The Landshut Wedding (German: Landshuter Hochzeit) is one of the largest historical pageants in Europe. Countless visitors from all over the world have taken part, or have been spectators of the "Landshuter Hochzeit 1475", a pageant held in Landshut, Bavaria (Germany). More than 2,000 participants in medieval costumes bring the festival to life to recreate the Late Middle Ages. It commemorates the wedding between Hedwig, the Polish King's daughter, and George, the son of the Duke of Bavaria at Landshut.

The original medieval wedding is re-enacted every four years, and everyone gets carried away with medieval jousting, pageantry, feasting and wedding processions for a short period in the summer.

  • 1. [Hedwig Jagiellon, Duchess of Bavaria] Hedwig Jagiellon (Polish: Jadwiga Jagiellonka, Lithuanian: Jadvyga Jogailaitė, German: Hedwig Jagiellonica) (21 September 1457 – 18 February 1502), baptized as "Hedwigis", was a Polish princess member of the Jagiellonian dynasty and by marriage Duchess of Bavaria.
  • 2. [St. Martin's Church, Landshut] The Church of St. Martin in Landshut is a medieval church in that German city. St. Martin's Church, along with Trausnitz Castle and the celebration of the Landshuter Hochzeit (wedding), are the most important landmarks and historical events of Landshut. This Brick Gothic landmark is the tallest church in Bavaria, and the tallest brick building
  • 3. [George, Duke of Bavaria] George of Bavaria referred to as the Rich (15 August 1455, Burghausen, Bavaria – 1 December 1503 Ingolstadt), (German: Georg , Herzog von Bayern-Landshut) was the last Duke of Bavaria-Landshut. He was a son of Louis IX the Rich and Amalia of Saxony.
  • 4. [Landshut Residence] The Landshut Residence (German:Stadtresidenz Landshut) is a palace in Landshut, Lower Bavaria.
  • 5. [Medieval pageant] A medieval pageant is a form of procession traditionally associated with both secular and religious rituals, often with a narrative structure. Pageantry was an important aspect of medieval European seasonal festivals, in particular around the celebration of Corpus Christi, which began after the thirteenth century. This festival reenacted the entire history of the world, in
  • 6. [Growth of the Ottoman Empire] The Growth of the Ottoman Empire (1453–1683) is when the Ottoman state reached the Pax Ottomana. The period had two main era; "expansion and apogee" (1453–1566) and "revolts and revival" (1566–1683) In this period, the Ottoman Empire expanded southwestwards into North Africa and battled with the re-emergent Persian Shi'ia Safavid Empire to the east.
  • 7. [Landshut] Landshut (Bavarian: Landshuad) is a town in Bavaria in the south-east of Germany, belonging to both Eastern and Southern Bavaria. Situated on the banks of the River Isar, Landshut is the capital of Lower Bavaria, one of the seven administrative regions of the Free State of Bavaria. It is also the seat of the surrounding
  • 8. [Casimir IV Jagiellon] Casimir IV KG (Polish: Kazimierz IV Andrzej Jagiellończyk [kaˈʑimi̯ɛʒ jaɡi̯ɛlˈlɔɲt͡ʃɨk]; Lithuanian: Kazimieras Jogailaitis; 30 November 1427 – 7 June 1492) of the Jagiellonian dynasty was Grand Duke of Lithuania from 1440, and King of Poland from 1447, until his death. He was one of the most active Polish rulers, under whom Poland, by defeating the
  • 9. [Pierre de la Rue] Pierre de la Rue (c. 1452 – 20 November 1518) was a Franco-Flemish composer and singer of the Renaissance. His name also appears as Piersson or variants of Pierchon and his toponymic, when present, as various forms of de Platea, de Robore, or de Vico. A member of the same generation as Josquin des
  • 10. [Fire eating] Fire eating is the act of putting a flaming object into the mouth and extinguishing it. A fire eater can be an entertainer, a street performer, part of a sideshow or a circus act but has also been part of spiritual tradition in India. Fire eating torches are generally made of metal with a wrapped kevlar or cotton wick.
  • 11. [Living history] Living history is an activity that incorporates historical tools, activities and dress into an interactive presentation that seeks to give observers and participants a sense of stepping back in time. Although it does not necessarily seek to reenact a specific event in history, living history is similar to, and sometimes incorporates, historical reenactment. Living history
  • 12. [Guillaume Dufay] Guillaume Dufay (French: [dyfa(j)i]; also Du Fay, Du Fayt; 5 August, c. 1397 – 27 November 1474) was a Franco-Flemish composer of the early Renaissance. The central figure in the Burgundian School, he was regarded by his contemporaries as the leading composer in Europe in the mid-15th century.
  • 13. [Archbishopric of Salzburg] The Archbishopric of Salzburg was a Prince-Bishopric and state of the Holy Roman Empire. The diocese arose from St Peter's Abbey, founded in the German stem duchy of Bavaria about 696 by Saint Rupert at the former Roman city of Iuvavum (Salzburg).
  • 14. [Bride price] Bride price, also known as bride token, is an amount of money, property or other form of wealth paid by a groom or his family to the parents of the woman he has just married or is just about to marry. Bride price can be compared to dowry, which is paid to the groom, or
  • 15. [Guilder] Guilder is the English translation of the Dutch and German gulden, originally shortened from Middle High German guldin pfenninc "gold penny". This was the term that became current in the southern and western parts of the Holy Roman Empire for the Fiorino d'oro (introduced 1252). Hence, the name has often been interchangeable with florin (currency sign ƒ. or ƒl.).
  • 16. [Josquin des Prez] Josquin des Prez (French: [ʒɔskɛ̃ depʁe]; c. 1450/1455 – 27 August 1521), often referred to simply as Josquin, was a Franco-Flemish composer of the Renaissance. His original name is sometimes given as Josquin Lebloitte and his later name is given under a wide variety of spellings in French, Italian, and Latin, including Iosquinus Pratensis and
  • 17. [Jousting] Jousting is a martial game or hastilude between two horsemen wielding lances with a blunted tips, often as part of a tournament. The primary aim was to replicate a clash of heavy cavalry, with each opponent endeavoring to strike the opponent while riding towards him at high speed, if possible breaking the lance on the
  • 18. [German Reich] Deutsches Reich (German: [ˈdɔʏtʃəs ˈʀaɪç]) was the official name for the German nation state from 1871 to 1943 in German language. It translates literally to "German Empire", with a context approximating that of "German Realm". From 1943 to 1945, the official name was – but not formally proclaimed – Großdeutsches Reich ("Greater German Reich") on account of the new territories annexed into the state's administration during the Second World War.
  • 19. [Acrobatics] Acrobatics (from Greek ἀκροβατέω akrobateō, "walk on tiptoe, strut") is the performance of extraordinary feats of balance, agility, and motor coordination. It can be found in many of the performing arts, sports (sporting) events, and martial arts. Acrobatics is most often associated with activities that make extensive use of gymnastic elements, such as acro dance,
  • 20. [Fall of Constantinople] The Fall of Constantinople (Greek: Άλωση της Κωνσταντινούπολης, Alōsē tēs Kōnstantinoupolēs; Turkish: İstanbul'un Fethi Conquest of Istanbul) was the capture of the capital of the Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empire by an invading army of the Ottoman Empire on Wednesday, 29 May 1453. The Ottomans were commanded by 21-year-old Ottoman Sultan Mehmed II, who defeated an
  • 21. [Late Middle Ages] The Late Middle Ages or Late Medieval Period was the period of European history generally comprising the 14th and 15th centuries (c. 1301–1500). The Late Middle Ages followed the High Middle Ages and preceded the onset of the early modern era (and, in much of Europe, the Renaissance).
  • 22. [Bavaria] The Free State of Bavaria (/bəˈvɛəriə/; German: Freistaat Bayern, pronounced [ˈfʁaɪʃtaːt ˈbaɪ.ɐn], Alemannic German: Freistaat Bayre, Bavarian: Freistood Boajan/Baijaan, Main-Franconian: Freischdood Bayan; Czech: Bavorsko) is a federal state of Germany. In the southeast of the country with an area of 70,548 square kilometres (27,200 sq mi), it is the largest state, making up almost a
  • 23. [Black Death] The Black Death was one of the most devastating pandemics in human history, resulting in the deaths of an estimated 75 to 200 million people and peaking in Europe in the years 1346–53. Although there were several competing theories as to the etiology of the Black Death, analysis of DNA from victims in northern and
  • 24. [Kraków] Kraków (Polish pronunciation: [ˈkrakuf]  listen ), also Cracow or Krakow (US English /ˈkrɑːk/, UK English /ˈkrækɒv/), is the second largest and one of the oldest cities in Poland. Situated on the Vistula River (Polish: Wisła) in the Lesser Poland region, the city dates back to the 7th century. Kraków has traditionally been one of the
  • 25. [Ottoman Empire] The Ottoman Empire (/ˈɒtəmən/; Ottoman Turkish: دَوْلَتِ عَلِيّهٔ عُثمَانِیّهDevlet-i Aliyye-i Osmâniyye, Modern Turkish: Osmanlı İmparatorluğu or Osmanlı Devleti), also known as the Turkish Empire, Ottoman Turkey or Turkey, was an empire founded in 1299 by Oghuz Turks under Osman I in northwestern Anatolia. After conquests in the Balkans by Murad I between 1362 and
  • 26. [Germany] Germany (/ˈɜrməni/; German: Deutschland [ˈdɔʏtʃlant]), officially the Federal Republic of Germany (German: Bundesrepublik Deutschland,  listen ), is a federal parliamentary republic in western-central Europe. It includes 16 constituent states and covers an area of 357,021 square kilometres (137,847 sq mi) with a largely temperate seasonal climate. Its capital and largest city is Berlin. With 81
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