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The Landshut Wedding (German: Landshuter Hochzeit) is one of the largest historical pageants in Europe. Countless visitors from all over the world have taken part, or have been spectators of the "Landshuter Hochzeit 1475", a pageant held in Landshut, Bavaria (Germany). More than 2,000 participants in medieval costumes bring the festival to life to recreate the Late Middle Ages. It commemorates the wedding between Hedwig, the Polish King's daughter, and George, the son of the Duke of Landshut.

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The original medieval wedding is re-enacted every four years, and everyone gets carried away with medieval jousting, pageantry, feasting and wedding processions for a short period in the summer.

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      Hedwig Jagiellon, Duchess of Bavaria Hedwig Jagiellon (Polish: Jadwiga Jagiellonka, Lithuanian: Jadvyga Jogailaitė, German: Hedwig Jagiellonica) (21…
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      Hedwig Jagiellon (Polish: Jadwiga Jagiellonka, Lithuanian: Jadvyga Jogailaitė, German: Hedwig Jagiellonica) (21 September 1457 – 18 February 1502), baptized as "Hedwigis", was the eldest daughter of King Casimir IV Jagiellon of Poland and Archduchess Elisabeth Habsburg of Hungary.…

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      Hedwig Jagiellon (Polish: Jadwiga Jagiellonka, Lithuanian: Jadvyga Jogailaitė, German: Hedwig Jagiellonica) (21 September 1457 – 18 February 1502), baptized as "Hedwigis", was the eldest daughter of King Casimir IV Jagiellon of Poland and Archduchess Elisabeth Habsburg of Hungary.
      In 14 November 1475 Hedwig married Duke George of Bavaria in Landshut, which started the tradition of the famous medieval pageant Landshut Wedding.
      It was rumored that she was locked away in a tower in Burg Trausnitz right after the wedding, however historic literature proves that she lived a normal life as a Lady of the house. Hedwig gave birth to five children of which only two daughters survived childhood years. Not much is reported after that.

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    How Landshut Wedding
    Connects To Hedwig Jagiellon, Duchess of Bavaria

    • In 14 November 1475 Hedwig married Duke George of Bavaria in Landshut, which started the tradition of the famous medieval pageant Landshut Wedding. from Hedwig Jagiellon, Duchess of Bavaria

    • The festival is held in memory of the wedding between George of Bavaria, the son of the Bavarian duke, and Hedwig Jagiellon, daughter of King Casimir IV Jagiellon of Poland, in 1475. from Landshut Wedding

    • It commemorates the wedding between Hedwig, the Polish King's daughter, and George, the son of the Duke of Landshut. from Landshut Wedding

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    • His wedding with the princess Hedwig Jagiellon, a daughter of King Casimir IV of Poland, in 1475 was celebrated in the Landshut Wedding with one of the most splendid festivals of the Middle Age. from George, Duke of Bavaria

    • He may have taken part in the 1475 festival of the Landshut Wedding of Jadwiga Jagiellon and George of Bavaria. from Jan Polack

    • In 1475 he organized the Landshut Wedding of his son George with the princess Hedwig Jagiellon, a daughter of King Casimir IV of Poland, one of the most splendid festivals of the Middle Age. from Louis IX, Duke of Bavaria

    • November 14 – The original Landshut Wedding takes place, between George, Duke of Bavaria, and Hedwig Jagiellon. from 1475

    • The wedding of Duke George with the Polish Princess Royal Jadwiga Jagiellon in 1475 was celebrated in Landshut with one of the most splendid festivals of the Middle Ages (called "Landshuter Hochzeit"). from Landshut

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      St. Martin's Church, Landshut The Church of St. Martin in Landshut is a medieval church in that German city. St. Martin's Church, along with…
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      The Church of St. Martin in Landshut is a medieval church in that German city. St. Martin's Church, along with Trausnitz Castle and the celebration of the Landshuter Hochzeit (wedding), are the most important landmarks and historical events of Landshut. This Brick Gothic church is the tallest church in Bavaria and the tallest brick building…

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      The Church of St. Martin in Landshut is a medieval church in that German city. St. Martin's Church, along with Trausnitz Castle and the celebration of the Landshuter Hochzeit (wedding), are the most important landmarks and historical events of Landshut. This Brick Gothic church is the tallest church in Bavaria and the tallest brick building and church, and 2nd tallest brick structure in the world (after Anaconda Smelter Stack), made without steel supports, with a height of 130.6 metres (428 ft).1

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    How Landshut Wedding
    Connects To St. Martin's Church, Landshut

    • St. Martin's Church, along with Trausnitz Castle and the celebration of the Landshuter Hochzeit (wedding), are the most important landmarks and historical events of Landshut. from St. Martin's Church, Landshut

    • The bridal pair were married in St. Martin's Church, and the service was officiated by Salzburg's Archbishop Bernhard von Rohr. from Landshut Wedding

    • Jadwiga traveled for two months to Landshut in Bavaria, where an elaborate marriage celebration, the Landshut Wedding (Landshuter Hochzeit 1475) took place in St. Martin's church (Landshut). from History of Kraków

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      George, Duke of Bavaria George of Bavaria referred to as the Rich (15 August 1455, Burghausen, Bavaria – 1 December 1503 Ingolstadt)…
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      George of Bavaria referred to as the Rich (15 August 1455, Burghausen, Bavaria – 1 December 1503 Ingolstadt), (German: Georg , Herzog von Bayern-Landshut) was the last Duke of Bavaria-Landshut. He was a son of Louis IX the Rich and Amalia of Saxony.

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    How Landshut Wedding
    Connects To George, Duke of Bavaria

    • His wedding with the princess Hedwig Jagiellon, a daughter of King Casimir IV of Poland, in 1475 was celebrated in the Landshut Wedding with one of the most splendid festivals of the Middle Age. from George, Duke of Bavaria

    • The festival is held in memory of the wedding between George of Bavaria, the son of the Bavarian duke, and Hedwig Jagiellon, daughter of King Casimir IV Jagiellon of Poland, in 1475. from Landshut Wedding

    • It commemorates the wedding between Hedwig, the Polish King's daughter, and George, the son of the Duke of Landshut. from Landshut Wedding

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    • In 14 November 1475 Hedwig married Duke George of Bavaria in Landshut, which started the tradition of the famous medieval pageant Landshut Wedding. from Hedwig Jagiellon, Duchess of Bavaria

    • He may have taken part in the 1475 festival of the Landshut Wedding of Jadwiga Jagiellon and George of Bavaria. from Jan Polack

    • November 14 – The original Landshut Wedding takes place, between George, Duke of Bavaria, and Hedwig Jagiellon. from 1475

    • The wedding of Duke George with the Polish Princess Royal Jadwiga Jagiellon in 1475 was celebrated in Landshut with one of the most splendid festivals of the Middle Ages (called "Landshuter Hochzeit"). from Landshut

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      Landshut Residence The Landshut Residence (German:Stadtresidenz Landshut) is a palace in Landshut, Lower Bavaria.
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      The Landshut Residence (German:Stadtresidenz Landshut) is a palace in Landshut, Lower Bavaria.

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    How Landshut Wedding
    Connects To Landshut Residence

    • Musicians and dancers of Landshut are invited to an atmospheric evening in the courtyard of the Residenz. from Landshut Wedding

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      Medieval pageant A medieval pageant is a form of procession traditionally associated with both secular and religious rituals, often…
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      A medieval pageant is a form of procession traditionally associated with both secular and religious rituals, often with a narrative structure. Pageantry was an important aspect of medieval European seasonal festivals, in particular around the celebration of Corpus Christi, which began after the thirteenth century. This festival reenacted the entire history of the world, in…

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      A medieval pageant is a form of procession traditionally associated with both secular and religious rituals, often with a narrative structure. Pageantry was an important aspect of medieval European seasonal festivals, in particular around the celebration of Corpus Christi, which began after the thirteenth century. This festival reenacted the entire history of the world, in processional performance, from Bible's Genesis to the Apocalypse, employing hundreds of performers and mobile scenic elements. Plays were performed on mobile stages, called waggons, that traveled through towns so plays could be watched consecutively. Each waggon was sponsored by a guild who wrote, designed, and acted in the plays.
      Other pageants in the Christian world have centered on Saints' festivals, Carnival (Mardi Gras), and Easter, while vernacular agrarian festivals have celebrated seasonal events such as the harvest, and the Summer and Winter solstices (Midsummer's Night).
      Drawing on this medieval tradition contemporary artists such as Bread and Puppet Theater, the Welfare State, In the Heart of the Beast Puppet and Mask Theatre, Spiral Q, and Superior Concept Monsters have used pageants as a potent community-based performance form.

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    How Landshut Wedding
    Connects To Medieval pageant

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      Growth of the Ottoman Empire The Growth of the Ottoman Empire (29 May 1453 – 11 November 1606) is the period followed after the Rise of the…
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      The Growth of the Ottoman Empire (29 May 1453 – 11 November 1606) is the period followed after the Rise of the Ottoman Empire in which the Ottoman state reached the Pax Ottomana. In this period, the Ottoman Empire expanded southwestwards into North Africa and battled with the re-emergent Persian Shi'ia Safavid Empire to the east. The growth period was followed by the Stagnation of the Ottoman Empire.

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    How Landshut Wedding
    Connects To Growth of the Ottoman Empire

    • The exact recordings can be explained from the historical context with the Fall of Constantinople in 1453 which led into to a longer period of growth of the Ottoman Empire. from Landshut Wedding

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      Landshut Landshut (Austro-Bavarian: Landshuad) is a city in Bavaria in the south-east of Germany, belonging to both Eastern…
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      Landshut (Austro-Bavarian: Landshuad) is a city in Bavaria in the south-east of Germany, belonging to both Eastern and Southern Bavaria. Situated on the banks of the River Isar, Landshut is the capital of Lower Bavaria, one of the seven administrative regions of the Free State of Bavaria. It is also the seat of the surrounding…

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      Landshut (Austro-Bavarian: Landshuad) is a city in Bavaria in the south-east of Germany, belonging to both Eastern and Southern Bavaria. Situated on the banks of the River Isar, Landshut is the capital of Lower Bavaria, one of the seven administrative regions of the Free State of Bavaria. It is also the seat of the surrounding district, and with a population of more than 60,000. Landshut is the largest city in Lower Bavaria, followed by Passau and Straubing, and Eastern Bavaria's second biggest city.
      Owing to its characteristic coat of arms, the city is also often called "Three Helmets City" (German: Dreihelmenstadt).
      Due to its proximity and easy access to Munich and the Franz Josef Strauss International Airport, situated halfway between Munich and Landshut on the banks of the Isar, the city has East Bavaria's lowest unemployment rate (ca. 4.2% in October 2006), lower than the Bavarian average of ca. 5.8%.

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    How Landshut Wedding
    Connects To Landshut

    • Landshut is also known for a festival celebrated every four years called the Landshuter Hochzeit, commemorating the 1475 marriage of George of Bavaria and Jadwiga Jagiellon. from Landshut

    • The wedding of Duke George with the Polish Princess Royal Jadwiga Jagiellon in 1475 was celebrated in Landshut with one of the most splendid festivals of the Middle Ages (called "Landshuter Hochzeit"). from Landshut

    • Countless visitors from all over the world have taken part, or have been spectators of the "Landshuter Hochzeit 1475", a pageant held in Landshut, Bavaria (Germany). from Landshut Wedding

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    • In 14 November 1475 Hedwig married Duke George of Bavaria in Landshut, which started the tradition of the famous medieval pageant Landshut Wedding. from Hedwig Jagiellon, Duchess of Bavaria

    • Jadwiga traveled for two months to Landshut in Bavaria, where an elaborate marriage celebration, the Landshut Wedding (Landshuter Hochzeit 1475) took place in St. Martin's church (Landshut). from History of Kraków

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      Casimir IV Jagiellon Casimir IV KG (Polish: Kazimierz IV Jagiellończyk [kaˈʑimi̯ɛʒ jaɡi̯ɛlˈlɔɲt͡ʃɨk] ( ); Lithuanian: Kazimieras IV…
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      Casimir IV KG (Polish: Kazimierz IV Jagiellończyk [kaˈʑimi̯ɛʒ jaɡi̯ɛlˈlɔɲt͡ʃɨk] ( ); Lithuanian: Kazimieras IV Jogailaitis; 30 November 1427 – 7 June 1492) of the House of Jagiellon was Grand Duke of Lithuania from 1440, and King of Poland from 1447, until his death. He was one of the most active Polish rulers, under whom…

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      Casimir IV KG (Polish: Kazimierz IV Jagiellończyk [kaˈʑimi̯ɛʒ jaɡi̯ɛlˈlɔɲt͡ʃɨk] ( ); Lithuanian: Kazimieras IV Jogailaitis; 30 November 1427 – 7 June 1492) of the House of Jagiellon was Grand Duke of Lithuania from 1440, and King of Poland from 1447, until his death. He was one of the most active Polish rulers, under whom Poland, by defeating the Teutonic Knights in the Thirteen Years' War recovered Pomerania, and the Jagiellonian dynasty became one of the leading royal houses in Europe. He was a strong opponent of aristocracy, and helped to strengthen the importance of Parliament and the Senat.
      Casimir was the second son of King Władysław II Jagiełło (Jogaila), and the younger brother of Władysław III of Varna.

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    How Landshut Wedding
    Connects To Casimir IV Jagiellon

    • Delegates had gone to Kraków to negotiate the marriage, and their "Landshut Wedding" took place in Bavaria with much pomp and celebration in 1475, starting a tradition which continues to this day. from Casimir IV Jagiellon

    • The festival is held in memory of the wedding between George of Bavaria, the son of the Bavarian duke, and Hedwig Jagiellon, daughter of King Casimir IV Jagiellon of Poland, in 1475. from Landshut Wedding

    • His wedding with the princess Hedwig Jagiellon, a daughter of King Casimir IV of Poland, in 1475 was celebrated in the Landshut Wedding with one of the most splendid festivals of the Middle Age. from George, Duke of Bavaria

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    • In 1475 he organized the Landshut Wedding of his son George with the princess Hedwig Jagiellon, a daughter of King Casimir IV of Poland, one of the most splendid festivals of the Middle Age. from Louis IX, Duke of Bavaria

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      Pierre de la Rue Pierre de la Rue (c. 1452 – 20 November 1518) was a Netherlandish composer and singer of the Renaissance. His name…
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      Pierre de la Rue (c. 1452 – 20 November 1518) was a Netherlandish composer and singer of the Renaissance. His name also appears as Piersson or variants of Pierchon and his toponymic, when present, as various forms of de Platea, de Robore, or de Vico. A member of the same generation as Josquin des…

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      Pierre de la Rue (c. 1452 – 20 November 1518) was a Netherlandish composer and singer of the Renaissance. His name also appears as Piersson or variants of Pierchon and his toponymic, when present, as various forms of de Platea, de Robore, or de Vico. A member of the same generation as Josquin des Prez, and a long associate of the Habsburg-Burgundian musical chapel, he ranks with Agricola, Brumel, Compère, Isaac, Obrecht, and Weerbeke as one of the most famous and influential composers in the Netherlands polyphonic style in the decades around 1500.

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    How Landshut Wedding
    Connects To Pierre de la Rue

    • It focuses on works of famous composers like Pierre de la Rue, Guillaume Dufay and Josquin des Prez, who was one of the most significant composers in the Middle Ages in Europe. from Landshut Wedding

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      Fire eating Fire eating is the act of putting a flaming object into the mouth and extinguishing it. A fire eater is most…
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      Fire eating is the act of putting a flaming object into the mouth and extinguishing it. A fire eater is most commonly an entertainer, often a street artist, part of a sideshow or a circus act. Fire eating torches are generally metal with wrapped kevlar wicks or cotton, secured with kevlar thread.

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    How Landshut Wedding
    Connects To Fire eating

    • They are in their quarters, in bars, or are entertained by games and shows by different artists like tumblers and fire-eaters. from Landshut Wedding

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      Guillaume Dufay Guillaume Dufay (French pronunciation: [dyfɛ]; also Du Fay, Du Fayt; August 5, c. 1397 – November 27, 1474) was a…
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      Guillaume Dufay (French pronunciation: [dyfɛ]; also Du Fay, Du Fayt; August 5, c. 1397 – November 27, 1474) was a Franco-Flemish composer of the early Renaissance. As the central figure in the Burgundian School, he was the most famous and influential composer in Europe in the mid-15th century.

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    How Landshut Wedding
    Connects To Guillaume Dufay

    • It focuses on works of famous composers like Pierre de la Rue, Guillaume Dufay and Josquin des Prez, who was one of the most significant composers in the Middle Ages in Europe. from Landshut Wedding

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      Living history Living history is an activity that incorporates historical tools, activities and dress into an interactive…
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      Living history is an activity that incorporates historical tools, activities and dress into an interactive presentation that seeks to give observers and participants a sense of stepping back in time. Although it does not necessarily seek to reenact a specific event in history, living history is similar to, and sometimes incorporates, historical reenactment. Living history…

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      Living history is an activity that incorporates historical tools, activities and dress into an interactive presentation that seeks to give observers and participants a sense of stepping back in time. Although it does not necessarily seek to reenact a specific event in history, living history is similar to, and sometimes incorporates, historical reenactment. Living history is an educational medium used by living history museums, historic sites, heritage interpreters, schools and historical reenactment groups to educate the public or their own members in particular areas of history, such as clothing styles, pastimes and handicrafts, or to simply convey a sense of the everyday life of a certain period in history.

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    How Landshut Wedding
    Connects To Living history

    • Along with the growing fascination for the Middle Ages in the late 20th century the Landshut Wedding has become a well-known mediaeval festival with great impact on the region’s economics as well as its cultural traditions and aspects of living history. from Landshut Wedding

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      Bride price Bride price, also known as bridewealth or bride token, is an amount of money or property or wealth paid by the…
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      Bride price, also known as bridewealth or bride token, is an amount of money or property or wealth paid by the groom or his family to the parents of a woman upon the marriage of their daughter to the groom. (Compare dowry, which is paid to the groom, or used by the bride to help…

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      Bride price, also known as bridewealth or bride token, is an amount of money or property or wealth paid by the groom or his family to the parents of a woman upon the marriage of their daughter to the groom. (Compare dowry, which is paid to the groom, or used by the bride to help establish the new household, and dower, which is property settled on the bride herself by the groom at the time of marriage.) The agreed bride price may or may not be intended to reflect the perceived value of the girl or young woman.
      The same culture may simultaneously practice both dowry and bride price. Many cultures practiced bride price prior to existing records.

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    How Landshut Wedding
    Connects To Bride price

    • The marriage of the Polish princess with George "the Rich" was very profitable for the Polish king - the 32,000 Guilder bride wealth he received is worth about 6.5 million Euro in modern currency. from Landshut Wedding

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      Guilder Guilder is the English translation of the Dutch and German gulden, originally shortened from Middle High German…
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      Guilder is the English translation of the Dutch and German gulden, originally shortened from Middle High German guldin pfenninc "gold penny". This was the term that became current in the southern and western parts of the Holy Roman Empire for the Fiorino d'oro (introduced 1252). Hence, the name has often been interchangeable with florin (currency sign ƒ. or ƒl.).

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    How Landshut Wedding
    Connects To Guilder

    • The marriage of the Polish princess with George "the Rich" was very profitable for the Polish king - the 32,000 Guilder bride wealth he received is worth about 6.5 million Euro in modern currency. from Landshut Wedding

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      Josquin des Prez Josquin des Prez (or Josquin Lebloitte dit Desprez; French: [ʒɔskɛ̃ depʁe]; c. 1450/1455 – 27 August 1521), often…
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      Josquin des Prez (or Josquin Lebloitte dit Desprez; French: [ʒɔskɛ̃ depʁe]; c. 1450/1455 – 27 August 1521), often referred to simply as Josquin, was a Netherlandish composer of the Renaissance. He is also known as Josquin Desprez and Latinized as Josquinus Pratensis, alternatively Jodocus Pratensis. He himself spelled his name "Josquin des Prez" in an…

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      Josquin des Prez (or Josquin Lebloitte dit Desprez; French: [ʒɔskɛ̃ depʁe]; c. 1450/1455 – 27 August 1521), often referred to simply as Josquin, was a Netherlandish composer of the Renaissance. He is also known as Josquin Desprez and Latinized as Josquinus Pratensis, alternatively Jodocus Pratensis. He himself spelled his name "Josquin des Prez" in an acrostic in his motet Illibata Dei virgo nutrix. He was the most famous European composer between Guillaume Dufay and Palestrina, and is usually considered to be the central figure of the Franco-Flemish School. Josquin is widely considered by music scholars to be the first master of the high Renaissance style of polyphonic vocal music that was emerging during his lifetime.
      During the 16th century, Josquin gradually acquired the reputation as the greatest composer of the age, his mastery of technique and expression universally imitated and admired. Writers as diverse as Baldassare Castiglione and Martin Luther wrote about his reputation and fame; theorists such as Heinrich Glarean and Gioseffo Zarlino held his style as that best representing perfection. He was so admired that many anonymous compositions were attributed to him by copyists, probably to increase their sales. More than 370 works are attributed to him; it was only after the advent of modern analytical scholarship that some of these mistaken attributions have been challenged, on the basis of stylistic features and manuscript evidence. Yet in spite of Josquin's colossal reputation, which endured until the beginning of the Baroque era and was revived in the 20th century, his biography is shadowy, and next to nothing is known about his personality. The only surviving work which may be in his own hand is a graffito on the wall of the Sistine Chapel, and only one contemporary mention of his character is known, in a letter to Duke Ercole I of Ferrara. The lives of dozens of minor composers of the Renaissance are better documented than the life of Josquin.
      Josquin wrote both sacred and secular music, and in all of the significant vocal forms of the age, including masses, motets, chansons and frottole. During the 16th century, he was praised for both his supreme melodic gift and his use of ingenious technical devices. In modern times, scholars have attempted to ascertain the basic details of his biography, and have tried to define the key characteristics of his style to correct misattributions, a task that has proved difficult, as Josquin liked to solve compositional problems in different ways in successive compositions—sometimes he wrote in an austere style devoid of ornamentation, and at other times he wrote music requiring considerable virtuosity. Heinrich Glarean wrote in 1547 that Josquin was not only a "magnificent virtuoso" (the Latin can be translated also as "show-off") but capable of being a "mocker", using satire effectively. While the focus of scholarship in recent years has been to remove music from the "Josquin canon" (including some of his most famous pieces) and to reattribute it to his contemporaries, the remaining music represents some of the most famous and enduring of the Renaissance.

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    How Landshut Wedding
    Connects To Josquin des Prez

    • It focuses on works of famous composers like Pierre de la Rue, Guillaume Dufay and Josquin des Prez, who was one of the most significant composers in the Middle Ages in Europe. from Landshut Wedding

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      German Reich Deutsches Reich (German: [ˈdɔʏtʃəs ˈʀaɪç]) was the official name for the German nation state from 1871 to 1943 in…
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      Deutsches Reich (German: [ˈdɔʏtʃəs ˈʀaɪç]) was the official name for the German nation state from 1871 to 1943 in the German language. It translates literally in English to "German Empire" and appropriately "German Realm". From 1943 to 1945 the official name of the Reich was Großdeutsches Reich ("Greater German Reich").…

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      Deutsches Reich (German: [ˈdɔʏtʃəs ˈʀaɪç]) was the official name for the German nation state from 1871 to 1943 in the German language. It translates literally in English to "German Empire" and appropriately "German Realm". From 1943 to 1945 the official name of the Reich was Großdeutsches Reich ("Greater German Reich").
      To refer to the entire period, the partially translated "German Reich" /ˈdʒɜrmən ˈraɪk/, which has no monarchical connotations, is often used, with "German Realm" being a more appropriate direct translation of the official title. Informally, this nation was also simply known as Germany.

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    How Landshut Wedding
    Connects To German Reich

    • The original motivation for the festival dates back to the foundation of the German Reich in 1871 which furthered German national pride. from Landshut Wedding

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      Archbishopric of Salzburg The Archbishopric of Salzburg was a Prince-Bishopric and state of the Holy Roman Empire for many centuries. The…
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      The Archbishopric of Salzburg was a Prince-Bishopric and state of the Holy Roman Empire for many centuries. The diocese arose from St Peter's Abbey, founded in the German stem duchy of Bavaria about 696 by Saint Rupert at the former Roman city of Iuvavum (Salzburg).…

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      The Archbishopric of Salzburg was a Prince-Bishopric and state of the Holy Roman Empire for many centuries. The diocese arose from St Peter's Abbey, founded in the German stem duchy of Bavaria about 696 by Saint Rupert at the former Roman city of Iuvavum (Salzburg).
      In the 13th century it reached Imperial immediacy and independency from Bavaria, and remained an ecclesiastical state until its secularisation to the short-lived Electorate of Salzburg in 1803. The Prince-Archbishops had never obtained electoral dignity; actually of the five Prince-archbishoprics of the Holy Roman Empire—with Mainz, Trier and Cologne—Magdeburg and Salzburg got nothing from the Golden Bull of 1356. The last Prince-Archbishop exercising secular authority was Count Hieronymus von Colloredo, an early patron of Salzburg native Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

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    How Landshut Wedding
    Connects To Archbishopric of Salzburg

    • The bridal pair were married in St. Martin's Church, and the service was officiated by Salzburg's Archbishop Bernhard von Rohr. from Landshut Wedding

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      Jousting Jousting is a martial game or hastilude between two horsemen and using lances, often as part of a tournament. The…
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      Jousting is a martial game or hastilude between two horsemen and using lances, often as part of a tournament. The primary aim is to strike the opponent with the lance while riding towards him at high speed, if possible breaking the lance on the opponent's shield or armour, or unhorsing him.…

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      Jousting is a martial game or hastilude between two horsemen and using lances, often as part of a tournament. The primary aim is to strike the opponent with the lance while riding towards him at high speed, if possible breaking the lance on the opponent's shield or armour, or unhorsing him.
      Jousting emerged in the High Middle Ages based on the military use of the lance by heavy cavalry. It transformed into a specialised sport during the Late Middle Ages, and remained popular with the nobility both in England and Germany throughout the whole of the 16th century (while in France, it was discontinued after the death of king Henry II in an accident in 1559). In England, jousting was the highlight of the Accession Day tilts of Elizabeth I and James I, and also was part of the festivities at the marriage of Charles I.
      Jousting was discontinued in favour of other equestrian sports in the 17th century, although non-contact forms of "equestrian skill-at-arms" disciplines survived. There has been a limited revival of theatrical jousting re-enactment since the 1970s.
      The joust became an iconic characteristic of the knight in Romantic medievalism and hence in the depiction of the Middle Ages in popular culture. Jousting matches were notably depicted in Ivanhoe (1820).
      The term joust is derived from Old French joster, ultimately from a Late Latin iuxtare "to approach, to meet". The word was loaned into Middle English around 1300, when jousting was a very popular sport among the Anglo-Norman knighthood. The synonym tilt dates ca. 1510.

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    How Landshut Wedding
    Connects To Jousting

    • The original medieval wedding is re-enacted every four years, and everyone gets carried away with medieval jousting, pageantry, feasting and wedding processions for a short period in the summer. from Landshut Wedding

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      Acrobatics Acrobatics (from Greek ἀκροβατέω - akrobateō, "walk on tiptoe, strut") is the performance of extraordinary feats of…
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      Acrobatics (from Greek ἀκροβατέω - akrobateō, "walk on tiptoe, strut") is the performance of extraordinary feats of balance, agility, and motor coordination. It can be found in many of the performing arts as well as in many sports (sporting) events, and martial arts. Acrobatics is most often associated with activities that make extensive use of…

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      Acrobatics (from Greek ἀκροβατέω - akrobateō, "walk on tiptoe, strut") is the performance of extraordinary feats of balance, agility, and motor coordination. It can be found in many of the performing arts as well as in many sports (sporting) events, and martial arts. Acrobatics is most often associated with activities that make extensive use of gymnastic elements, such as acro dance, circus, and gymnastics, but many other athletic activities — such as ballet and diving — may also employ acrobatics. Although acrobatics is most commonly associated with human body performance, it may also apply to other types of performance, such as aerobatics.

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    How Landshut Wedding
    Connects To Acrobatics

    • They are in their quarters, in bars, or are entertained by games and shows by different artists like tumblers and fire-eaters. from Landshut Wedding

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      Fall of Constantinople The Fall of Constantinople (Greek: Άλωση της Κωνσταντινούπολης, Alōsē tēs Kōnstantinoupolēs; Turkish: İstanbul'un…
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      The Fall of Constantinople (Greek: Άλωση της Κωνσταντινούπολης, Alōsē tēs Kōnstantinoupolēs; Turkish: İstanbul'un Fethi Conquest of Istanbul) was the capture of the capital of the Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empire by an invading army of the Ottoman Empire on Tuesday, 29 May 1453. The Ottomans were commanded by 21-year-old Ottoman Sultan Mehmed II, who defeated an…

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      The Fall of Constantinople (Greek: Άλωση της Κωνσταντινούπολης, Alōsē tēs Kōnstantinoupolēs; Turkish: İstanbul'un Fethi Conquest of Istanbul) was the capture of the capital of the Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empire by an invading army of the Ottoman Empire on Tuesday, 29 May 1453. The Ottomans were commanded by 21-year-old Ottoman Sultan Mehmed II, who defeated an army commanded by Byzantine Emperor Constantine XI Palaiologos. The conquest of Constantinople followed a seven-week siege that had begun on Friday, 6 April 1453.
      The capture of Constantinople (and two other Byzantine splinter territories soon thereafter) marked the end of the Roman Empire, an imperial state which had lasted for nearly 1,500 years. The Ottoman conquest of Constantinople also dealt a massive blow to Christendom, as the Ottoman armies thereafter were free to advance into Europe without an adversary to their rear. After the conquest, Sultan Mehmed transferred the capital of the Ottoman Empire from Adrianople to Constantinople. Several Greek and non-Greek intellectuals fled the city before and after the siege, with the majority of them migrating particularly to Italy, which helped fuel the Renaissance.
      The conquest of the city of Constantinople and the end of the Byzantine Empire was a key event in the Late Middle Ages which also marks, for some historians, the end of the Middle Ages.

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    How Landshut Wedding
    Connects To Fall of Constantinople

    • The exact recordings can be explained from the historical context with the Fall of Constantinople in 1453 which led into to a longer period of growth of the Ottoman Empire. from Landshut Wedding

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      Late Middle Ages The Late Middle Ages (or Late Mediaeval Period) was the period of European history generally comprising the 14th…
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      The Late Middle Ages (or Late Mediaeval Period) was the period of European history generally comprising the 14th and 15th centuries (c. 1301–1500). The Late Middle Ages followed the High Middle Ages and preceded the onset of the early modern era (and, in much of Europe, the Renaissance).…

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      The Late Middle Ages (or Late Mediaeval Period) was the period of European history generally comprising the 14th and 15th centuries (c. 1301–1500). The Late Middle Ages followed the High Middle Ages and preceded the onset of the early modern era (and, in much of Europe, the Renaissance).
      Around 1300, centuries of prosperity and growth in Europe came to a halt. A series of famines and plagues, such as the Great Famine of 1315–1317 and the Black Death, reduced the population to around half of what it was before the calamities. Along with depopulation came social unrest and endemic warfare. France and England experienced serious peasant uprisings: the Jacquerie, the Peasants' Revolt, as well as over a century of intermittent conflict in the Hundred Years' War. To add to the many problems of the period, the unity of the Catholic Church was shattered by the Western Schism. Collectively these events are sometimes called the Crisis of the Late Middle Ages.
      Despite these crises, the 14th century was also a time of great progress within the arts and sciences. Following a renewed interest in ancient Greek and Roman texts that took root in the High Middle Ages, the Italian Renaissance began. The absorption of Latin texts had started before the Renaissance of the 12th century through contact with Arabs during the Crusades, but the availability of important Greek texts accelerated with the capture of Constantinople by the Ottoman Turks, when many Byzantine scholars had to seek refuge in the West, particularly Italy.
      Combined with this influx of classical ideas was the invention of printing which facilitated dissemination of the printed word and democratized learning. These two things would later lead to the Protestant Reformation. Toward the end of the period, an era of discovery began (Age of Discovery). The growth of the Ottoman Empire, culminating in the Fall of Constantinople in 1453, eroded the last remnants of the Byzantine Empire and cut off trading possibilities with the east. Europeans were forced to discover new trading routes, as was the case with Columbus’s travel to the Americas in 1492, and Vasco da Gama’s circumnavigation of India and Africa in 1498. Their discoveries strengthened the economy and power of European nations.
      The changes brought about by these developments have caused many scholars to see it as leading to the end of the Middle Ages, and the beginning of modern history and early modern Europe. However, the division will always be a somewhat artificial one for scholars, since ancient learning was never entirely absent from European society. As such there was developmental continuity between the ancient age (via classical antiquity) and the modern age. Some historians, particularly in Italy, prefer not to speak of late Middle Ages at all, but rather see the high period of the Middle Ages transitioning to the Renaissance and the modern era.

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    How Landshut Wedding
    Connects To Late Middle Ages

    • More than 2,000 participants in medieval costumes bring the festival to life to recreate the Late Middle Ages. from Landshut Wedding

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      Bavaria The Free State of Bavaria (German: Freistaat Bayern, pronounced [ˈfʁaɪʃtaːt ˈbaɪ.ɐn] ( ), Alemannic German…
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      The Free State of Bavaria (German: Freistaat Bayern, pronounced [ˈfʁaɪʃtaːt ˈbaɪ.ɐn] ( ), Alemannic German: Freistaat Bayre, Austro-Bavarian: Freistood Boajan/Baijaan, Main-Franconian: Freischdood Bayan) is a state of Germany, located in the southeast. With an area of 70,548 square kilometres (27,200 sq mi), it is the largest state by area, forming almost 20 percent of…

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      The Free State of Bavaria (German: Freistaat Bayern, pronounced [ˈfʁaɪʃtaːt ˈbaɪ.ɐn] ( ), Alemannic German: Freistaat Bayre, Austro-Bavarian: Freistood Boajan/Baijaan, Main-Franconian: Freischdood Bayan) is a state of Germany, located in the southeast. With an area of 70,548 square kilometres (27,200 sq mi), it is the largest state by area, forming almost 20 percent of the total land area of Germany. Bavaria is Germany's second most populous state (after North Rhine-Westphalia), with 12.5 million inhabitants. Bavaria's capital and largest city is Munich, the third largest city in Germany.
      The History of Bavaria stretches from its earliest settlement and its formation as a stem duchy in the 6th century through its inclusion in the Holy Roman Empires to its status as an independent kingdom and finally as a large Bundesland (state) of the modern, re-united Federal Republic of Germany.
      The earliest proof for the existence of Bavaria having been established as a stem duchy dates back to the year 555. In the 17th century, the Duke of Bavaria became a Prince-elector of the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation. The Kingdom of Bavaria existed from 1806 to 1918, and Bavaria has since been a free state (republic). In the past Germany’s Bundesverfassungsgericht (“Federal Constitutional Court”) issued several decisions stating that the Deutsches Reich (“German Empire”) never ceased to exist despite the Nazi era’s overgrowing of existing structures of statehood by “creations” of its own (say Gaue or various party organizations), the Allied Forces’s occupation following Nazi-Germany’s military breakdown and the foundation of both the FRG (the Reich’s self-proclaimed assignee) and the GDR. In 1946 the Free State of Bavaria re-founded and re-organised itself on new, democratic foundations. This measure of continuity makes Bavaria the oldest, uninterrupted existing political structure (state) in Europe.
      Modern Bavaria also includes parts of the historical regions of Franconia, Upper Palatinate and Swabia.

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    How Landshut Wedding
    Connects To Bavaria

    • Countless visitors from all over the world have taken part, or have been spectators of the "Landshuter Hochzeit 1475", a pageant held in Landshut, Bavaria (Germany). from Landshut Wedding

    • Delegates had gone to Kraków to negotiate the marriage, and their "Landshut Wedding" took place in Bavaria with much pomp and celebration in 1475, starting a tradition which continues to this day. from Casimir IV Jagiellon

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      Black Death The Black Death was one of the most devastating pandemics in human history, resulting in the deaths of an estimated…
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      The Black Death was one of the most devastating pandemics in human history, resulting in the deaths of an estimated 75 to 200 million people and peaking in Europe in the years 1346–53. Although there were several competing theories as to the etiology of the Black Death, analysis of DNA from victims in northern and…

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      The Black Death was one of the most devastating pandemics in human history, resulting in the deaths of an estimated 75 to 200 million people and peaking in Europe in the years 1346–53. Although there were several competing theories as to the etiology of the Black Death, analysis of DNA from victims in northern and southern Europe published in 2010 and 2011 indicates that the pathogen responsible was the Yersinia pestis bacterium, probably causing several forms of plague.
      The Black Death is thought to have originated in the arid plains of central Asia, where it then travelled along the Silk Road, reaching the Crimea by 1343. From there, it was most likely carried by Oriental rat fleas living on the black rats that were regular passengers on merchant ships. Spreading throughout the Mediterranean and Europe, the Black Death is estimated to have killed 30–60% of Europe's total population. All in all, the plague reduced the world population from an estimated 450 million down to 350–375 million in the 14th century.
      The aftermath of the plague created a series of religious, social, and economic upheavals, which had profound effects on the course of European history. It took 150 years for Europe's population to recover. The plague recurred occasionally in Europe until the 19th century.

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    How Landshut Wedding
    Connects To Black Death

    • Death and plague were the constant companions on the march from Poland to Germany. from Landshut Wedding

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      Kraków Kraków (Polish pronunciation: [ˈkrakuf] ( )) also Cracow, or Krakow (US English /ˈkrækaʊ/, British English…
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      Kraków (Polish pronunciation: [ˈkrakuf] ( )) also Cracow, or Krakow (US English /ˈkrækaʊ/, British English /ˈkrækɒv/) is the second largest and one of the oldest cities in Poland. Situated on the Vistula River (Polish: Wisła) in the Lesser Poland region, the city dates back to the 7th century. Kraków has traditionally been one of…

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      Kraków (Polish pronunciation: [ˈkrakuf] ( )) also Cracow, or Krakow (US English /ˈkrækaʊ/, British English /ˈkrækɒv/) is the second largest and one of the oldest cities in Poland. Situated on the Vistula River (Polish: Wisła) in the Lesser Poland region, the city dates back to the 7th century. Kraków has traditionally been one of the leading centres of Polish academic, cultural, and artistic life and is one of Poland's most important economic hubs. It was the capital of Poland from 1038 to 1569; the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth from 1569 to 1596; Free City of Kraków from 1815 to 1846; the Grand Duchy of Cracow from 1846 to 1918; and Kraków Voivodeship from the 14th century to 1999. It is now the capital of the Lesser Poland Voivodeship.
      The city has grown from a Stone Age settlement to Poland's second most important city. It began as a hamlet on Wawel Hill and was already being reported as a busy trading centre of Slavonic Europe in 965. With the establishment of new universities and cultural venues at the emergence of the Second Polish Republic in 1918 and throughout the 20th century, Kraków reaffirmed its role as a major national academic and artistic centre. The city has a population of approximately 760,000 whereas about 8 million people live within a 100 kilometres (62 miles) radius of its main square.
      After the invasion of Poland at the start of World War II, Kraków became the capital of Germany's General Government. Poles and Jews were classified as subhumans by the occupiers and were targeted for eventual extermination. The Jewish population of the city was moved into a walled zone known as the Kraków Ghetto, from which they were sent to German extermination camps such as the nearby Auschwitz and the concentration camps like Płaszów.
      In 1978, Karol Wojtyła, archbishop of Kraków, was elevated to the papacy as Pope John Paul II – the first Slavic pope ever, and the first non-Italian pope in 455 years. Also that year, UNESCO approved the first ever sites for its new World Heritage List, including the entire Old Town in inscribing Cracow's Historic Centre. Kraków is classified as a global city by GaWC, with the ranking of High sufficiency. Cited as one of Europe's most beautiful cities, its extensive cultural heritage across the epochs of Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque architecture includes the Wawel Cathedral and the Royal Castle on the banks of the Vistula river, the St. Mary's Basilica and the largest medieval market square in Europe, the Rynek Główny. Kraków is home to Jagiellonian University, one of the oldest universities in the world and traditionally Poland's most reputable institution of higher learning.
      In 2000, Kraków was named European Capital of Culture. The city will also host the next World Youth Day in 2016.

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    How Landshut Wedding
    Connects To Kraków

    • The wedding was negotiated in 1474 in Kraków through legations. from Landshut Wedding

    • Delegates had gone to Kraków to negotiate the marriage, and their "Landshut Wedding" took place in Bavaria with much pomp and celebration in 1475, starting a tradition which continues to this day. from Casimir IV Jagiellon

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      Ottoman Empire The Ottoman Empire (/ˈɒtəmən/; Ottoman Turkish: دَوْلَتِ عَلِيّهٔ عُثمَانِیّه, Devlet-i Aliyye-i Osmâniyye, Modern…
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      The Ottoman Empire (/ˈɒtəmən/; Ottoman Turkish: دَوْلَتِ عَلِيّهٔ عُثمَانِیّه, Devlet-i Aliyye-i Osmâniyye, Modern Turkish: Osmanlı İmparatorluğu), also historically referred to as the Turkish Empire or Turkey, was an empire founded by Oghuz Turks under Osman Bey in northwestern Anatolia in 1299. With the conquest of Constantinople by Mehmed II in 1453, the Ottoman state was transformed into an empire.…

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      The Ottoman Empire (/ˈɒtəmən/; Ottoman Turkish: دَوْلَتِ عَلِيّهٔ عُثمَانِیّه, Devlet-i Aliyye-i Osmâniyye, Modern Turkish: Osmanlı İmparatorluğu), also historically referred to as the Turkish Empire or Turkey, was an empire founded by Oghuz Turks under Osman Bey in northwestern Anatolia in 1299. With the conquest of Constantinople by Mehmed II in 1453, the Ottoman state was transformed into an empire.
      During the 16th and 17th centuries, in particular at the height of its power under the reign of Suleiman the Magnificent, the Ottoman Empire was one of the most powerful states in the world, a multinational, multilingual empire controlling much of Southeast Europe, Western Asia, the Caucasus, North Africa, and the Horn of Africa. At the beginning of the 17th century the empire contained 32 provinces and numerous vassal states. Some of these were later absorbed into the empire, while others were granted various types of autonomy during the course of centuries.
      With Constantinople as its capital and control of vast lands around the Mediterranean basin, the Ottoman Empire was at the centre of interactions between the Eastern and Western worlds for over six centuries. The empire was dissolved in the aftermath of World War I, leading to the emergence of the new state of Turkey in the Ottoman Anatolian heartland, as well as the creation of modern Balkan and Middle Eastern states.

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    How Landshut Wedding
    Connects To Ottoman Empire

    • The marriage was important because it was seen as a strong alliance against the Ottoman Turks. from Landshut Wedding

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      Germany Germany (/ˈdʒɜrməni/; German: Deutschland), officially the Federal Republic of Germany (German: Bundesrepublik…
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      Germany (/ˈdʒɜrməni/; German: Deutschland), officially the Federal Republic of Germany (German: Bundesrepublik Deutschland, pronounced [ˈbʊndəsʁepuˌbliːk ˈdɔʏtʃlant] ( )), is a federal parliamentary republic in western-central Europe consisting of 16 constituent states, which retain limited sovereignty. Its capital city and largest city is Berlin. Germany covers an area of 357,021 square kilometres (137,847 sq mi)…

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      Germany (/ˈdʒɜrməni/; German: Deutschland), officially the Federal Republic of Germany (German: Bundesrepublik Deutschland, pronounced [ˈbʊndəsʁepuˌbliːk ˈdɔʏtʃlant] ( )), is a federal parliamentary republic in western-central Europe consisting of 16 constituent states, which retain limited sovereignty. Its capital city and largest city is Berlin. Germany covers an area of 357,021 square kilometres (137,847 sq mi) and has a largely temperate seasonal climate. With 80.6 million inhabitants, it is the most populous member state in the European Union. Germany is a major economic and political power of the European continent and a historic leader in many cultural, theoretical and technical fields.
      Various Germanic tribes have occupied what is now northern Germany and southern Scandinavia since classical antiquity. A region named Germania was documented by the Romans before AD 100. During the Migration Period that coincided with the decline of the Roman Empire, the Germanic tribes expanded southward and established kingdoms throughout much of Europe. Beginning in the 10th century, German territories formed a central part of the Holy Roman Empire. During the 16th century, northern German regions became the centre of the Protestant Reformation. Occupied during the Napoleonic Wars, the rise of Pan-Germanism inside the German Confederation resulted in the unification of most of the German states in 1871 into the German Empire, which was dominated by Prussia.
      After the German Revolution of 1918–1919 and the subsequent military surrender in World War I, the Empire was replaced by the parliamentary Weimar Republic in 1918 and lost some of its territory in the Treaty of Versailles. Despite its lead in many scientific and cultural fields at this time, Germany experienced significant economic and political instability which intensified during the Great Depression. The establishment of the Third Reich or Nazi Regime in 1933 eventually led to World War II and the Holocaust. After 1945, Germany was divided by Allied occupation, and evolved into two states, East Germany and West Germany. In 1990, the country was reunified.
      Germany has the world's fourth-largest economy by nominal GDP and the fifth-largest by purchasing power parity. As a global leader in several industrial and technological sectors, it is both the world's third-largest exporter and third-largest importer of goods. It is a developed country with a very high standard of living, featuring comprehensive social security that includes the world's oldest universal health care system. Known for its rich cultural and political history, Germany has been the home of many influential philosophers, artists, musicians, scientists, and inventors. Germany was a founding member of the European Community in 1957, which became the EU in 1993. It is part of the Schengen Area, and has been a member of the eurozone since 1999. Germany is a great power, and a member of the United Nations, NATO, the G8, the G20, the OECD and the Council of Europe.

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    How Landshut Wedding
    Connects To Germany

    • Countless visitors from all over the world have taken part, or have been spectators of the "Landshuter Hochzeit 1475", a pageant held in Landshut, Bavaria (Germany). from Landshut Wedding

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