. They are held in the Empress Ballroom at the Winter Gardens in Blackpool. Dancers compete in up to five…

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      The British Sequence Championships are ballroom dancing championships for adults and children held annually in Blackpool, England.
      The championships for adults take place as part of the Blackpool Sequence Dance Festival and have been running since 1949. They are held in the Empress Ballroom at the Winter Gardens in Blackpool. Dancers compete in up to five sequence dances determined by the organiser each year for the titles. The British Championship is seen as the highlight of the year, not only because it is "one of the country's most prestigious titles", but also due to the grandeur of the location.
      The Blackpool Sequence Dance Festival incorporates a popular competition day for children on the Saturday, followed by inventive competitions for professionals and the British Sequence Championships for Professional, Amateur Classical Sequence (previously "Old Time"), Amateur Modern Sequence, Senior Classical Sequence and Under 21s Classical Sequence. The championship events are granted by the British Dance Council and are run under their rules. The festival celebrated its 60th year in 2009.
      Entrants to the Championships predominantly come from Great Britain, although many Irish dance schools have attended the festival over the years. Entrants have also come from as far away as Japan and Australia.
      The British Sequence Championships for children takes place as part of the Blackpool Junior Dance Festival, running since 1947. They start on Easter Monday each year and run for a week. Until 2010, when increasing numbers prompted a move to the Empress Ballroom, they had been held at the Tower Ballroom in Blackpool Tower. The events incorporate the Juvenile Classical Sequence Championship, the Junior Classical Sequence Championship and the Junior Modern Sequence Championship.
      Famous entrants to the championships include a young Cheryl Cole and former World Amateur Ballroom Champion Jonathon Crossley with partner Kylie Jones.

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    How Ballroom dance
    Connects To British Sequence Championships

    • In Britain there is the British Dance Council, which grants national and regional championship titles, such as the British Ballroom Championships, the British Sequence Championships and the United Kingdom Championships. from Ballroom dance

    • The British Sequence Championships are ballroom dancing championships for adults and children held annually in Blackpool, England. from British Sequence Championships

    • The ballroom has hosted the World Matchplay darts tournament, run by the Professional Darts Corporation, since 1994, which is shown live on Sky Sports It also hosts numerous dance competitions, such as the British Sequence Championships and the Blackpool Dance Festival, an annual ballroom dance competition, since its inception in 1920. from Empress Ballroom

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      Arthur Murray Arthur Murray (April 4, 1895 – March 3, 1991) was an American dance instructor and businessman, whose name is most…
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      Arthur Murray (April 4, 1895 – March 3, 1991) was an American dance instructor and businessman, whose name is most often associated with the dance studio chain that bears his name.…

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      Arthur Murray (April 4, 1895 – March 3, 1991) was an American dance instructor and businessman, whose name is most often associated with the dance studio chain that bears his name.
      His pupils included Eleanor Roosevelt, the Duke of Windsor, John D. Rockefeller Jr., Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney, Barbara Hutton, Elizabeth Arden, Manuel L. Quezon, and Jack Dempsey. Television evangelist D. James Kennedy and Little House on the Prairie actress Katherine MacGregor were instructors of Murray's technique.
      Arthur Murray was inducted into the National Museum of Dance's Mr. & Mrs. Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney Hall of Fame in 2007.

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    Connects To Arthur Murray

    • Here the huge Arthur Murray organisation in America, and the dance societies in England, such as the Imperial Society of Teachers of Dancing, were highly influential. from Ballroom dance

    • He soon began teaching ballroom dancing to patients from the greater Boston, Massachusetts area, at the Devereux Mansion Physical Therapy Clinic in Marblehead, Massachusetts, before moving to Asheville, North Carolina. from Arthur Murray

    • On June 4, 1951, Heimlich married Jane Murray, daughter of ballroom-dancing entrepreneur Arthur Murray. from Henry Heimlich

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      Hustle (dance) The Hustle is a catchall name for some disco dances which were extremely popular in the 1970s. Today it mostly…
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      The Hustle is a catchall name for some disco dances which were extremely popular in the 1970s. Today it mostly refers to the unique partner dance done in ballrooms and nightclubs to disco music. It has some features in common with swing dance. Its basic steps are somewhat similar to the Discofox, which emerged at…

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      The Hustle is a catchall name for some disco dances which were extremely popular in the 1970s. Today it mostly refers to the unique partner dance done in ballrooms and nightclubs to disco music. It has some features in common with swing dance. Its basic steps are somewhat similar to the Discofox, which emerged at about the same time and is more familiar in various European countries. In the 1970s there was also a line dance called the Hustle. Modern partner hustle is sometimes referred to as New York Hustle. People still do this dance today.

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    How Ballroom dance
    Connects To Hustle (dance)

    • Other dances sometimes placed under the umbrella "ballroom dance" include Nightclub Dances such as Lindy Hop, West Coast Swing, Nightclub Two Step, Hustle, Salsa, and Merengue. from Ballroom dance

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      Skating system The Skating system is a method of compiling scores in ballroom dance competitions. It was introduced by the British…
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      The Skating system is a method of compiling scores in ballroom dance competitions. It was introduced by the British Official Board of Ballroom Dancing (now British Dance Council) in 1937. It was first used during the Blackpool Dance Festival and has gradually been adopted in ballroom competition around the world as well as by other dance competitions, e.g., by the World Salsa Federation.…

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      The Skating system is a method of compiling scores in ballroom dance competitions. It was introduced by the British Official Board of Ballroom Dancing (now British Dance Council) in 1937. It was first used during the Blackpool Dance Festival and has gradually been adopted in ballroom competition around the world as well as by other dance competitions, e.g., by the World Salsa Federation.
      The skating system consists of 11 rules, 10 of which determine the scoring of the final round.

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    Connects To Skating system

    • The scorekeepers—called scrutineers—will tally the total number recalls accumulated by each couple through each round until the finals, when the Skating system is used to place each couple by ordinals, typically 1–6, though the number of couples in the final may vary. from Ballroom dance

    • The Skating system is a method of compiling scores in ballroom dance competitions. from Skating system

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      Vernon and Irene Castle Vernon and Irene Castle were a husband-and-wife team of ballroom dancers of the early 20th century, who appeared on…
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      Vernon and Irene Castle were a husband-and-wife team of ballroom dancers of the early 20th century, who appeared on Broadway and in silent films. They are credited with reviving the popularity of modern dancing. Vernon Castle (2 May 1887 – 15 February 1918) was born William Vernon Blyth in Norwich, Norfolk, England. Irene Castle (17 April 1893 – 25 January 1969) was born Irene Foote in New Rochelle, New York.…

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      Vernon and Irene Castle were a husband-and-wife team of ballroom dancers of the early 20th century, who appeared on Broadway and in silent films. They are credited with reviving the popularity of modern dancing. Vernon Castle (2 May 1887 – 15 February 1918) was born William Vernon Blyth in Norwich, Norfolk, England. Irene Castle (17 April 1893 – 25 January 1969) was born Irene Foote in New Rochelle, New York.
      The couple reached the peak of their popularity in Irving Berlin's first Broadway show, Watch Your Step (1914), in which they refined and popularized the Foxtrot. They also helped to promote ragtime, jazz rhythms and African-American music for dance. Irene became a fashion icon through her appearances on stage and in early movies, and both Castles were in demand as teachers and writers on dance.
      After serving with distinction as a pilot in the Royal Flying Corps during World War I, Vernon died in a plane crash on a flight training base in Texas in 1918. Irene continued to perform solo in Broadway, vaudeville and motion picture productions over the next decade. She remarried three times, had children and became an animal-rights activist. In 1939, her life with Vernon was dramatized in The Story of Vernon and Irene Castle.

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    Connects To Vernon and Irene Castle

    • Here Vernon and Irene Castle were important, and so was a generation of English dancers in the 1920s, including Josephine Bradley and Victor Silvester. from Ballroom dance

    • Vernon and Irene Castle were a husband-and-wife team of ballroom dancers of the early 20th century, who appeared on Broadway and in silent films. from Vernon and Irene Castle

    • He drew from a variety of influences, including tap and other black rhythms, classical dance and the elevated style of Vernon and Irene Castle, to create a uniquely recognizable dance style which greatly influenced the American Smooth style of ballroom dance and set standards against which subsequent film dance musicals would be judged. from Fred Astaire

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    • More coverage was given to popular entertainment, with Gene Tunney writing on boxing, Lillian Gish on acting and Irene Castle on ballroom dancing. George Bernard Shaw contributed a well-regarded article on socialism. from History of the Encyclopædia Britannica

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      Concert dance Concert dance (also known as performance dance or theatre dance in the United Kingdom) is dance performed for an…
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      Concert dance (also known as performance dance or theatre dance in the United Kingdom) is dance performed for an audience. It is frequently performed in a theatre setting, though this is not a requirement, and it is usually choreographed and performed to set music.…

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      Concert dance (also known as performance dance or theatre dance in the United Kingdom) is dance performed for an audience. It is frequently performed in a theatre setting, though this is not a requirement, and it is usually choreographed and performed to set music.
      By contrast, social dance and participation dance may be performed without an audience and, typically, these dance forms are neither choreographed nor danced to set music, though there are exceptions. For example, some ceremonial dances and baroque dances blend concert dance with participation dance by having participants assume the role of performer or audience at different moments.

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    How Ballroom dance
    Connects To Concert dance

    • Because of its performance and entertainment aspects, ballroom dance is also widely enjoyed on stage, film, and television. from Ballroom dance

    • The IDTA is divided into two distinct branches, the Theatre Branch branch and the Ballroom Branch. from International Dance Teachers Association

    • Harris is an acknowledged authority and leading choreographer in historical dance, period dance, tango, salsa, swing dance, ballroom dancing, Latin American dancing and theatre dance. from Paul Harris (choreographer)

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      Victor Silvester Victor Marlborough Silvester OBE (25 February 1900 – 14 August 1978) was an English dancer, author, musician and…
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      Victor Marlborough Silvester OBE (25 February 1900 – 14 August 1978) was an English dancer, author, musician and bandleader from the British dance band era. He was a significant figure in the development of ballroom dance during the first half of the 20th century, and his records sold 75 million copies from the 1930s through to the 1980s.

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    How Ballroom dance
    Connects To Victor Silvester

    • Here Vernon and Irene Castle were important, and so was a generation of English dancers in the 1920s, including Josephine Bradley and Victor Silvester. from Ballroom dance

    • He was a founding member of the Ballroom Committee of the Imperial Society of Teachers of Dancing which codified the theory and practice of Ballroom Dance – now known as the International Style – and published the first book embodying the new standards in 1927. from Victor Silvester

    • He was a significant figure in the development of ballroom dance during the first half of the 20th century, and his records sold 75 million copies from the 1930s through to the 1980s. from Victor Silvester

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      New Vogue (dance) The New Vogue dance style is an Australian form of sequence dancing that originated in the 1930s. Since then it has…
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      The New Vogue dance style is an Australian form of sequence dancing that originated in the 1930s. Since then it has become an important part in the Australian ballroom scene, holding as much importance in social and competition dancing as Latin or International Standard dances.

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    How Ballroom dance
    Connects To New Vogue (dance)

    • Australian New Vogue is danced both competitively and socially. from Ballroom dance

    • Since then it has become an important part in the Australian ballroom scene, holding as much importance in social and competition dancing as Latin or International Standard dances. from New Vogue (dance)

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      Historical dance Historical dance (or early dance) is a term covering a wide variety of Western European-based dance types from the…
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      Historical dance (or early dance) is a term covering a wide variety of Western European-based dance types from the past as they are danced in the present. Historical dances are danced as performance, for pleasure at themed balls or dance clubs, as historical reenactment, or for musicological or historical research purposes.…

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      Historical dance (or early dance) is a term covering a wide variety of Western European-based dance types from the past as they are danced in the present. Historical dances are danced as performance, for pleasure at themed balls or dance clubs, as historical reenactment, or for musicological or historical research purposes.
      Dances from the early 20th century can be recreated precisely, being within living memory and after the advent of film and video recording. Earlier dance types, however, must be reconstructed from less reliable evidence such as surviving notations and instruction manuals.
      For performance dancing, see the history of dance article.

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    Connects To Historical dance

    • The definition of ballroom dance also depends on the era: balls have featured popular dances of the day such as the Minuet, Quadrille, Polonaise, Polka, Mazurka, and others, which are now considered to be historical dances. from Ballroom dance

    • Harris is an acknowledged authority and leading choreographer in historical dance, period dance, tango, salsa, swing dance, ballroom dancing, Latin American dancing and theatre dance. from Paul Harris (choreographer)

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      Hermes Pan (choreographer) Hermes Pan (December 10, 1909 – September 19, 1990) was an American dancer and choreographer, principally…
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      Hermes Pan (December 10, 1909 – September 19, 1990) was an American dancer and choreographer, principally remembered as Fred Astaire's choreographic collaborator on the famous 1930s movie musicals starring Astaire and Ginger Rogers.

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    How Ballroom dance
    Connects To Hermes Pan (choreographer)

    • Much of Astaire and Rogers' work portrayed social dancing, although the performances were highly choreographed (often by Astaire or Hermes Pan), and meticulously staged and rehearsed. from Ballroom dance

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      Merengue (dance) Merengue (/məˈrɛŋɡeɪ/) is a style of Dominican music and dance. Partners hold each other in a closed position. The…
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      Merengue (/məˈrɛŋɡeɪ/) is a style of Dominican music and dance. Partners hold each other in a closed position. The leader holds the follower's waist with the leader's right hand, while holding the follower's right hand with the leader's left hand at the follower's eye level. Partners bend their knees slightly left and right, thus making…

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      Merengue (/məˈrɛŋɡeɪ/) is a style of Dominican music and dance. Partners hold each other in a closed position. The leader holds the follower's waist with the leader's right hand, while holding the follower's right hand with the leader's left hand at the follower's eye level. Partners bend their knees slightly left and right, thus making the hips move left and right. The hips of the leader and follower move in the same direction throughout the song. Partners may walk sideways or circle each other, in small steps. They can switch to an open position and do separate turns without letting go each other's hands or releasing one hand. During these turns they may twist and tie their handhold into intricate pretzels. Other choreographies are possible.
      Merengue was made by the official music and dance of the Dominican Republic by Rafael Trujillo. In an origin's version, the dance originated from the slaves working in sugar beet fields. These slaves were connected to one another by a chain strapped to their ankles and had to walk in such a manner as to drag one leg.
      Although the tempo of the music may be frenetic, the upper body is kept majestic and turns are slow, typically four beats/steps per complete turn.
      In the social dancing of the United States the "empalizada" style is replaced by exaggerated Cuban motion, taught in chain ballroom studios for dances of Latin American origin (cha-cha-cha, rumba, mambo, salsa).
      According to Merengue: Dominican Music and Dominican Identity by Paul Austerlitz, "we will probably never know with certainty the true origin of this music, but theories about it express deep-noted feelings about Dominican identity. One theory links merengue to the Haitian mereng. Although they differ in important ways, the Dominican Republic and Haiti share many cultural characteristics. Like merengue in the Dominican Republic, mereng (in Haitian Creole; méringue in French) is a national symbol in Haiti. According to Jean Fouchard, Mereng evolved from the fusion of slave musics such as the chica and calenda with ballroom forms related to the French contredance (1988: 5-9). Mereng's name, he says, derives from the mouringue music of the Bara, a Bantu people of Madagascar (1973: 110, 1988: 77-82). That few Malagasies came to the Americas renders this etymology dubious, but it is significant because it foregrounds what Fouchard, and most Haitians, consider the essentially African-derived nature of the music and national identity. Dominican merengue, Fouchard suggests, developed directly from Haitian mereng (1988: 66)."
      Also, according to mentioned that Merengue actually comes from acoustic groups, and in the Dominican Republic, the folklore, is the merengue, and during the 20th century Merengue’s original lead instrument was the guitar. By the 1940s and 1950s it was performed with accordions. On the other hand Burr explains that today, modern Merengue that is heard in nightclubs is epitomized by artist such as Elvis Crespo and Olga Tanon. According to Merengue Tipico originated in the rural Northern Valley region around the city of Santiago. That’s the reason this type of Merengue is known as Merengue Cibaeno. Also Merengue Tipico emphasizes traditional songs dating back as far as the last century. Its performance context and practices differ in their emphasis on close personal relationship between audience, and performers. That’s the reason the genre of Merengue Tipico is more complex than one familiar of merengue. The rhythm of merengue includes of merengue derecho, and merengue apanbichao.

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    • Other dances sometimes placed under the umbrella "ballroom dance" include Nightclub Dances such as Lindy Hop, West Coast Swing, Nightclub Two Step, Hustle, Salsa, and Merengue. from Ballroom dance

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      Nightclub two step Nightclub Two Step (Nightclub Two-step, NC2S, sometimes Disco Two Step or California Two Step) was initially…
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      Nightclub Two Step (Nightclub Two-step, NC2S, sometimes Disco Two Step or California Two Step) was initially developed by Buddy Schwimmer in the mid-1960s. The dance is also known as "Two Step" and was "one of the most popular forms of contemporary social dance" as a Disco Couples Dance in 1978. It is frequently danced to mid-tempo ballads in 4/4 time that have a characteristic Quick-Quick-Slow beat. A classic example is the song Lady In Red.[1]

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    Connects To Nightclub two step

    • Other dances sometimes placed under the umbrella "ballroom dance" include Nightclub Dances such as Lindy Hop, West Coast Swing, Nightclub Two Step, Hustle, Salsa, and Merengue. from Ballroom dance

    1. 33
      Polonaise The polonaise (Polish: polonez) is a dance of Polish origin, in 3/4 time. Its name is French for "Polish."The…
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      The polonaise (Polish: polonez) is a dance of Polish origin, in 3/4 time. Its name is French for "Polish."
      The polonaise had a rhythm quite close to that of the Swedish semiquaver or sixteenth-note polska, and the two dances have a common origin.…

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      The polonaise (Polish: polonez) is a dance of Polish origin, in 3/4 time. Its name is French for "Polish."
      The polonaise had a rhythm quite close to that of the Swedish semiquaver or sixteenth-note polska, and the two dances have a common origin.
      Polonaise is a widespread dance in carnival parties. Polonaise is always a first dance at a studniówka ("hundred-days"), the Polish equivalent of the senior prom that occurs approximately 100 days before exams.

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    • The definition of ballroom dance also depends on the era: balls have featured popular dances of the day such as the Minuet, Quadrille, Polonaise, Polka, Mazurka, and others, which are now considered to be historical dances. from Ballroom dance

    1. 34
      Turnout (ballet) In ballet, turnout (also turn-out) is a rotation of the leg which comes from the hips, causing the knee and foot to…
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      In ballet, turnout (also turn-out) is a rotation of the leg which comes from the hips, causing the knee and foot to turn outward, away from the center of the body. This rotation allows for greater extension of the leg, especially when raising it to the side and rear. Turnout is essential to classical ballet technique and is the basis on which all ballet movement follows.

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    • Ballet technique such as the turned out positions of the feet, however, lingered for over two centuries and past the end of the Victoria era. from Ballroom dance

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      Ball (dance) A ball is a formal dance.Attenders wear evening attire, which is specified on the invitation as black tie or white…
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      A ball is a formal dance.
      Attenders wear evening attire, which is specified on the invitation as black tie or white tie (the most formal)[citation needed]. Social dance forms a large part of the evening; actual ballroom dancing may or may not occur.

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    Connects To Ball (dance)

    • The term 'ballroom dancing' is derived from the word ball, which in turn originates from the Latin word ballare which means 'to dance' (a ball-room being a large room specially designed for such dances). from Ballroom dance

    • Social dance forms a large part of the evening; actual ballroom dancing may or may not occur. from Ball (dance)

    • A ball is a large formal party that features ballroom dancing. from Party

    1. 36
      Mazurka The mazurka (in Polish, mazurek) is a Polish folk dance in triple meter, usually at a lively tempo, and with accent…
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      The mazurka (in Polish, mazurek) is a Polish folk dance in triple meter, usually at a lively tempo, and with accent on the second or third beat.

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    Connects To Mazurka

    • In the 1840s several new dances made their appearance in the ballroom, including the Polka, Mazurka, and the Schottische. from Ballroom dance

    • The definition of ballroom dance also depends on the era: balls have featured popular dances of the day such as the Minuet, Quadrille, Polonaise, Polka, Mazurka, and others, which are now considered to be historical dances. from Ballroom dance

    • In the 19th century, the dance became popular in many ballrooms in different parts of Europe. from Mazurka

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      White tie White tie (or full dress, evening dress, full evening dress; slang top hat and tails or white tie and tails…
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      White tie (or full dress, evening dress, full evening dress; slang top hat and tails or white tie and tails, tailsuit, tails) is the most formal evening dress code in Western fashion. It is worn to ceremonial occasions such as state dinners in some countries, as well as to very formal balls and evening weddings.…

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      White tie (or full dress, evening dress, full evening dress; slang top hat and tails or white tie and tails, tailsuit, tails) is the most formal evening dress code in Western fashion. It is worn to ceremonial occasions such as state dinners in some countries, as well as to very formal balls and evening weddings.
      The chief components for men are:
      While women wear a suitable dress for the occasion, such as a ball gown.
      As evening dress, white tie is traditionally considered correct only after 6:00 p.m. although some etiquette authorities allow for it any time after dark even if that means prior to 6:00 p.m. (though there are some exceptions). The equivalent formal attire for daytime events is called morning dress. The semi-formal evening counterpart of white tie is black tie.

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    • In competitions, competitors are costumed as would be appropriate for a white tie affair, with full gowns for the ladies and bow tie and tail coats for the men; though in American Smooth it is now conventional for the men to abandon the tailsuit in favor of shorter tuxedos, vests, and other creative outfits. from Ballroom dance

    1. 38
      Polka The polka is a Central European dance and also a genre of dance music familiar throughout Europe and the Americas…
    1. 38

      The polka is a Central European dance and also a genre of dance music familiar throughout Europe and the Americas. It originated in the middle of the 19th century in Bohemia. Polka is still a popular genre of folk music in many European countries and is performed by folk artists in Poland (Clarinet Polka), Latvia,…

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      The polka is a Central European dance and also a genre of dance music familiar throughout Europe and the Americas. It originated in the middle of the 19th century in Bohemia. Polka is still a popular genre of folk music in many European countries and is performed by folk artists in Poland (Clarinet Polka), Latvia, Lithuania, Czech Republic, Netherlands, Croatia, Slovenia, Germany, Hungary, Austria, Switzerland, Italy, Ukraine, Belarus, Russia and Slovakia. Local varieties of this dance are also found in the Nordic countries, United Kingdom, France, Ireland, Latin America and in the United States.

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    • In the 1840s several new dances made their appearance in the ballroom, including the Polka, Mazurka, and the Schottische. from Ballroom dance

    • The definition of ballroom dance also depends on the era: balls have featured popular dances of the day such as the Minuet, Quadrille, Polonaise, Polka, Mazurka, and others, which are now considered to be historical dances. from Ballroom dance

    1. 39
      Fred Astaire Fred Astaire (born Frederick Austerlitz; May 10, 1899 – June 22, 1987) was an American dancer, choreographer…
    1. 39

      Fred Astaire (born Frederick Austerlitz; May 10, 1899 – June 22, 1987) was an American dancer, choreographer, singer, musician and actor. His stage and subsequent film and television careers spanned a total of 76 years, during which he made 31 musical films, several award winning television specials, and issued numerous recordings. He was named the…

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      Fred Astaire (born Frederick Austerlitz; May 10, 1899 – June 22, 1987) was an American dancer, choreographer, singer, musician and actor. His stage and subsequent film and television careers spanned a total of 76 years, during which he made 31 musical films, several award winning television specials, and issued numerous recordings. He was named the fifth Greatest Male Star of All Time by the American Film Institute. He is best known as the dancing partner and on-screen romantic interest of Ginger Rogers, with whom he co-starred in a series of ten Hollywood musicals which transformed the genre.
      Gene Kelly, another major innovator in filmed dance, said that "the history of dance on film begins with Astaire". Beyond film and television, many noted dancers and choreographers, including Rudolf Nureyev, Sammy Davis, Jr., Michael Jackson, Gregory Hines, Mikhail Baryshnikov, George Balanchine, Jerome Robbins, and Madhuri Dixit among them, also acknowledged his importance and influence.

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    Connects To Fred Astaire

    • Later, in the 1930s, the on-screen dance pairing of Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers influenced all forms of dance in the USA and elsewhere. from Ballroom dance

    • He drew from a variety of influences, including tap and other black rhythms, classical dance and the elevated style of Vernon and Irene Castle, to create a uniquely recognizable dance style which greatly influenced the American Smooth style of ballroom dance and set standards against which subsequent film dance musicals would be judged. from Fred Astaire

    • Early tappers like Fred Astaire provided a more ballroom look to tap dancing, while Gene Kelly introduced ballet elements and style into tap. from Tap dance

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    • Fred Astaire Dance Studios, Inc. is a ballroom dance franchise chain of studios in the United States and Canada, named after a famous dancer Fred Astaire. from Fred Astaire Dance Studios

    • It was sung in the film by Alice Gentle, Movita Castaneda and Etta Moten and danced by Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers as part of an extended production dance number illustrating the ballroom dance. from Carioca (song)

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    1. 40
      Vintage dance Vintage dance is the authentic recreation of historical dance styles. The term is also used specifically to denote…
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      Vintage dance is the authentic recreation of historical dance styles. The term is also used specifically to denote re-creation of the dances of the English Regency (1795–1820), American Civil War (1860s), Victorian, and Ragtime eras.[citation needed]

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      Vintage dance is the authentic recreation of historical dance styles. The term is also used specifically to denote re-creation of the dances of the English Regency (1795–1820), American Civil War (1860s), Victorian, and Ragtime eras.[citation needed]
      Several Vintage Dance Societies hold balls and events to promote and teach Vintage dances.
      In Massachusetts:
      In California:
      In Colorado:
      In New Jersey:
      In North Carolina:

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    • There are other dances historically accepted as ballroom dances, and are revived via the Vintage dance movement. from Ballroom dance

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      Schottische The schottische is a partnered country dance, that apparently originated in Bohemia. It was popular in Victorian…
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      The schottische is a partnered country dance, that apparently originated in Bohemia. It was popular in Victorian era ballrooms as a part of the Bohemian folk-dance craze and left its traces in folk music of countries such as Argentina ("chotis" and "chamamé"), Finland ("jenkka"), France, Italy, Norway ("reinlender (no)"), Portugal and Brazil (xote, Chotiça (pt)),…

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      The schottische is a partnered country dance, that apparently originated in Bohemia. It was popular in Victorian era ballrooms as a part of the Bohemian folk-dance craze and left its traces in folk music of countries such as Argentina ("chotis" and "chamamé"), Finland ("jenkka"), France, Italy, Norway ("reinlender (no)"), Portugal and Brazil (xote, Chotiça (pt)), Spain (chotis), Sweden, Denmark ("schottis"), and the United States, among other nations. The schottische is considered by The Oxford Companion to Music to be a kind of slower polka, with continental-European origin.
      The schottische basic step is made up of two sidesteps to the left and right, followed by a turn in four steps. In some countries, the sidesteps and turn are replaced by Strathspey hopping steps.
      Schottisches danced in Europe (in the context of a bal folk), where they originated, are different from how they are danced in the United States. The European (or Continental) version (often called "skoteesh"), is typically danced to faster music and is quite restrained in its movements. The American version is often large and open, with the first part expressed equally as promenades, individual or led twirls or similar moves, and the second part most often expressed as a close pivot. It seems to be mostly referred to as a "shodish".

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    • In the 1840s several new dances made their appearance in the ballroom, including the Polka, Mazurka, and the Schottische. from Ballroom dance

    1. 42
      Positions of the feet in ballet The positions of the feet in ballet is a fundamental part of classical ballet technique that defines standard…
    1. 42

      The positions of the feet in ballet is a fundamental part of classical ballet technique that defines standard placements of feet on the floor. There are five basic positions in modern-day classical ballet, known as the first through fifth positions. These five positions were codified by French choreographer and dancer Pierre Beauchamp in the late…

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      The positions of the feet in ballet is a fundamental part of classical ballet technique that defines standard placements of feet on the floor. There are five basic positions in modern-day classical ballet, known as the first through fifth positions. These five positions were codified by French choreographer and dancer Pierre Beauchamp in the late 17th century. Two additional positions, known as the sixth and seventh positions, were codified by Serge Lifar in the 1930s while serving as Ballet Master at the Paris Opéra Ballet, though their use is limited to Lifar's choreographies. The sixth and seventh positions were not Lifar's inventions, but revivals of positions that already existed in the eighteenth century, when there were ten positions of the feet in classical ballet.

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    Connects To Positions of the feet in ballet

    • Toward the latter half of the 17th century, Louis XIV founded his 'Académie Royale de Musique et de Danse', where specific rules for the execution of every dance and the "five positions" of the feet were formulated for the first time by members of the Académie. from Ballroom dance

    1. 43
      Quadrille Quadrille is a historic dance performed by four couples in a rectangular formation, and a precursor to traditional…
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      Quadrille is a historic dance performed by four couples in a rectangular formation, and a precursor to traditional square dancing. It is also a style of music. A derivative found in the Francophone Lesser Antilles is known in the local Creole as kwadril.…

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      Quadrille is a historic dance performed by four couples in a rectangular formation, and a precursor to traditional square dancing. It is also a style of music. A derivative found in the Francophone Lesser Antilles is known in the local Creole as kwadril.
      It is fashionable late 18th- and 19th-century for four couples in square formation. Imported by English aristocrats in 1815 from elite Parisian ballrooms, it consisted of four, or sometimes five, contredanses. The quadrille was frequently danced to a medley of opera melodies. The lancers, a variation of the quadrille, became popular in the late 1800s and was still danced in the mid-20th century in folk-dance clubs.

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    • The definition of ballroom dance also depends on the era: balls have featured popular dances of the day such as the Minuet, Quadrille, Polonaise, Polka, Mazurka, and others, which are now considered to be historical dances. from Ballroom dance

    • Music was provided from bandstands (known as ‘’orchestras’’) or more permanent buildings, and was generally of the popular variety: ballroom dances, quadrilles ( s), cornet solos etc. from Promenade concert

    1. 44
      Basse danse The basse danse, or "low dance", was the most popular court dance in the 15th and early 16th centuries, especially…
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      The basse danse, or "low dance", was the most popular court dance in the 15th and early 16th centuries, especially at the Burgundian court, often in a combination of 6/4 and 3/2 time allowing for use of hemiola. The word basse describes the nature of the dance, in which partners move quietly and gracefully in…

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      The basse danse, or "low dance", was the most popular court dance in the 15th and early 16th centuries, especially at the Burgundian court, often in a combination of 6/4 and 3/2 time allowing for use of hemiola. The word basse describes the nature of the dance, in which partners move quietly and gracefully in a slow gliding or walking motion without leaving the floor, and contrasts with livelier dances in which both feet left the floor in jumps or leaps. The basse danse later led to the development of the pavane. The latter half of a basse danse consisted occasionally of a tourdion, due to their contrasting tempi, and both were danced alongside the Pavane and galliard, and the allemande and courante, also in pairs. The earliest record of a basse danse dates to the 1320s and is found in an Occitan poem of Raimon de Cornet, who notes that the joglars performed them.
      Monophonic songs were based on a tenor cantus firmus; the length of the choreography was often derived from popular chansons. In performance, 3 or 4 instrumentalists would improvise the polyphony based on this tenor. In others, multiple parts were written, though in the style of the day choices regarding instrumentation were left to the performers. Most famous, perhaps, are the basse danses assembled in 1530 by Pierre Attaingnant that remain today in "The Attaingnant Dance Prints", which included parts for four voices which were typically improvised upon by adding melodic embellishment (as Attaingnant rarely included such ornamentation, with occasional exceptions such as "Pavin of Albart", an embellishment upon "Pavane 'Si je m'en vois'"). Basse danses from this collection have been revisited and recorded by various ensembles including the Josef Ulsamer & Ulsamer Collegium. Most basse danses consisted of a binary form with each section repeated, such as the "No. 1: Basse Danse" from the publication "Danseries a 4 parties" by Pierre Attaingnant, published in 1547.

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    • Among the dances described were the solemn basse danse, the livelier branle, pavane, and the galliarde which Shakespeare called the "cinq pace" as it was made of five steps. from Ballroom dance

    1. 45
      Branle A branle (pronounced bran(ə)l)—also bransle, brangle, brawl, brawle, brall(e), braul(e), or (Scot.) brantle…
    1. 45

      A branle (pronounced bran(ə)l)—also bransle, brangle, brawl, brawle, brall(e), braul(e), or (Scot.) brantle (OED)—or brainle[citation needed]—is a 16th-century French dance style which moves mainly from side to side, and is performed by couples in either a line or a circle.…

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      A branle (pronounced bran(ə)l)—also bransle, brangle, brawl, brawle, brall(e), braul(e), or (Scot.) brantle (OED)—or brainle[citation needed]—is a 16th-century French dance style which moves mainly from side to side, and is performed by couples in either a line or a circle.
      The word is derived from the French verb branler (to shake), possibly related to brander (to brandish). In Italy the branle became the brando, and in Spain the bran (Dolmetsch 1959,[page needed]). Brando alta regina by Cesare Negri demonstrates how widely the French and Italian dances had diverged by the beginning of the 17th century.[citation needed] The Branle seems to have travelled to Scotland and survived for some time as the brail, but in England it was rarely danced, and of thousands of lute pieces from England only 18 were called branle, though one called "courant" is known from continental sources as a branle (Craig-McFeely 1994, chapter 2, note 22).
      The only detailed sources for the dance steps to the French branles are Orchesography (1589) by Thoinot Arbeau and a few late examples in Beauchamp-Feuillet notation (invented in 1691), such as Danses nouvelles presentees au Roy (c. 1715) by Louis-Guillaume Pécour. However, Antonius de Arena briefly described the steps for the double and single branles and mentions mixed branles (branlos decopatos) in his macaronic treatise Ad suos compagnones (Arena 1986 [1529], 20–21), and the dialogue of act 4, scene 2 of John Marston's The Malcontent (1604) sketches a choreography for one branle. Before 1500 the word is encountered, but only as the name of one of the steps of the basse danse (Heartz 2001). Arbeau strongly implies that the branle was a dance mainly performed by commoners.[citation needed]

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    • Among the dances described were the solemn basse danse, the livelier branle, pavane, and the galliarde which Shakespeare called the "cinq pace" as it was made of five steps. from Ballroom dance

    1. 46
      Thoinot Arbeau Thoinot Arbeau is the anagrammatic pen name of French cleric Jehan Tabourot (March 17, 1519 - July 23, 1595)…
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      Thoinot Arbeau is the anagrammatic pen name of French cleric Jehan Tabourot (March 17, 1519 - July 23, 1595). Tabourot is most famous for his Orchésographie, a study of late sixteenth-century French Renaissance social dance. He was born in Dijon and died in Langres.

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    Connects To Thoinot Arbeau

    • The first authoritative knowledge of the earliest ballroom dances was recorded toward the end of the 16th century, when Jehan Tabourot, under the pen name "Thoinot-Arbeau", published in 1588 his Orchésographie, a study of late 16th-century French renaissance social dance. from Ballroom dance

    1. 47
      Discofox Discofox or disco fox is a social partner dance which evolved in Europe in the mid-1970s as a rediscovery of the…
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      Discofox or disco fox is a social partner dance which evolved in Europe in the mid-1970s as a rediscovery of the dance hold in the improvisational disco dance scene dominated by solo dancing, approximately at the same time when the hustle emerged in the United States. Both dances were greatly influenced by Saturday Night Fever starring John Travolta. In various regions, it is also known under different names: disco hustle, swing fox, disco swing, and rock fox.…

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      Discofox or disco fox is a social partner dance which evolved in Europe in the mid-1970s as a rediscovery of the dance hold in the improvisational disco dance scene dominated by solo dancing, approximately at the same time when the hustle emerged in the United States. Both dances were greatly influenced by Saturday Night Fever starring John Travolta. In various regions, it is also known under different names: disco hustle, swing fox, disco swing, and rock fox.
      Discofox is very popular in Germany and Switzerland.
      The set of figures is influenced by various dances: foxtrot, swing, salsa, etc., adapted to the musical style and basic step of the dance. Moreover, various fusion styles emerged, such as sals-discofox and disco cha.
      Discofox may be danced to a wide variety of 2/4 and 4/4 music such as 70s disco, 80s Eurodisco, Italo disco, disco polo, pop and techno. Tempo may vary. In a social setting it is mostly danced in one place, although the couple may also move across the dance floor. It is danced with various types of single and double handhold. Among the figures are various handwraps, spins, throw-outs/catches, poses, drops, and for competitions also acrobatic figures.
      There are international competitions in discofox.

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    Connects To Discofox

    • In Europe, Latin Swing dances include Argentine Tango, Mambo, Lindy Hop, Swing Boogie (sometimes also known as Nostalgic Boogie), and Disco Fox. from Ballroom dance

    1. 48
      Tailcoat A tailcoat is a coat with the front of the skirt cut away, so as to leave only the rear section of the skirt, known…
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      A tailcoat is a coat with the front of the skirt cut away, so as to leave only the rear section of the skirt, known as the tails. The historical reason coats were cut this way was to make it easier for the wearer to ride a horse, but over the years tailcoats of varying…

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      A tailcoat is a coat with the front of the skirt cut away, so as to leave only the rear section of the skirt, known as the tails. The historical reason coats were cut this way was to make it easier for the wearer to ride a horse, but over the years tailcoats of varying types have evolved into forms of formal dress for both day and evening wear. Although there are several different types of tailcoat, the term tailcoat is popularly taken to be synonymous with the type of dress coat still worn today in the evening with white tie.
      This dress coat, one of the two main surviving tailcoats, is a dark evening coat with a squarely cut away front. The other one is the morning coat (or cutaway in American English), which is cut away at the front in a gradual taper.

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    Connects To Tailcoat

    • In competitions, competitors are costumed as would be appropriate for a white tie affair, with full gowns for the ladies and bow tie and tail coats for the men; though in American Smooth it is now conventional for the men to abandon the tailsuit in favor of shorter tuxedos, vests, and other creative outfits. from Ballroom dance

    • Ball gown and tailcoat are always worn when dancing competitively. Viennese Waltz ( ) is the genre of a ballroom dance. from Viennese Waltz

    1. 49
      Minuet A minuet (/ˌmɪnjuːˈɛt/; also spelled menuet), is a social dance of French origin for two people, usually in 3/4…
    1. 49

      A minuet (/ˌmɪnjuːˈɛt/; also spelled menuet), is a social dance of French origin for two people, usually in 3/4 time. The word was adapted from Italian minuetto and French menuet, and may have been from French menu meaning slender, small, referring to the very small steps, or from the early 17th-century popular group dances called branle à mener or amener.…

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      A minuet (/ˌmɪnjuːˈɛt/; also spelled menuet), is a social dance of French origin for two people, usually in 3/4 time. The word was adapted from Italian minuetto and French menuet, and may have been from French menu meaning slender, small, referring to the very small steps, or from the early 17th-century popular group dances called branle à mener or amener.
      The term also describes the musical form which accompanied the dance, and subsequently developed more fully, often with a longer structure called the minuet and trio.

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    • In 1650 the Minuet, originally a peasant dance of Poitou, was introduced into Paris and set to music by Jean-Baptiste Lully and danced by the King Louis XIV in public, and would continue to dominate ballroom from that time until the close of the 18th century. from Ballroom dance

    • The definition of ballroom dance also depends on the era: balls have featured popular dances of the day such as the Minuet, Quadrille, Polonaise, Polka, Mazurka, and others, which are now considered to be historical dances. from Ballroom dance

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      Ginger Rogers Ginger Rogers (born Virginia Katherine McMath; July 16, 1911 – April 25, 1995) was an American actress, dancer and…
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      Ginger Rogers (born Virginia Katherine McMath; July 16, 1911 – April 25, 1995) was an American actress, dancer and singer who appeared in films, and on stage, radio, and television throughout much of the 20th century.…

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      Ginger Rogers (born Virginia Katherine McMath; July 16, 1911 – April 25, 1995) was an American actress, dancer and singer who appeared in films, and on stage, radio, and television throughout much of the 20th century.
      During her long career, she made 73 films, collaborating with Fred Astaire as a romantic lead actress and dancing partner in a series of ten Hollywood musical films that revolutionized the genre. She achieved great success on her own in a variety of film roles and won the Academy Award for Best Actress for her performance in Kitty Foyle (1940). She ranks #14 on the AFI's 100 Years...100 Stars list of actress screen legends.

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    How Ballroom dance
    Connects To Ginger Rogers

    • Later, in the 1930s, the on-screen dance pairing of Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers influenced all forms of dance in the USA and elsewhere. from Ballroom dance

    • It was sung in the film by Alice Gentle, Movita Castaneda and Etta Moten and danced by Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers as part of an extended production dance number illustrating the ballroom dance. from Carioca (song)

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