Edward III (13 November 1312 – 21 June 1377) was King of England from 25 January 1327 until his death; he is noted for his military success and for restoring royal authority after the disastrous reign of his father, Edward II. Edward III transformed the Kingdom of England into one of the most formidable military powers in Europe. His long reign of fifty years also saw vital developments in legislation and government—in particular the evolution of the English parliament—as well as the ravages of the Black Death.

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  • 1. [Lionel of Antwerp, 1st Duke of Clarence]
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    Lionel of Antwerp, 1st Duke of Clarence, jure uxoris 4th Earl of Ulster and 5th Baron of Connaught, KG (Norman French: Leonell Duc de Clarence; 29 November 1338 – 7 October 1368) was the third son, but the second son to survive infancy, of Edward III of England and Philippa of Hainault. He was named
    Lionel of Antwerp, 1st Duke of Clarence, jure uxoris 4th Earl of Ulster and 5th Baron of Connaught, KG (Norman French: Leonell Duc de Clarence; 29 November 1338 – 7 October 1368) was the third son, but the second son to survive infancy, of Edward III of England and Philippa of Hainault. He was named for his birthplace, at Antwerp in Flanders. Prince Lionel was born of a Flemish mother and was a grandson of William I, Count of Hainaut. He grew to be nearly seven feet in height and had an athletic build.

    How Edward III of England
    Connects To Lionel of Antwerp, 1st Duke of Clarence

    • Lionel of Antwerp, 1st Duke of Clarence, jure uxoris 4th Earl of Ulster and 5th Baron of Connaught, KG (29 November 1338 – 7 October 1368) was the third son, but the second son to survive infancy, of Edward III of England and Philippa of Hainault. from Lionel of Antwerp, 1st Duke of Clarence

    • Roger Mortimer, born 11 April 1374 at Usk in Monmouthshire, was the eldest son of Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March, by his wife Philippa Plantagenet, who as the daughter of Lionel of Antwerp, 1st Duke of Clarence, and granddaughter of King Edward III, had a claim to the crown which she passed on to her children. from Roger Mortimer, 4th Earl of March

    • Anne Mortimer was thus a descendant of Edward I and Henry III through her mother, and more importantly, a descendant of King Edward III through her grandparents, Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March, and Philippa of Clarence, daughter of King Edward III's second surviving son, Lionel of Antwerp. from Anne de Mortimer

    • Edmund Mortimer was thus a descendant of Henry III and Edward I and a half-great-nephew of Richard II through his mother, and more importantly a descendant of King Edward III through his paternal grandmother Philippa of Clarence, only daughter of King Edward III's second surviving son, Lionel of Antwerp, 1st Duke of Clarence. from Edmund Mortimer, 5th Earl of March

    • When Richard II was forced to abdicate the throne in 1399, Henry was next in line to the throne according to Edward III's entailment of 1376; but the heir of the royal estate according to the common law was Edmund Mortimer, 5th Earl of March, who descended from the daughter of Edward III's second son, Lionel of Antwerp. from Henry IV of England

    • Mortimer was the great-grandson of Lionel of Antwerp, 1st Duke of Clarence, second surviving son of King Edward III, and his claim to the throne was thus superior to that of Henry V and his father, Henry IV, who derived their claim from Henry IV's father, John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster, third surviving son of Edward III. from Southampton Plot

    • His mother Anne was the daughter of Roger Mortimer, 4th Earl of March and Eleanor Holland, and was the great granddaughter of Lionel of Antwerp, the second surviving son of Edward III. from Richard of York, 3rd Duke of York

    • Roger Mortimer had a claim to the crown through his mother, Philippa Plantagenet, daughter of Lionel of Antwerp, 1st Duke of Clarence, and granddaughter of King Edward III. from Alianore Holland, Countess of March

    • Her mother was Philippa Plantagenet, the only daughter of Lionel of Antwerp and thus a granddaughter of Edward III. from Richard FitzAlan, 11th Earl of Arundel

    • Elizabeth Mortimer, Baroness Camoys (12 February 1371 – 20 April 1417) was an English noblewoman, who, as the granddaughter of Lionel of Antwerp, 1st Duke of Clarence, and great-granddaughter of King Edward III, was in the line of succession to the English crown. from Elizabeth Mortimer

    • The House of York was descended in the male line from Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York, the fourth surviving son of Edward III, but also represented Edward's senior line, being cognatic descendants of Lionel, Duke of Clarence, Edward III's second surviving son. from House of York

    • Richard of York was not only the wealthiest magnate in the land, but was also descended through his mother from King Edward III's third son Lionel of Antwerp and through his father from Edward III's fifth son Edmund of Langley, leading to calls that he be recognised as successor to the childless King Henry. from Battle of Wakefield

    • The title was first granted to Lionel of Antwerp, the second son of King Edward III, in 1362. from Duke of Clarence

    • Among their grievances was the King's failure to pay the wages due to them for defending the Scottish border, his favour towards Dunbar, his demand that the Percys hand over their Scottish prisoners, his failure to put an end to Owain Glyn Dŵr's rebellion through a negotiated settlement, his increasing promotion of his son Prince Henry's military authority in Wales, and his failure to ransom the Percys' kinsman, Henry Percy's brother-in-law, Sir Edmund Mortimer (1376–1409), whom the Welsh had captured in June 1402, and who had a claim to the crown as the grandson of Lionel, Duke of Clarence, second surviving son of King Edward III. from Henry Percy (Hotspur)

    • She married Lionel of Antwerp, third son of Edward III of England. from William Donn de Burgh, 3rd Earl of Ulster

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