Edward III (13 November 1312 – 21 June 1377) was King of England from 25 January 1327 until his death; he is noted for his military success and for restoring royal authority after the disastrous reign of his father, Edward II. Edward III transformed the Kingdom of England into one of the most formidable military powers in Europe; his reign also saw vital developments in legislation and government—in particular the evolution of the English parliament—as well as the ravages of the Black Death. He is one of only six British monarchs to have ruled England or its successor kingdoms for more than fifty years.

FULL ARTICLE
  • 1. [Battle of Crécy]
    Videos

    The Battle of Crécy (occasionally written in English as the "Battle of Cressy") took place on 26 August 1346 near Crécy in northern France. It was one of the most important battles of the Hundred Years' War because of the combination of new weapons and tactics used.
    The Battle of Crécy (occasionally written in English as the "Battle of Cressy") took place on 26 August 1346 near Crécy in northern France. It was one of the most important battles of the Hundred Years' War because of the combination of new weapons and tactics used.
    The English knights knew the importance of being willing to fight dismounted elbow to elbow with the pikemen and archers, a procedure which was learned from the earlier Saxons and also by their battles with the Scots from whom they learned tactical flexibility and the adaptation to difficult terrain. All of these factors made Edward III's army powerful, even when outnumbered by the French forces.

    How Edward III of England
    Connects To Battle of Crécy

    • On 26 August, the English army defeated a far larger French army in the Battle of Crécy. from Edward III of England

    • Following some initial setbacks the war went exceptionally well for England; victories at Crécy and Poitiers led to the highly favourable Treaty of Brétigny. from Edward III of England

    • All of these factors made Edward III's army powerful, even when outnumbered by the French forces. from Battle of Crécy

    • John de Vere was a trusted captain of Edward III in the king's wars in Scotland and France, and took part in both the Battle of Crécy and the Battle of Poitiers. from John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford

    • John was a captain in King Edward III's army, and as such participated in the Battle of Crécy and the Battle of Poitiers. from Maud de Badlesmere, Countess of Oxford

    • The commander of the Anglo-Breton faction was Sir Thomas Dagworth, a veteran professional soldier who had served with his overlord King Edward III for many years and was trusted to conduct the Breton war in an effective manner whilst Edward was raising funds in England and planning the invasion of Normandy for the following year, which would eventually result in the crushing battle of Crécy. from Battle of St Pol de Léon

    • England's Edward III, after a victory in the Battle of Crécy, laid siege to Calais, while Philip VI of France ordered the city to hold out at all costs. from The Burghers of Calais

    • John Dawney served in King Edward III's expedition to Honfleur in 1346, and fought at the Battle of Crécy on 26 August 1346, for which he was made a knight banneret. from John Dawney

    • The Black Prince was knighted in the local church by his father, King Edward III of England on July 12th, 1346 prior to the Battle of Crécy. from Quettehou

    • Northburgh accompanied King Edward III of England on the English expedition to France which included the Battle of Crécy (1346) and acted as royal clerk, writing an eyewitness account in a newsletter from the English camp, and giving the French casualties as 1,542 "without reckoning the commons and foot-soldiers". from Michael Northburgh

    • Calais fell after the Battle of Crécy in 1346 to Edward III of England following a desperate siege. from Pale of Calais

    • The Military Knights of Windsor were constituted by King Edward III following the Battle of Crécy, when many knights captured by the French were forced to liquidate their estates to raise ransom money in order to secure their release. from Military Knights of Windsor

    • Scene 6 As they march through the north of France, the prime minister remarks that the army’s route near to Crecy follows that of King Edward III. from Kuningas lähtee Ranskaan

    • The river featured in the 1346 withdrawal of Edward III's army, which forded the river at the battle of Blanchetaque during the campaign which culminated in the Battle of Crécy. from River Somme

    • In the first phase Edward III won some extraordinary victories against the French, most notably at Crécy and Sluys. from Dual monarchy of England and France

Mediander uses proprietary software that curates millions of interconnected topics to produce the MedianderConnects search results. As with any algorithmic search, anomalous results may occur. If you notice such an anomaly, or have any comments or suggestions, please contact us.