Charles Dodgson (1800 – 21 June 1868) was an Anglican cleric, scholar and author. He was the father of Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, better known as Lewis Carroll.
In 1843 Dodgson was given the Crown living of Croft, Yorkshire, by the Prime Minister, Sir Robert Peel, at the urging of Bishop Longley. In 1852 he was additionally collated as a canon of Ripon Cathedral and in 1854 became the Archdeacon of Richmond. At Croft he restored the chancel of St Peter's Church and once again started a school, sacrificing part of the glebe to it. He taught there, as did his wife and later some of his children.

Charles Dodgson (1800 – 21 June 1868) was an Anglican cleric, scholar and author. He was the father of Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, better known as Lewis Carroll.
Charles Dodgson was born in 1800 in Hamilton, Lanarkshire, the son of Captain Charles Dodgson and grandson of the Rt Revd Charles Dodgson, Bishop of Elphin. He was educated at Westminster School and Christ Church, Oxford, where he graduated in 1821 with a double first in mathematics and classics.

He was elected a Student of Christ Church and taught mathematics there until 1827.
In 1827, Dodgson married his cousin, Frances Jane "Fanny" Lutwidge and was thereby required to give up his college position. He was appointed to a college living as Perpetual Curate of All Saints' Church, Daresbury. Ten of their eleven children, including Charles Lutwidge, were born here. The living was not a wealthy one and Dodgson ran a school in the village to supplement his income. In 1836 he was additionally appointed Examining Chaplain to Charles Longley, the newly created Bishop of Ripon. During this period he and his wife educated all their children at home.
The headmaster of Warrington School, Thomas Vere Bayne, who had studied at Jesus College, Oxford, and who was a friend of Dodgson, used to walk over to visit Daresbury on Sundays, sometimes helping with the church services. Bayne would bring his son Vere, who became a lifelong friend of the young Charles Lutwidge. Other friends and visitors included the Revd Richard Durnford, Rector of Middleton, Lancashire; Lord Francis Egerton, Member of Parliament for South Lancashire and John Wilson Patten, MP for North Lancashire.
Dodgson was concerned about the canal workers on the Bridgewater Canal running past his parish. Together with Lord Egerton, who was a wealthy local landowner, he converted a barge into a floating chapel, moored at Preston Brook, and held weekly services there for the bargees.
In 1843 Dodgson was given the Crown living of Croft, Yorkshire, by the Prime Minister, Sir Robert Peel, at the urging of Bishop Longley. In 1852 he was additionally collated as a canon of Ripon Cathedral and in 1854 became the Archdeacon of Richmond. At Croft he restored the chancel of St Peter's Church and once again started a school, sacrificing part of the glebe to it. He taught there, as did his wife and later some of his children.
Dodgson was a contemporary and college friend of Edward Bouverie Pusey, a leader of the Oxford Movement. Dodgson was a "Puseyite" and contributed the volume on Tertullian to Pusey's series Library of the Fathers. All told he wrote twenty-four books on theology and religious subjects.
Dodgson's wife died on 26 January 1851 and he died on 21 June 1868.

FULL ARTICLE
  • 1. [All Saints' Church, Daresbury] All Saints' Church, Daresbury, is in the village of Daresbury, Cheshire, England. It is known for its association with Lewis Carroll who is commemorated in its stained glass windows depicting characters from Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. It is designated by English Heritage as a Grade II* listed building. The church is an active Anglican parish
  • 2. [Sir Thomas Boteler Church of England High School] Sir Thomas Boteler Church of England High School is a comprehensive school in Warrington, Cheshire.
  • 3. [Croft-on-Tees] Croft-on-Tees is a village and civil parish in the Richmondshire district of North Yorkshire, England. It has also been known as Croft Spa, and from which the former Croft Spa railway station took its name. It lies 11 miles (18 km) north-north west of the county town of Northallerton.
  • 4. [Preston Brook] Preston Brook is a civil parish in the borough of Halton, a unitary authority in the ceremonial county of Cheshire. It is located to the south-east of Runcorn and is adjacent to the M56 motorway. It contains the villages of Preston Brook and Preston on the Hill.
  • 5. [John Wilson-Patten, 1st Baron Winmarleigh] John Wilson-Patten, 1st Baron Winmarleigh PC (26 April 1802 – 11 July 1892) was a British Conservative politician.
  • 6. [Archdeacon of Richmond and Craven] The Archdeacon of Richmond and Craven is an archdiaconal post in the Church of England. It is under the jurisdiction of the Diocese of Leeds (until 1836 it was part of the Diocese of Chester, and from 1836 until 2014 in the Diocese of Ripon). It is divided into seven rural deaneries: Bowland, Ewecross, Harrogate, Richmond, Ripon, Skipton, and Wensley.
  • 7. [Richard Durnford] The Rt Rev Richard Durnford (3 November 1802 – 14 October 1895) was the Bishop of Chichester from 1870 to 1895.
    He was born in Newbury, Berkshire, into an ecclesiastical family (his father was also named Rev. Richard Dunford). He was educated at Eton and Magdalen College, Oxford, and ordained in 1831. From 1833 he was
  • 8. [Middleton, Lancashire] Middleton is a village and civil parish within the City of Lancaster in Lancashire, England, between Heysham and Overton. It had a population of 521 recorded in the 2001 census.
  • 9. [North Lancashire (UK Parliament constituency)] North Lancashire was a county constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It was represented by two Members of Parliament. The constituency was created by the Great Reform Act of 1832 by the splitting of Lancashire constituency into Northern and Southern divisions.
  • 10. [South Lancashire (UK Parliament constituency)] South Lancashire, formally called the Southern Division of Lancashire or Lancashire Southern, is a former county constituency in England. It returned two Members of Parliament (MPs) to the British House of Commons from 1832 to 1861, and then three until the constituency was divided in 1868.
  • 11. [Bishop of Elphin] The Bishop of Elphin is an episcopal title which takes its name after the village of Elphin, County Roscommon, Ireland. In the Roman Catholic Church it remains a separate title, but in the Church of Ireland it has been united with other bishoprics.
  • 12. [Bishop of Ripon] The Bishop of Ripon is an episcopal title which takes its name after the city of Ripon in North Yorkshire, England. The bishop is one of the area bishops of the Diocese of West Yorkshire and the Dales (also known as the Diocese of Leeds) in the Province of York. The area bishop of Ripon
  • 13. [Charles Longley] Charles Thomas Longley (28 July 1794 – 27 October 1868) was a bishop in the Church of England. He served as Bishop of Ripon, Bishop of Durham, Archbishop of York and Archbishop of Canterbury from 1862 until his death.
  • 14. [Anglican ministry] The Anglican ministry is both the leadership and agency of Christian service in the Anglican Communion. "Ministry" commonly refers to the office of ordained clergy: the threefold order of bishops, priests and deacons. More accurately, Anglican ministry includes many laypeople who devote themselves to the ministry of the church. Ultimately, all baptized members of the
  • 15. [Perpetual curate] Perpetual Curate was a class of resident parish priest or incumbent curate within the United Church of England and Ireland. The name is found in common use mainly during the first half of the nineteenth century. The legal status of perpetual curate originated as an administrative anomaly in the 16th Century. Unlike ancient rectories and
  • 16. [Francis Egerton, 1st Earl of Ellesmere] Francis Egerton, 1st Earl of Ellesmere KG, PC (1 January 1800 – 18 February 1857), known as Lord Francis Leveson-Gower until 1833, was a British politician, writer, traveller and patron of the arts. Ellesmere Island, a major island (10th in size among global islands) in Nunavut, the Canadian Arctic, was named after him.
  • 17. [Edward Bouverie Pusey] Edward Bouverie Pusey (/ˈpjuːzi/; 22 August 1800 – 16 September 1882) was an English churchman, for more than fifty years Regius Professor of Hebrew at Christ Church, Oxford. He was one of the leaders of the Oxford Movement.
  • 18. [Bridgewater Canal] The Bridgewater Canal connects Runcorn, Manchester and Leigh, in North West England. It was commissioned by Francis Egerton, 3rd Duke of Bridgewater, to transport coal from his mines in Worsley to Manchester. It was opened in 1761 from Worsley to Manchester, and later extended from Manchester to Runcorn, and then from Worsley to Leigh.
  • 19. [Ripon Cathedral] Ripon Cathedral is a seat of the Bishop of Leeds and one of three co-equal mother churches of the Diocese of Leeds, situated in the small North Yorkshire city of Ripon, England.
  • 20. [Lewis Carroll] Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (/ˈtʃɑrlz ˈlʌtwɪdʒ ˈdɒdʒsən/; 27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by his pen name, Lewis Carroll (/ˈkærəl/), was an English writer, mathematician, logician, Anglican deacon and photographer. His most famous writings are Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, its sequel Through the Looking-Glass, which includes the poem Jabberwocky, and the poem The
  • 21. [Oxford Movement] The Oxford Movement was a movement of High Church Anglicans, eventually developing into Anglo-Catholicism. The movement, whose members were often associated with the University of Oxford, argued for the reinstatement of lost Christian traditions of faith and their inclusion into Anglican liturgy and theology. They conceived of the Anglican Church as one of three branches of the One, Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic Church.
  • 22. [Jesus College, Oxford] Jesus College (in full: Jesus College in the University of Oxford of Queen Elizabeth's Foundation) is one of the colleges of the University of Oxford in England. It is in the centre of the city, on a site between Turl Street, Ship Street, Cornmarket Street and Market Street. The college was founded by Elizabeth I
  • 23. [Hamilton, South Lanarkshire] Hamilton (Scots: Hamiltoun, Scottish Gaelic: Hamilton) is a town in South Lanarkshire, in the west-central Lowlands of Scotland. It serves as the main administrative centre of the South Lanarkshire council area. It is the fourth-biggest town (and eighth-biggest place including cities) in Scotland. It sits 12 miles (19 km) south-east of Glasgow, 35 miles (56
  • 24. [Westminster School] The Royal College of St. Peter in Westminster, better known as Westminster School and standing in the precincts of Westminster Abbey in London, is one of Britain's leading independent schools, with the highest Oxford and Cambridge acceptance rates of any secondary school or college in Britain. With a history going back to the 11th century,
  • 25. [Christ Church, Oxford] Christ Church (Latin: Ædes Christi, the temple or house (ædēs) of Christ, and thus sometimes known as The House), is a constituent college of the University of Oxford in England. The college is associated with Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford, which serves as the college chapel and whose dean is ex officio the college head.
  • 26. [Benefice] A benefice /ˈbɛnɪfɪs/ is a reward received in exchange for services rendered and as a retainer for future services. The Roman Empire used the Latin term beneficium as a benefit to an individual from the Empire for services rendered. Its use was adopted by the western church in the Carolingian Era as a benefit bestowed
  • 27. [Robert Peel] Sir Robert Peel, 2nd Baronet (5 February 1788 – 2 July 1850) was a British Conservative statesman, who twice served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 10 December 1834 to 8 April 1835, and again from 30 August 1841 to 29 June 1846. The son of a wealthy textile manufacturer, he served in
  • 28. [Canon (priest)] A canon (from the Latin canonicus, itself derived from the Greek κανονικός, kanonikós, "relating to a rule", "regular") is a member of certain bodies subject to an ecclesiastical rule.
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