Show Less

Pre-Cana is a course or consultation couples must undergo before they can be married in a Catholic church. The name is derived from John 2:1–12, the wedding feast at Cana in Galilee, where Jesus performed the miracle of turning water into wine.

Show More

Approaches to Pre-Cana vary among Catholic dioceses and parishes. Often six month sessions are led by a priest or deacon with support from a married Catholic couple.
Online programs have emerged as an alternative to gathered events as parishes and dioceses cope with fewer resources, geographically expanding congregations and deployed military couples.
The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops considers the following topics as "must have conversations" before couples marry:
Other topics that may be covered by Pre-Cana…

…include:

    1. 1
      John 2 John 2 is the second chapter of the Gospel of John in the New Testament of the Christian Bible. It contains the…
    1. 1

      John 2 is the second chapter of the Gospel of John in the New Testament of the Christian Bible. It contains the famous stories of the miracle of Jesus turning water into wine and Jesus expelling the money changers from the Temple.

      SHOW LESS

    How Pre-Cana
    Connects To John 2

    • The name is derived from John 2:1–12, the wedding feast at Cana in Galilee, where Jesus performed the miracle of turning water into wine. from Pre-Cana

    1. 2
      Marriage (Catholic Church) Marriage in the Catholic Church, also called matrimony, is the "covenant by which a man and a woman establish…
    1. 2

      Marriage in the Catholic Church, also called matrimony, is the "covenant by which a man and a woman establish between themselves a partnership of the whole of life and which is ordered by its nature to the good of the spouses and the procreation and education of offspring", and which "has been raised by Christ…

      SHOW MORE

      Marriage in the Catholic Church, also called matrimony, is the "covenant by which a man and a woman establish between themselves a partnership of the whole of life and which is ordered by its nature to the good of the spouses and the procreation and education of offspring", and which "has been raised by Christ the Lord to the dignity of a sacrament between the baptised." Catholic matrimonial law, based on Roman law regarding its focus on marriage as a free mutual agreement or contract, became the basis for the marriage law of all European countries, at least up to the Reformation.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Pre-Cana
    Connects To Marriage (Catholic Church)

    1. 3
      Cana In the Christian New Testament, the Gospel of John refers a number of times to a town called Cana of Galilee.
    1. 3

      In the Christian New Testament, the Gospel of John refers a number of times to a town called Cana of Galilee.

      SHOW LESS

    How Pre-Cana
    Connects To Cana

    • The name is derived from John 2:1–12, the wedding feast at Cana in Galilee, where Jesus performed the miracle of turning water into wine. from Pre-Cana

    1. 4
      Miracles of Jesus The miracles of Jesus are the supernatural deeds attributed to Jesus in Christian and Islamic texts. According to…
    1. 4

      The miracles of Jesus are the supernatural deeds attributed to Jesus in Christian and Islamic texts. According to the Gospel of John, only some of these were recorded. The majority of those described are exorcisms, as well as faith healing, resurrection of the dead and control over nature.…

      SHOW MORE

      The miracles of Jesus are the supernatural deeds attributed to Jesus in Christian and Islamic texts. According to the Gospel of John, only some of these were recorded. The majority of those described are exorcisms, as well as faith healing, resurrection of the dead and control over nature.
      In the Synoptic Gospels (Mark, Matthew, and Luke), Jesus refuses to give a miraculous sign to prove his authority. In the Gospel of John, Jesus is said to have performed seven miraculous signs that characterize his ministry, from changing water into wine at the start of his ministry to raising Lazarus from the dead at the end.
      To many Christians and Muslims, the miracles are actual historical events. Certain Christian scholars present arguments for the historicity of miracles. Other religious believers, including liberal Christians, consider these stories to be figurative. Modern scholars, working from an Enlightenment viewpoint, tend to be skeptical about miracles.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Pre-Cana
    Connects To Miracles of Jesus

    • The name is derived from John 2:1–12, the wedding feast at Cana in Galilee, where Jesus performed the miracle of turning water into wine. from Pre-Cana

    1. 5
      Galilee Galilee (Hebrew: הגליל‎, translit. HaGalil; Arabic: الجليل‎, translit. al-Jalīl) is a region in northern Israel…
    1. 5

      Galilee (Hebrew: הגליל‎, translit. HaGalil; Arabic: الجليل‎, translit. al-Jalīl) is a region in northern Israel which overlaps with much of the administrative Northern District and Haifa District of the country. Traditionally divided into Upper Galilee (Hebrew: גליל עליון‎ Galil Elyon), Lower Galilee (Hebrew: גליל תחתון‎ Galil Tahton), and Western Galilee (Hebrew: גליל מערבי‎ Galil Ma'aravi),…

      SHOW MORE

      Galilee (Hebrew: הגליל‎, translit. HaGalil; Arabic: الجليل‎, translit. al-Jalīl) is a region in northern Israel which overlaps with much of the administrative Northern District and Haifa District of the country. Traditionally divided into Upper Galilee (Hebrew: גליל עליון‎ Galil Elyon), Lower Galilee (Hebrew: גליל תחתון‎ Galil Tahton), and Western Galilee (Hebrew: גליל מערבי‎ Galil Ma'aravi), extending from Dan to the north, at the base of Mount Hermon, along Mount Lebanon to the ridges of Mount Carmel and Mount Gilboa north of Jenin and Tulkarm to the south, and from the Jordan Rift Valley to the east across the plains of the Jezreel Valley and Acre to the shores of the Mediterranean Sea and the coastal plain in the west.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Pre-Cana
    Connects To Galilee

    • The name is derived from John 2:1–12, the wedding feast at Cana in Galilee, where Jesus performed the miracle of turning water into wine. from Pre-Cana

    1. 6
      Diocese A diocese, from the Greek term διοίκησις, meaning "administration", is the district under the supervision of a…
    1. 6

      A diocese, from the Greek term διοίκησις, meaning "administration", is the district under the supervision of a bishop. It is also known as a bishopric. A diocese is divided into parishes (in the Church of England into benefices and parishes). This structure of church governance is known as episcopal polity.…

      SHOW MORE

      A diocese, from the Greek term διοίκησις, meaning "administration", is the district under the supervision of a bishop. It is also known as a bishopric. A diocese is divided into parishes (in the Church of England into benefices and parishes). This structure of church governance is known as episcopal polity.
      The word diocesan means relating or pertaining to a diocese. It can also be used as a noun meaning the bishop who has the principal supervision of a diocese.
      In the Latter Day Saint movement the term "bishopric" is used not of the ward or congregation of which a bishop has charge but instead of the bishop himself together with his two counsellors. On this see Bishop (Latter Day Saints).
      An archdiocese (or archiepiscopal see or archbishopric) is more significant than a diocese. An archdiocese is presided over by an archbishop whose see may have or have had importance due to size or historical significance. The archbishop may have metropolitan authority over any other suffragan bishops and their dioceses within his ecclesiastical province.
      Bishops (Greek: επίσκοπος, transliterated epískopos, which literally means overseers) claim apostolic succession; a direct historical lineage dating back to the original Twelve Apostles. A diocese also may be referred to as a bishopric or episcopal see, though strictly the term episcopal see refers to the domain of ecclesiastical authority officially held by the bishop, and the term bishopric to the post of being bishop.
      Especially in the Middle Ages, some bishops (e.g. prince-bishops) held political as well as religious authority within their dioceses, which in practice were thus also independent or semi-independent states.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Pre-Cana
    Connects To Diocese

    • Online programs have emerged as an alternative to gathered events as parishes and dioceses cope with fewer resources, geographically expanding congregations and deployed military couples. from Pre-Cana

    • Approaches to Pre-Cana vary among Catholic dioceses and parishes. from Pre-Cana

    1. 7
      Wine Wine is an alcoholic beverage made from fermented grapes or other fruits. The natural chemical balance of grapes…
    1. 7

      Wine is an alcoholic beverage made from fermented grapes or other fruits. The natural chemical balance of grapes lets them ferment without the addition of sugars, acids, enzymes, water, or other nutrients. Yeast consumes the sugars in the grapes and converts them into alcohol and carbon dioxide. Different varieties of grapes and strains of yeasts…

      SHOW MORE

      Wine is an alcoholic beverage made from fermented grapes or other fruits. The natural chemical balance of grapes lets them ferment without the addition of sugars, acids, enzymes, water, or other nutrients. Yeast consumes the sugars in the grapes and converts them into alcohol and carbon dioxide. Different varieties of grapes and strains of yeasts produce different styles of wine. The well-known variations result from the very complex interactions between the biochemical development of the fruit, reactions involved in fermentation, terroir and subsequent appellation, along with human intervention in the overall process.
      Wine is a psychoactive drug, as are all alcoholic beverages, commonly used for its intoxicating effects today and throughout history. The psychoactive effects of wine are evident at the normal serving size.
      Wines made from produce besides grapes are usually named after the product from which they are produced (for example, rice wine, pomegranate wine, apple wine and elderberry wine) and are generically called fruit wine. The term "wine" can also refer to starch-fermented or fortified beverages having higher alcohol content, such as barley wine, huangjiu, or sake.
      Wine has a rich history dating back thousands of years, with the earliest production so far discovered having occurred c. 6000 BC in Georgia. It had reached the Balkans by c. 4500 BC and was consumed and celebrated in ancient Greece and Rome.
      From its earliest appearance in written records, wine has also played an important role in religion. Red wine was closely associated with blood by the ancient Egyptians, who, according to Plutarch, avoided its free consumption as late as the 7th-century BC Saite dynasty, "thinking it to be the blood of those who had once battled against the gods". The Greek cult and mysteries of Dionysus, carried on by the Romans in their Bacchanalia, were the origins of western theater. Judaism incorporates it in the Kiddush and Christianity in its Eucharist, while alcohol consumption is forbidden in Islam.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Pre-Cana
    Connects To Wine

    • The name is derived from John 2:1–12, the wedding feast at Cana in Galilee, where Jesus performed the miracle of turning water into wine. from Pre-Cana

    1. 8
      Jesus Jesus (/ˈdʒiːzəs/; Greek: Ἰησοῦς Iesous; 6–4 BC to 30–33 AD), also referred to as Jesus of Nazareth, is the central…
    1. 8

      Jesus (/ˈdʒiːzəs/; Greek: Ἰησοῦς Iesous; 6–4 BC to 30–33 AD), also referred to as Jesus of Nazareth, is the central figure of Christianity, whom the teachings of most Christian denominations hold to be the Son of God. Christianity regards Jesus as the awaited Messiah of the Old Testament and refers to him as Jesus Christ, a name that is also used in non-Christian contexts.…

      SHOW MORE

      Jesus (/ˈdʒiːzəs/; Greek: Ἰησοῦς Iesous; 6–4 BC to 30–33 AD), also referred to as Jesus of Nazareth, is the central figure of Christianity, whom the teachings of most Christian denominations hold to be the Son of God. Christianity regards Jesus as the awaited Messiah of the Old Testament and refers to him as Jesus Christ, a name that is also used in non-Christian contexts.
      Virtually all modern scholars of antiquity agree that Jesus existed historically, although the quest for the historical Jesus has produced little agreement on the historical reliability of the Gospels and on how closely the biblical Jesus reflects the historical Jesus. Most scholars agree that Jesus was a Jewish rabbi from Galilee who preached his message orally, was baptized by John the Baptist, and was crucified in Jerusalem on the orders of the Roman prefect, Pontius Pilate. Scholars have constructed various portraits of the historical Jesus, which often depict him as having one or more of the following roles: the leader of an apocalyptic movement, Messiah, a charismatic healer, a sage and philosopher, or an egalitarian social reformer. Scholars have correlated the New Testament accounts with non-Christian historical records to arrive at an estimated chronology of Jesus' life. The most widely used calendar era in the world (abbreviated as "AD", alternatively referred to as "CE"), counts from a medieval estimate of the birth year of Jesus.
      Christians believe that Jesus has a "unique significance" in the world. Christian doctrines include the beliefs that Jesus was conceived by the Holy Spirit, was born of a virgin, performed miracles, founded the Church, died by crucifixion as a sacrifice to achieve atonement, rose from the dead, and ascended into heaven, whence he will return. The great majority of Christians worship Jesus as the incarnation of God the Son, the second of three persons of a Divine Trinity. A few Christian groups reject Trinitarianism, wholly or partly, as non-scriptural.
      In Islam, Jesus (commonly transliterated as Isa) is considered one of God's important prophets and the Messiah. To Muslims, Jesus is a bringer of scripture and was born of a virgin, but neither the Son of God nor the victim of crucifixion. According to the Quran, Jesus was not crucified but was physically raised into the heavens by God. Judaism rejects the Christian and Islamic belief that Jesus was the awaited Messiah, arguing that he did not fulfill the Messianic prophecies in the Tanakh.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Pre-Cana
    Connects To Jesus

    • The name is derived from John 2:1–12, the wedding feast at Cana in Galilee, where Jesus performed the miracle of turning water into wine. from Pre-Cana

    1. 9
      Catholicism Catholicism (from Greek καθολικισμός, katholikismos, "according to the whole") is used as a broad term for…
    1. 9

      Catholicism (from Greek καθολικισμός, katholikismos, "according to the whole") is used as a broad term for describing specific traditions in the Christian churches in theology and doctrine, liturgy, ethics and spirituality.…

      SHOW MORE

      Catholicism (from Greek καθολικισμός, katholikismos, "according to the whole") is used as a broad term for describing specific traditions in the Christian churches in theology and doctrine, liturgy, ethics and spirituality.
      In this sense, it is to be distinguished from the sense in which it denotes Christians and churches, western and eastern, that are in full communion with the Holy See, and that are commonly called the Catholic Church or Roman Catholic Church.
      In the sense of indicating historical continuity of faith and practice from the first millennium, the term "Catholicism" is at times employed to mark a contrast to Protestantism, which tends to look solely to the Bible as interpreted on the principles of the 16th-century Protestant Reformation as its ultimate standard. It was thus used by the Oxford Movement.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Pre-Cana
    Connects To Catholicism

    • Approaches to Pre-Cana vary among Catholic dioceses and parishes. from Pre-Cana

    1. 10
      Water Water is a transparent fluid which forms the world's streams, lakes, oceans and rain, and is the major constituent…
    1. 10

      Water is a transparent fluid which forms the world's streams, lakes, oceans and rain, and is the major constituent of the fluids of living things. As a chemical compound, a water molecule contains one oxygen and two hydrogen atoms that are connected by covalent bonds. Water is a liquid at standard ambient temperature and pressure, but it often co-exists on Earth with its solid state, ice; and gaseous state, steam (water vapor).…

      SHOW MORE

      Water is a transparent fluid which forms the world's streams, lakes, oceans and rain, and is the major constituent of the fluids of living things. As a chemical compound, a water molecule contains one oxygen and two hydrogen atoms that are connected by covalent bonds. Water is a liquid at standard ambient temperature and pressure, but it often co-exists on Earth with its solid state, ice; and gaseous state, steam (water vapor).
      Water covers 71% of the Earth's surface. It is vital for all known forms of life. On Earth, 96.5% of the planet's water is found in seas and oceans, 1.7% in groundwater, 1.7% in glaciers and the ice caps of Antarctica and Greenland, a small fraction in other large water bodies, and 0.001% in the air as vapor, clouds (formed of solid and liquid water particles suspended in air), and precipitation. Only 2.5% of the Earth's water is freshwater, and 98.8% of that water is in ice and groundwater. Less than 0.3% of all freshwater is in rivers, lakes, and the atmosphere, and an even smaller amount of the Earth's freshwater (0.003%) is contained within biological bodies and manufactured products.
      Water on Earth moves continually through the water cycle of evaporation and transpiration (evapotranspiration), condensation, precipitation, and runoff, usually reaching the sea. Evaporation and transpiration contribute to the precipitation over land. Water used in the production of a good or service is known as virtual water.
      Safe drinking water is essential to humans and other lifeforms even though it provides no calories or organic nutrients. Access to safe drinking water has improved over the last decades in almost every part of the world, but approximately one billion people still lack access to safe water and over 2.5 billion lack access to adequate sanitation. There is a clear correlation between access to safe water and gross domestic product per capita. However, some observers have estimated that by 2025 more than half of the world population will be facing water-based vulnerability. A report, issued in November 2009, suggests that by 2030, in some developing regions of the world, water demand will exceed supply by 50%. Water plays an important role in the world economy, as it functions as a solvent for a wide variety of chemical substances and facilitates industrial cooling and transportation. Approximately 70% of the fresh water used by humans goes to agriculture.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Pre-Cana
    Connects To Water

    • The name is derived from John 2:1–12, the wedding feast at Cana in Galilee, where Jesus performed the miracle of turning water into wine. from Pre-Cana

    1. 11
      Parish A parish is a church territorial unit constituting a division of a diocese. A parish is under the pastoral care and…
    1. 11

      A parish is a church territorial unit constituting a division of a diocese. A parish is under the pastoral care and clerical jurisdiction of a parish priest, who might be assisted by one or more curates, and who operates from a parish church. Historically, a parish often covered the same geographical area as a manor (whilst still being defined by the parish church).…

      SHOW MORE

      A parish is a church territorial unit constituting a division of a diocese. A parish is under the pastoral care and clerical jurisdiction of a parish priest, who might be assisted by one or more curates, and who operates from a parish church. Historically, a parish often covered the same geographical area as a manor (whilst still being defined by the parish church).
      By extension the term parish refers not only to the territorial unit but to the people of its community or congregation as well as to church property within it. In England this church property was technically in the ownership of the parish priest, vested in him on his institution to that parish.

      SHOW LESS
    SHOW MORE

    How Pre-Cana
    Connects To Parish

    • Online programs have emerged as an alternative to gathered events as parishes and dioceses cope with fewer resources, geographically expanding congregations and deployed military couples. from Pre-Cana

    • Approaches to Pre-Cana vary among Catholic dioceses and parishes. from Pre-Cana

Books loading, please wait...
Mediander uses proprietary software that curates millions of interconnected topics to produce the MedianderConnects search results. As with any algorithmic search, anomalous results may occur. If you notice such an anomaly, or have any comments or suggestions, please contact us.