Edward III (13 November 1312 – 21 June 1377) was King of England from 25 January 1327 until his death; he is noted for his military success and for restoring royal authority after the disastrous reign of his father, Edward II. Edward III transformed the Kingdom of England into one of the most formidable military powers in Europe. His long reign of fifty years also saw vital developments in legislation and government—in particular the evolution of the English parliament—as well as the ravages of the Black Death.

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  • 1. [Battle of Crécy]
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    The Battle of Crécy (26 August 1346) was an important English victory during the Edwardian phase of the Hundred Years' War. Coupled with the later battles of Poitiers (also fought during the Edwardian phase) and Agincourt, it formed the first of three decisive English successes during the conflict.
    The Battle of Crécy (26 August 1346) was an important English victory during the Edwardian phase of the Hundred Years' War. Coupled with the later battles of Poitiers (also fought during the Edwardian phase) and Agincourt, it formed the first of three decisive English successes during the conflict.
    The battle was fought on 26 August 1346 near Crécy in northern France. An army of English, Welsh and allied troops from the Holy Roman Empire led by Edward III of England engaged and defeated a much larger army of French, Genoese and Majorcan troops led by Philip VI of France. Emboldened by the lessons of tactical flexibility and utilisation of terrain learned from the earlier Saxons, Vikings and the recent battles with the Scots, the English army, despite being heavily outnumbered by the French, won a decisive victory.
    The battle saw the rise in power of the longbow as the dominant Western European battlefield weapon, whose effects were devastating when used en-masse. Crécy also saw the use of some very early cannon by the English army, shot being found on the battlefield centuries later during archaeological digs. The combined-arms approach of the English, the new weapons and tactics used, which was far more focused on the infantry than previous battles in the middle-ages (whose predominant focus was the heavily armoured knight) and the killing of incapacitated knights by peasantry after the battle has led to the engagement being described as "the beginning of the end of chivalry".
    The battle crippled the French army's ability to come to the aid of Calais, which fell to the English the following year. Calais would remain under English rule for over two centuries, falling in 1558.

    How Edward III of England
    Connects To Battle of Crécy

    • On 26 August, the English army defeated a far larger French army in the Battle of Crécy. from Edward III of England

    • Following some initial setbacks the war went exceptionally well for England; victories at Crécy and Poitiers led to the highly favourable Treaty of Brétigny. from Edward III of England

    • Edward himself commanded the division behind, while the rear division was led by William de Bohun, Earl of Northampton. from Battle of Crécy

    • The English army was led by Edward III, primarily comprising English and Welsh troops along with allied Breton and German mercenaries. from Battle of Crécy

    • An army of English, Welsh and allied troops from the Holy Roman Empire led by Edward III engaged and defeated a much larger army of French, Genoese and Majorcan troops led by Philip VI. from Battle of Crécy

    • John de Vere was a trusted captain of Edward III in the king's wars in Scotland and France, and took part in both the Battle of Crécy and the Battle of Poitiers. from John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford

    • John was a captain in King Edward III's army, and as such participated in the Battle of Crécy and the Battle of Poitiers. from Maud de Badlesmere, Countess of Oxford

    • The commander of the Anglo-Breton faction was Sir Thomas Dagworth, a veteran professional soldier who had served with his overlord King Edward III for many years and was trusted to conduct the Breton war in an effective manner whilst Edward was raising funds in England and planning the invasion of Normandy for the following year, which would eventually result in the crushing battle of Crécy. from Battle of St Pol de Léon

    • England's Edward III, after a victory in the Battle of Crécy, laid siege to Calais, while Philip VI of France ordered the city to hold out at all costs. from The Burghers of Calais

    • Calais fell after the Battle of Crécy in 1346 to Edward III of England following a desperate siege. from Pale of Calais

    • John Dawney served in King Edward III's expedition to Honfleur in 1346, and fought at the Battle of Crécy on 26 August 1346, for which he was made a knight banneret. from John Dawney

    • The river featured in the 1346 withdrawal of Edward III's army, which forded the river at the battle of Blanchetaque during the campaign which culminated in the Battle of Crécy. from River Somme

    • When his father was killed at the Battle of Crécy against the troops of King Edward III of England in 1346, he inherited the French counties of Flanders, Nevers, and Rethel (as Louis III). from Louis II, Count of Flanders

    • Northburgh accompanied King Edward III of England on the English expedition to France which included the Battle of Crécy (1346) and acted as royal clerk, writing an eyewitness account in a newsletter from the English camp, and giving the French casualties as 1,542 "without reckoning the commons and foot-soldiers". from Michael Northburgh

    • In the first phase Edward III won some extraordinary victories against the French, most notably at Crécy and Sluys. from Dual monarchy of England and France

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