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A crossword is a word puzzle that normally takes the form of a square or a rectangular grid of white and black shaded squares. The goal is to fill the white squares with letters, forming words or phrases, by solving clues which lead to the answers. In languages that are written left-to-right, the answer words and phrases are placed in the grid from left to right and from top to bottom. The shaded squares are used to separate the words or phrases.

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      Sudoku Sudoku (数独, sūdoku, Digit-single) /suːˈdoʊkuː/, originally called Number Place, is a logic-based, combinatorial…
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      Sudoku (数独, sūdoku, Digit-single) /suːˈdoʊkuː/, originally called Number Place, is a logic-based, combinatorial number-placement puzzle. The objective is to fill a 9×9 grid with digits so that each column, each row, and each of the nine 3×3 sub-grids that compose the grid (also called "boxes", "blocks", "regions", or "sub-squares") contains all of the digits from 1 to 9. The puzzle setter provides a partially completed grid, which for a well-posed puzzle has a unique solution.…

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      Sudoku (数独, sūdoku, Digit-single) /suːˈdoʊkuː/, originally called Number Place, is a logic-based, combinatorial number-placement puzzle. The objective is to fill a 9×9 grid with digits so that each column, each row, and each of the nine 3×3 sub-grids that compose the grid (also called "boxes", "blocks", "regions", or "sub-squares") contains all of the digits from 1 to 9. The puzzle setter provides a partially completed grid, which for a well-posed puzzle has a unique solution.
      Completed puzzles are always a type of Latin square with an additional constraint on the contents of individual regions. For example, the same single integer may not appear twice in the same row, column or in any of the nine 3×3 subregions of the 9x9 playing board.
      The puzzle was popularized in 1986 by the Japanese puzzle company Nikoli, under the name Sudoku, meaning single number. It became an international hit in 2005.

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    How Crossword
    Connects To Sudoku

    • Knowing that British newspapers have a long history of publishing crosswords and other puzzles, he promoted Sudoku to The Times in Britain, which launched it on November 12, 2004 (calling it Su Doku). from Sudoku

    • Nonograms are also known by many other names, including Paint by Numbers, Griddlers, Pic-a-Pix, Picross, PrismaPixels, Pixel Puzzles, Crucipixel, Edel, FigurePic, Hanjie, HeroGlyphix, Illust-Logic, Japanese Crosswords, Japanese Puzzles, Kare Karala!, Logic Art, Logic Square, Logicolor, Logik-Puzzles, Logimage, Oekaki Logic, Oekaki-Mate, Paint Logic, Picture Logic, Tsunamii, Paint by Sudoku and Binary Coloring Books. from Nonogram

    • The mystery hunt employs a wide range of puzzles including crosswords, cryptic crosswords, logic puzzles, jigsaw puzzles, anagrams, connect-the-dots, ciphers, riddles, paint by numbers, sudokus, and word searches. from MIT Mystery Hunt

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    • Puzzle books may contain puzzles all of simply one type like (e.g. crosswords or sudoku) or a mixture of different puzzle types. from Puzzle book

    • Uclick products include crosswords and other word games, number placement puzzles like Sudoku and Kakuro, jigsaw puzzles and other casual games. from Uclick

    • His works include the Puzzle Lady and the Stanley Hastings series, as well as the screenplay to the 1984 cult classic, C.H.U.D. He has collaborated with Manny Nosowsky for crossword puzzles and with Will Shortz for sudoku puzzles incorporated in Puzzle Lady stories. from Parnell Hall (writer)

    • Applications pre-loaded on the Nook Color include Chess, Sudoku, crossword puzzles, Pandora Radio, and a media gallery for viewing pictures and video. from Nook Color

    • Puzzlewright Press creates puzzle and game titles covering sudoku, crosswords, chess, kakuro, wordoku, mazes, logic puzzles, cryptograms, casino games, card games, and magic tricks. from Sterling Publishing

    • Also included are entertainment features such as sudokus, crosswords, and holiday-themed recipes. from Student (magazine)

    • In others he has been seen setting decoys, completing a sudoku puzzle, completing a crossword puzzle (to Jon's amazement), writing poetry, and while playing as superheros with Garfield, finding a complete outfit to one-up Garfield's cape. from Odie

    • Ka Leo O Hawai‘i publishes a variety of popular puzzles including: sudoku, Pathem™ & crosswords. from Ka Leo O Hawaii

    • Student Life also includes a crossword puzzle and sudoku in each issue, and Police Beat and Pulse (a guide to weekend events) once a week. from Student Life (newspaper)

    • In 2010 the State News published Crosswords, Pathem puzzles, Sudoku, Octo, Wordplay and Word Search puzzles. from The State News

    • She also enjoys crossword puzzles and Sudoku. from Rose McIver

    • Brainwave – The puzzles page, including a crossword, Sudoku and various (Mumma needed) other word games. from MX (newspaper)

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      Will Shortz Will Shortz (born 26 August 1952 in Crawfordsville, Indiana) is an American puzzle creator and editor, and…
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      Will Shortz (born 26 August 1952 in Crawfordsville, Indiana) is an American puzzle creator and editor, and currently the crossword puzzle editor for The New York Times.

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    How Crossword
    Connects To Will Shortz

    • He has been the crossword puzzle editor for The New York Times since 1993 (the fourth in the paper's history, following Eugene Thomas Maleska), and has been the puzzle master on NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday since the program was started in 1987. from Will Shortz

    • It features Will Shortz, the editor of the New York Times crossword puzzle, crossword constructor Merl Reagle, and many other noted crossword solvers and constructors. from Wordplay (film)

    • His film Wordplay, a profile of New York Times crossword editor Will Shortz, premiered at the 2006 Sundance Film Festival and became the second-highest grossing documentary of that year. from Patrick Creadon

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    • His works include the Puzzle Lady and the Stanley Hastings series, as well as the screenplay to the 1984 cult classic, C.H.U.D. He has collaborated with Manny Nosowsky for crossword puzzles and with Will Shortz for sudoku puzzles incorporated in Puzzle Lady stories. from Parnell Hall (writer)

    • The Sunday Magazine also features a puzzle page, edited by Will Shortz, that features a crossword puzzle with a larger grid than those featured in the Times during the week, along with other types of puzzles on a rotating basis (including diagramless crossword puzzles and anacrostics). from The New York Times Magazine

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      Word search A word search, word find, word seek, word sleuth or mystery word puzzle is a word game that consists of the letters…
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      A word search, word find, word seek, word sleuth or mystery word puzzle is a word game that consists of the letters of words placed in a grid, which usually has a rectangular or square shape. The objective of this puzzle is to find and mark all the words hidden inside the box. The words…

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      A word search, word find, word seek, word sleuth or mystery word puzzle is a word game that consists of the letters of words placed in a grid, which usually has a rectangular or square shape. The objective of this puzzle is to find and mark all the words hidden inside the box. The words may be placed horizontally, vertically, or diagonally. Often a list of the hidden words is provided, but more challenging puzzles may let the player figure them out. Many word search puzzles have a theme to which all the hidden words are related. The puzzles have, like crosswords and arrowords, have been very popular in the United Kingdom, and - also in common with these latter puzzles - have had complete magazines devoted to them.
      Word searches are commonly found in daily newspapers and puzzle books. Some teachers use them as educational tools for children, the benefit being that young minds can learn new words and their spellings by intensively searching for them, letter by letter, in the puzzle.

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    How Crossword
    Connects To Word search

    • The puzzles have, like crosswords and arrowords, have been very popular in the United Kingdom, and - also in common with these latter puzzles - have had complete magazines devoted to them. from Word search

    • Puzzles may be anything from traditional puzzles like crosswords, word searches, cryptograms, jigsaw puzzles, word play and logic problems to wandering around campus to find landmarks or puzzles that have to be solved on location. from Microsoft Puzzle Hunt

    • Word puzzles, including anagrams, ciphers, crossword puzzles, and word search puzzles. from Puzzle

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    • The mystery hunt employs a wide range of puzzles including crosswords, cryptic crosswords, logic puzzles, jigsaw puzzles, anagrams, connect-the-dots, ciphers, riddles, paint by numbers, sudokus, and word searches. from MIT Mystery Hunt

    • These games include Criss Cross, a crossword-type puzzle, Flash Cards, where the player must recall the word shown, and a word search. from Spellbound!

    • As well as including features, the magazine may include puzzles, such as sudokus, crosswords, word search or arrowords. from Chat (magazine)

    • Traditional Puzzles such as crosswords, wordsearches, chess and Scrabble. from BBC MindGames Magazine

    • In addition to acting, Tatar created word searches and compiled crossword puzzles for the publishing firm, Dell Publishing. from Benjamin Tatar

    • In 2010 the State News published Crosswords, Pathem puzzles, Sudoku, Octo, Wordplay and Word Search puzzles. from The State News

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      American Crossword Puzzle Tournament The American Crossword Puzzle Tournament is a crossword-solving tournament held annually in late February or early…
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      The American Crossword Puzzle Tournament is a crossword-solving tournament held annually in late February or early March. Founded in 1978 by Will Shortz, who still directs the tournament, it is the oldest and largest crossword tournament held in the United States; the 2009 event attracted nearly 700 competitors. The 37th annual tournament took place on March 7–9, 2014.…

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      The American Crossword Puzzle Tournament is a crossword-solving tournament held annually in late February or early March. Founded in 1978 by Will Shortz, who still directs the tournament, it is the oldest and largest crossword tournament held in the United States; the 2009 event attracted nearly 700 competitors. The 37th annual tournament took place on March 7–9, 2014.
      For 30 years the contest was held at the Marriott in Stamford, Connecticut, but owing to increasing popularity, in 2008 it moved to the larger Marriott Brooklyn Bridge in Brooklyn, New York. Beginning in 2015 the tournament will again be in Stamford.
      The tournament traditionally begins Friday evening with social games and a wine-and-cheese reception. More social games are played on Saturday evening, many of them adaptations of television game shows.

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    How Crossword
    Connects To American Crossword Puzzle Tournament

    • In 1978 Shortz founded and still directs the annual American Crossword Puzzle Tournament. from Crossword

    • The American Crossword Puzzle Tournament is a crossword-solving tournament held annually in late February or early March. from American Crossword Puzzle Tournament

    • Tyler Hinman (born November 5, 1984) is a crossword solver and constructor and a five-time winner of the American Crossword Puzzle Tournament (ACPT). from Tyler Hinman

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      Arthur Wynne Arthur Wynne (June 22, 1871 – January 14, 1945) was the British-born inventor of the modern crossword puzzle.
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      Arthur Wynne (June 22, 1871 – January 14, 1945) was the British-born inventor of the modern crossword puzzle.

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    How Crossword
    Connects To Arthur Wynne

    • On December 21, 1913, Arthur Wynne, a journalist from Liverpool, England, published a "word-cross" puzzle in the New York World that embodied most of the features of the genre as we know it. from Crossword

    • He is best known for the invention of the crossword puzzle in 1913, when he was a resident of Cedar Grove, New Jersey. from Arthur Wynne

    • Arthur Wynne (June 22, 1871 January 14, 1945) was the British-born inventor of the modern crossword puzzle. from Arthur Wynne

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      Puzzle A puzzle is a game, problem, or toy that tests a person's ingenuity. In a puzzle, one is required to put pieces…
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      A puzzle is a game, problem, or toy that tests a person's ingenuity. In a puzzle, one is required to put pieces together, in a logical way, in order to arrive at the correct solution of the puzzle. There are different types of puzzles for different ages.…

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      A puzzle is a game, problem, or toy that tests a person's ingenuity. In a puzzle, one is required to put pieces together, in a logical way, in order to arrive at the correct solution of the puzzle. There are different types of puzzles for different ages.
      Puzzles are often devised as a form of entertainment but they can also arise from serious mathematical or logistical problems. In such cases, their solution may be a significant contribution to mathematical research.
      Solutions of puzzles often require the recognition of patterns and the creation of a particular kind of order. People with a high level of inductive reasoning aptitude may be better at solving such puzzles than others. But puzzles based upon inquiry and discovery may be solved more easily by those with good deduction skills. Deductive reasoning improves with practice.
      Some notable creators of puzzles are Sam Loyd, Henry Dudeney, Boris Kordemsky and, more recently, David J. Bodycombe, Will Shortz, Lloyd King, and Martin Gardner.

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    How Crossword
    Connects To Puzzle

    • A crossword is a word puzzle that normally takes the form of a square or a rectangular grid of white and black shaded squares. from Crossword

    • Word puzzles, including anagrams, ciphers, crossword puzzles, and word search puzzles. from Puzzle

    • A cross-figure (also variously called cross number puzzle or figure logic) is a puzzle similar to a crossword in structure, but with entries which consist of numbers rather than words, with individual digits being entered in the blank cells. from Cross-figure

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    • Ka Leo O Hawai‘i publishes a variety of popular puzzles including: sudoku, Pathem™ & crosswords. from Ka Leo O Hawaii

    • Puzzles such as eight queens puzzle, crosswords, verbal arithmetic, Sudoku, Peg Solitaire. from Backtracking

    • His activities brought him at a beach in time to see Alice playing with a crossword puzzle. from Pete (Disney)

    • Wilder loved puzzles: he created his own cryptic crosswords, and could spend hours with a jigsaw puzzle. from Alec Wilder

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      Wordplay (film) Wordplay is a 2006 documentary film directed by Patrick Creadon. It features Will Shortz, the editor of the New…
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      Wordplay is a 2006 documentary film directed by Patrick Creadon. It features Will Shortz, the editor of the New York Times crossword puzzle, crossword constructor Merl Reagle, and many other noted crossword solvers and constructors. The second half of the movie is set at the 2005 American Crossword Puzzle Tournament (ACPT), where the top solvers compete for a prize of $4000.…

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      Wordplay is a 2006 documentary film directed by Patrick Creadon. It features Will Shortz, the editor of the New York Times crossword puzzle, crossword constructor Merl Reagle, and many other noted crossword solvers and constructors. The second half of the movie is set at the 2005 American Crossword Puzzle Tournament (ACPT), where the top solvers compete for a prize of $4000.
      The movie focuses on the following crossword solvers:
      The movie contains appearances by many celebrity fans of the Times puzzle, including Bill Clinton, Bob Dole, Jon Stewart, Ken Burns, Mike Mussina, Daniel Okrent, and the Indigo Girls.
      A 2008 episode of The Simpsons, "Homer and Lisa Exchange Cross Words", is based on the film. James L. Brooks got the inspiration for the episode after watching Wordplay. "We felt both Will and Merl were very compelling, off-the-beaten-track personalities [in Wordplay], who would fit into our universe very well," Brooks said. The episode was written by Tim Long, and directed by Nancy Kruse, and guest starred crossword puzzle creators Merl Reagle and Will Shortz as themselves.
      Wordplay features a theme song, "Every Word," written and performed by Gary Louris of The Jayhawks. The Wordplay DVD features a music video of "Every Word."

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    How Crossword
    Connects To Wordplay (film)

    • Wordplay (film), a 2006 documentary film about crossword puzzles. from Crossword

    • It features Will Shortz, the editor of the New York Times crossword puzzle, crossword constructor Merl Reagle, and many other noted crossword solvers and constructors. from Wordplay (film)

    • His film Wordplay, a profile of New York Times crossword editor Will Shortz, premiered at the 2006 Sundance Film Festival and became the second-highest grossing documentary of that year. from Patrick Creadon

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    • The duo also appear in the 2006 documentary Wordplay, where they discuss their reaction to appearing in a New York Times crossword puzzle and then begin to solve one together. from Indigo Girls

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      Kakuro Kakuro or Kakkuro (Japanese: カックロ) is a kind of logic puzzle that is often referred to as a mathematical…
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      Kakuro or Kakkuro (Japanese: カックロ) is a kind of logic puzzle that is often referred to as a mathematical transliteration of the crossword. Kakuro puzzles are regular features in many math-and-logic puzzle publications in the United States. In 1966, Canadian Jacob E. Funk,an employee of Dell Magazines came up with the original English name Cross

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      Kakuro or Kakkuro (Japanese: カックロ) is a kind of logic puzzle that is often referred to as a mathematical transliteration of the crossword. Kakuro puzzles are regular features in many math-and-logic puzzle publications in the United States. In 1966, Canadian Jacob E. Funk,an employee of Dell Magazines came up with the original English name Cross Sums and other names such as Cross Addition have also been used, but the Japanese name Kakuro, abbreviation of Japanese kasan kurosu (加算クロス, addition cross), seems to have gained general acceptance and the puzzles appear to be titled this way now in most publications. The popularity of Kakuro in Japan is immense, second only to Sudoku among Nikoli's famed logic-puzzle offerings.
      The canonical Kakuro puzzle is played in a grid of filled and barred cells, "black" and "white" respectively. Puzzles are usually 16×16 in size, although these dimensions can vary widely. Apart from the top row and leftmost column which are entirely black, the grid is divided into "entries"—lines of white cells—by the black cells. The black cells contain a diagonal slash from upper-left to lower-right and a number in one or both halves, such that each horizontal entry has a number in the black half-cell to its immediate left and each vertical entry has a number in the black half-cell immediately above it. These numbers, borrowing crossword terminology, are commonly called "clues".
      The objective of the puzzle is to insert a digit from 1 to 9 inclusive into each white cell such that the sum of the numbers in each entry matches the clue associated with it and that no digit is duplicated in any entry. It is that lack of duplication that makes creating Kakuro puzzles with unique solutions possible, and which means solving a Kakuro puzzle involves investigating combinations more, compared to Sudoku in which the focus is on permutations. There is an unwritten rule for making Kakuro puzzles that each clue must have at least two numbers that add up to it. This is because including one number is mathematically trivial when solving Kakuro puzzles; one can simply disregard the number entirely and subtract it from the clue it indicates.
      At least one publisher includes the constraint that a given combination of numbers can only be used once in each grid, but still markets the puzzles as plain Kakuro.
      Some publishers prefer to print their Kakuro grids exactly like crossword grids, with no labeling in the black cells and instead numbering the entries, providing a separate list of the clues akin to a list of crossword clues. (This eliminates the row and column that are entirely black.) This is purely an issue of image and does not affect solving.
      In discussing Kakuro puzzles and tactics, the typical shorthand for referring to an entry is "(clue, in numerals)-in-(number of cells in entry, spelled out)", such as "16-in-two" and "25-in-five". The exception is what would otherwise be called the "45-in-nine"—simply "45" is used, since the "-in-nine" is mathematically implied (nine cells is the longest possible entry, and since it cannot duplicate a digit it must consist of all the digits from 1 to 9 once). Curiously, "3-in-two", "4-in-two", "43-in-eight", and "44-in-eight" are still frequently called as such, despite the "-in-two" and "-in-eight" being equally implied.

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    How Crossword
    Connects To Kakuro

    • Kakuro or Kakkuro ( ) is a kind of logic puzzle that is often referred to as a mathematical transliteration of the crossword. from Kakuro

    • Uclick products include crosswords and other word games, number placement puzzles like Sudoku and Kakuro, jigsaw puzzles and other casual games. from Uclick

    • Puzzlewright Press creates puzzle and game titles covering sudoku, crosswords, chess, kakuro, wordoku, mazes, logic puzzles, cryptograms, casino games, card games, and magic tricks. from Sterling Publishing

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      Margaret Farrar Margaret Petherbridge Farrar (March 23, 1897 – June 11, 1984) was an American journalist and the first crossword…
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      Margaret Petherbridge Farrar (March 23, 1897 – June 11, 1984) was an American journalist and the first crossword puzzle editor for The New York Times (1942–1968). Creator of many of the rules of modern crossword design, she wrote a long-running series of crossword puzzle books including the first book ever published by Simon & Schuster.

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    How Crossword
    Connects To Margaret Farrar

    • The first editor of the New York Times crossword was Margaret Farrar, who was editor from 1942 to 1969. from Crossword

    • Margaret Petherbridge Farrar (March 23, 1897 – June 11, 1984) was an American journalist and the first crossword puzzle editor for The New York Times (1942–1968). from Margaret Farrar

    • In 1926, Farrar married crossword puzzle pioneer Margaret Petherbridge. from John C. Farrar

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      Cryptogram A cryptogram is a type of puzzle that consists of a short piece of encrypted text. Generally the cipher used to…
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      A cryptogram is a type of puzzle that consists of a short piece of encrypted text. Generally the cipher used to encrypt the text is simple enough that cryptogram can be solved by hand. Frequently used are substitution ciphers where each letter is replaced by a different letter or number. To solve the puzzle, one…

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      A cryptogram is a type of puzzle that consists of a short piece of encrypted text. Generally the cipher used to encrypt the text is simple enough that cryptogram can be solved by hand. Frequently used are substitution ciphers where each letter is replaced by a different letter or number. To solve the puzzle, one must recover the original lettering. Though once used in more serious applications, they are now mainly printed for entertainment in newspapers and magazines.
      Other types of classical ciphers are sometimes used to create cryptograms. An example is the book cipher where a book or article is used to encrypt a message.

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    How Crossword
    Connects To Cryptogram

    • Published under various trade names (including Code Breakers, Code Crackers, and Kaidoku), and not to be confused with cryptic crosswords (ciphertext puzzles are commonly known as cryptograms), a cipher crossword replaces the clues for each entry with clues for each white cell of the grid - an integer from 1 to 26 inclusive is printed in the corner of each. from Crossword

    • Puzzles may be anything from traditional puzzles like crosswords, word searches, cryptograms, jigsaw puzzles, word play and logic problems to wandering around campus to find landmarks or puzzles that have to be solved on location. from Microsoft Puzzle Hunt

    • Puzzlewright Press creates puzzle and game titles covering sudoku, crosswords, chess, kakuro, wordoku, mazes, logic puzzles, cryptograms, casino games, card games, and magic tricks. from Sterling Publishing

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      Eugene Thomas Maleska Eugene Thomas Maleska (January 6, 1916 – August 3, 1993) was a U.S. crossword puzzle constructor and editor.The New…
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      Eugene Thomas Maleska (January 6, 1916 – August 3, 1993) was a U.S. crossword puzzle constructor and editor.
      The New York Times had published dozens of crosswords that he had submitted as a freelance contributor. He became the crossword editor for the New York Times in 1977, replacing Will Weng. In 1993, Maleska was succeeded by…

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      Eugene Thomas Maleska (January 6, 1916 – August 3, 1993) was a U.S. crossword puzzle constructor and editor.
      The New York Times had published dozens of crosswords that he had submitted as a freelance contributor. He became the crossword editor for the New York Times in 1977, replacing Will Weng. In 1993, Maleska was succeeded by Will Shortz, who remains New York Times crossword editor to this day. Besides numerous collections of puzzles, Maleska also published Maleska's Favorite Word Games and A Pleasure in Words, which included a chapter on constructing crossword puzzles.

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    How Crossword
    Connects To Eugene Thomas Maleska

    • She was succeeded by Will Weng, who was succeeded by Eugene T. Maleska. from Crossword

    • Eugene Thomas Maleska (January 6, 1916 – August 3, 1993) was a U.S. crossword puzzle constructor and editor. from Eugene Thomas Maleska

    • He has been the crossword puzzle editor for The New York Times since 1993 (the fourth in the paper's history, following Eugene Thomas Maleska), and has been the puzzle master on NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday since the program was started in 1987. from Will Shortz

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      The New York Times crossword puzzle The New York Times crossword puzzle is a daily puzzle published in The New York Times and online at the newspaper's…
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      The New York Times crossword puzzle is a daily puzzle published in The New York Times and online at the newspaper's website. Magmic Games released mobile versions of the puzzle for BlackBerry and iOS devices in 2008 and 2009; and then for Kindle Fire and Nook in 2012. It is also syndicated to more than…

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      The New York Times crossword puzzle is a daily puzzle published in The New York Times and online at the newspaper's website. Magmic Games released mobile versions of the puzzle for BlackBerry and iOS devices in 2008 and 2009; and then for Kindle Fire and Nook in 2012. It is also syndicated to more than 300 other newspapers and journals. The puzzle is created by various freelance constructors and has been edited by Will Shortz since 1993. The puzzle becomes increasingly difficult throughout the week, with the easiest puzzle on Monday and the most difficult puzzle on Saturday. The larger Sunday crossword, which appears in The New York Times Magazine, is an icon in American culture; it is typically intended to be as difficult as a Thursday puzzle. The standard daily crossword is 15 squares × 15 squares, while the Sunday crossword measures 21 squares × 21 squares (previously, 23 × 23 square Sunday puzzles were also accepted; in addition a special set of 25 × 25 Sunday puzzles, with two sets of clues—easy and hard—was published in 1999 to commemorate the upcoming millennium).

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    How Crossword
    Connects To The New York Times crossword puzzle

    • For example, many weekday puzzles (such as the American New York Times crossword puzzle) are 15×15 squares, while weekend puzzles may be 21×21, 23×23, or 25×25. from Crossword

    • Currently, every other week is an acrostic puzzle authored by Emily Cox and Henry Rathvon, with a rotating selection of other puzzles, including diagramless crosswords, Puns and Anagrams, cryptics (a.k.a. "British-style crosswords"), Split Decisions, Spiral Crosswords, word games, and more rarely, other types (some authored by Shortz himself—the only puzzles he has created for the Times during his tenure as crossword editor). from The New York Times crossword puzzle

    • While crosswords became popular in the early 1920s, it was not until 1942 that The New York Times (which initially regarded crosswords as frivolous, calling them "a primitive form of mental exercise") began running a crossword in its Sunday edition. from The New York Times crossword puzzle

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    • The Sunday Magazine also features a puzzle page, edited by Will Shortz, that features a crossword puzzle with a larger grid than those featured in the Times during the week, along with other types of puzzles on a rotating basis (including diagramless crossword puzzles and anacrostics). from The New York Times Magazine

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      Scrabble Scrabble is a word game in which two to four players score points by placing tiles, each bearing a single letter…
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      Scrabble is a word game in which two to four players score points by placing tiles, each bearing a single letter, onto a gameboard which is divided into a 15×15 grid of squares. The tiles must form words which, in crossword fashion, flow left to right in rows or downwards in columns. The words must…

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      Scrabble is a word game in which two to four players score points by placing tiles, each bearing a single letter, onto a gameboard which is divided into a 15×15 grid of squares. The tiles must form words which, in crossword fashion, flow left to right in rows or downwards in columns. The words must be defined in a standard dictionary. Specified reference works (e.g., the Official Tournament and Club Word List, the Official Scrabble Players Dictionary) provide a list of officially permissible words.
      The name Scrabble is a trademark of Hasbro, Inc. in the United States and Canada and has been sold by Hasbro's Parker Brothers division since 1999; prior to 1999 it was sold as a Milton Bradley game. Outside the United States and Canada, Scrabble is a trademark of Mattel. The game is sold in 121 countries and is available in 29 languages; approximately 150 million sets have been sold worldwide and roughly one-third of American homes have a Scrabble set.

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    How Crossword
    Connects To Scrabble

    • The tiles must form words which, in crossword fashion, flow left to right in rows or downwards in columns. from Scrabble

    • Words with Friends is a multi-player word game developed by Zynga with Friends (formerly Newtoy, Inc.). Players can take turns building words crossword-puzzle style with an opponent in a manner similar to the classic board game Scrabble (the rules of the two games are similar, but Words with Friends is not officially associated with the Scrabble brand). from Words with Friends

    • TCD is widely used by British crossword solvers and setters, and by Scrabble players (though it is no longer the official Scrabble dictionary). from Chambers Dictionary

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    • Traditional Puzzles such as crosswords, wordsearches, chess and Scrabble. from BBC MindGames Magazine

    • Pencil and paper games require little or no specialized equipment other than writing materials, though some such games have been commercialized as board games (Scrabble, for instance, is based on the idea of a crossword puzzle, and tic-tac-toe sets with a boxed grid and pieces are available commercially). from Game

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      Will Weng Will Weng (February 25, 1907 – May 2, 1993) was an American journalist and crossword puzzle constructor who served…
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      Will Weng (February 25, 1907 – May 2, 1993) was an American journalist and crossword puzzle constructor who served as crossword puzzle editor for New York Times from 1969-1977.…

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      Will Weng (February 25, 1907 – May 2, 1993) was an American journalist and crossword puzzle constructor who served as crossword puzzle editor for New York Times from 1969-1977.
      Born in Terre Haute, Indiana, he attended Indiana State Teachers College. Weng came to New York City in 1927. He got a master's degree from the Columbia University School of Journalism and joined the Times in 1930 as a reporter. He served as a lieutenant commander in the United States Navy during World War II.
      He succeeded Margaret Farrar and was succeeded by Eugene T. Maleska. Weng died of throat cancer in Manhattan.

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    Connects To Will Weng

    • She was succeeded by Will Weng, who was succeeded by Eugene T. Maleska. from Crossword

    • Will Weng (February 25, 1907 – May 2, 1993) was an American journalist and crossword puzzle constructor who served as crossword puzzle editor for New York Times from 1969-1977. from Will Weng

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      Emily Cox (puzzle writer) Emily Cox is a US puzzle writer. She and her partner, Henry Rathvon, wrote "The Atlantic Puzzler," a cryptic…
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      Emily Cox is a US puzzle writer. She and her partner, Henry Rathvon, wrote "The Atlantic Puzzler," a cryptic crossword featured each month in the magazine The Atlantic Monthly from 1997 to August 2009. (After March 2006, the Puzzler was published solely online at The Atlantic's website.) They also create acrostic puzzles for The New

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      Emily Cox is a US puzzle writer. She and her partner, Henry Rathvon, wrote "The Atlantic Puzzler," a cryptic crossword featured each month in the magazine The Atlantic Monthly from 1997 to August 2009. (After March 2006, the Puzzler was published solely online at The Atlantic's website.) They also create acrostic puzzles for The New York Times, cryptic crosswords for Canada's National Post, various puzzles for the US Airways in-flight magazine, and Sunday crosswords for The Boston Globe. Cox and Rathvon are now also contributing cryptic crosswords to the Wall Street Journal on Saturdays.

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    How Crossword
    Connects To Emily Cox (puzzle writer)

    • Until 2006, the Atlantic Monthly regularly featured a cryptic crossword "puzzler" by Emily Cox and Henry Rathvon, which combines cryptic clues with diabolically ingenious variations on the construction of the puzzle itself. from Crossword

    • He and his partner, Emily Cox, wrote The Atlantic Puzzler, a cryptic crossword featured each month in the magazine The Atlantic Monthly from September 1977 to October 2009. from Henry Rathvon

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      Henry Rathvon Henry Rathvon is a puzzle writer. He and his partner, Emily Cox, wrote The Atlantic Puzzler, a cryptic crossword…
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      Henry Rathvon is a puzzle writer. He and his partner, Emily Cox, wrote The Atlantic Puzzler, a cryptic crossword featured each month in the magazine The Atlantic Monthly from September 1977 to October 2009. (After March 2006, the Puzzler was published solely online at The Atlantic's website.) They also create acrostic puzzles for the New

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      Henry Rathvon is a puzzle writer. He and his partner, Emily Cox, wrote The Atlantic Puzzler, a cryptic crossword featured each month in the magazine The Atlantic Monthly from September 1977 to October 2009. (After March 2006, the Puzzler was published solely online at The Atlantic's website.) They also create acrostic puzzles for the New York Times, cryptic crosswords for Canada's National Post, puzzles for the US Airways in-flight magazine, and (with Henry Hook) Sunday crosswords for the Boston Globe.
      In 2005, Rathvon's play Trapezium, a comedy in iambic pentameter, was produced by the Orlando-UCF Shakespeare Festival.

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    How Crossword
    Connects To Henry Rathvon

    • Until 2006, the Atlantic Monthly regularly featured a cryptic crossword "puzzler" by Emily Cox and Henry Rathvon, which combines cryptic clues with diabolically ingenious variations on the construction of the puzzle itself. from Crossword

    • He and his partner, Emily Cox, wrote The Atlantic Puzzler, a cryptic crossword featured each month in the magazine The Atlantic Monthly from September 1977 to October 2009. from Henry Rathvon

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      Games (magazine) Games magazine (ISSN 0199-9788) is a United States magazine devoted to games and puzzles, and is published by Games…
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      Games magazine (ISSN 0199-9788) is a United States magazine devoted to games and puzzles, and is published by Games Publications, a division of Kappa Publishing Group.

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    How Crossword
    Connects To Games (magazine)

    • Every issue of GAMES Magazine contains a large crossword with a double clue list, under the title The World's Most Ornery Crossword; both lists are straight and arrive at the same solution, but one list is significantly more challenging than the other. from Crossword

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      Merv Griffin's Crosswords Merv Griffin's Crosswords (commonly shortened to Crosswords) is an American game show based on crossword puzzles…
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      Merv Griffin's Crosswords (commonly shortened to Crosswords) is an American game show based on crossword puzzles. The show was created by its namesake, Merv Griffin, who died shortly after beginning production on the series. Ty Treadway was the host, and Edd Hall was the announcer.…

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      Merv Griffin's Crosswords (commonly shortened to Crosswords) is an American game show based on crossword puzzles. The show was created by its namesake, Merv Griffin, who died shortly after beginning production on the series. Ty Treadway was the host, and Edd Hall was the announcer.
      The series ran in daily syndication from September 10, 2007 and aired first-run episodes until May 16, 2008. Reruns continued to air in some markets until September 4, 2009, and can now be seen on FamilyNet, ALN, and RTV.
      The show was produced by Yani-Brune Entertainment and Merv Griffin Entertainment, and was distributed by Program Partners.

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    Connects To Merv Griffin's Crosswords

    • Merv Griffin's Crosswords, a crossword-based game show that debuted in fall 2007. from Crossword

    • Merv Griffin's Crosswords (commonly shortened to Crosswords) is an American game show based on crossword puzzles. from Merv Griffin's Crosswords

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      Cross-figure A cross-figure (also variously called cross number puzzle or figure logic) is a puzzle similar to a crossword in…
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      A cross-figure (also variously called cross number puzzle or figure logic) is a puzzle similar to a crossword in structure, but with entries which consist of numbers rather than words, with individual digits being entered in the blank cells. The numbers can be clued in various ways:…

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      A cross-figure (also variously called cross number puzzle or figure logic) is a puzzle similar to a crossword in structure, but with entries which consist of numbers rather than words, with individual digits being entered in the blank cells. The numbers can be clued in various ways:
      Cross-figures which use mostly the first type of clue may be used for educational purposes, but most enthusiasts would agree that this clue type should be used rarely, if at all. Without this type a cross-figure may superficially seem to be impossible to solve, since no answer can apparently be filled in until another has first been found, which without the first type of clue appears impossible. However, if a different approach is adopted where, instead of trying to find complete answers (as would be done for a crossword) one gradually narrows down the possibilities for individual cells (or, in some cases, whole answers) then the problem becomes tractable. For example, if 12 across and 7 down both have three digits and the clue for 12 across is "7 down times 2", one can work out that (i) the last digit of 12 across must be even, (ii) the first digit of 7 down must be 1, 2, 3 or 4, and (iii) the first digit of 12 across must be between 2 and 9 inclusive. (It is an implicit rule of cross-figures that numbers cannot start with 0; however, some puzzles explicitly allow this) By continuing to apply this sort of argument, a solution can eventually be found. Another implicit rule of cross-figures is that no two answers should be the same (in cross-figures allowing numbers to start with 0, 0123 and 123 may be considered different.)
      A curious feature of cross-figures is that it makes perfect sense for the setter of a puzzle to try to solve it him or herself. Indeed, the setter should ideally do this (without direct reference to the answer) as it is essentially the only way to find out if the puzzle has a single unique solution. Alternatively, there are computer programs available that can be used for this purpose; however, they may not make it clear how difficult the puzzle is.
      Given that some basic mathematical knowledge is needed to solve cross-figures, they are much less popular than crosswords. As a result, very few books of them have ever been published. Dell Magazines publishes a magazine called Math Puzzles and Logic Problems six times a year which generally contains as many as a dozen of these puzzles, which they name "Figure Logics". A magazine called Figure it Out, which was dedicated to number puzzles, included some, but it was very short-lived. This also explains why cross-figures have fewer established conventions than crosswords (especially cryptic crosswords). One exception is the use of the semicolon (;) to attach two strings of numbers together, for example 1234;5678 becomes 12345678. Some cross-figures voluntarily ignore this option and other "non-mathematical" approaches (e.g. palindromic numbers and repunits) where same result can be achieved through algebraic means.

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    How Crossword
    Connects To Cross-figure

    • A crossnumber (also known as a cross-figure) is the numerical analogy of a crossword, in which the solutions to the clues are numbers instead of words. from Crossword

    • A cross-figure (also variously called cross number puzzle or figure logic) is a puzzle similar to a crossword in structure, but with entries which consist of numbers rather than words, with individual digits being entered in the blank cells. from Cross-figure

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      Anagram An anagram is a type of word play, the result of rearranging the letters of a word or phrase to produce a new word…
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      An anagram is a type of word play, the result of rearranging the letters of a word or phrase to produce a new word or phrase, using all the original letters exactly once; for example Torchwood can be rearranged into Doctor Who. Someone who creates anagrams may be called an "anagrammatist". The original word or phrase is known as the subject of the anagram. Anagrams are often used as a form of mnemonic device as well.…

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      An anagram is a type of word play, the result of rearranging the letters of a word or phrase to produce a new word or phrase, using all the original letters exactly once; for example Torchwood can be rearranged into Doctor Who. Someone who creates anagrams may be called an "anagrammatist". The original word or phrase is known as the subject of the anagram. Anagrams are often used as a form of mnemonic device as well.
      Any word or phrase that exactly reproduces the letters in another order is an anagram. However, the goal of serious or skilled anagrammatists is to produce anagrams that in some way reflect or comment on the subject. Such an anagram may be a synonym or antonym of its subject, a parody, a criticism, or praise; e.g. William Shakespeare = I am a weakish speller
      Another example is "silent" which can be rearranged to "listen". The two can be used in the phrase, "Think about it, SILENT and LISTEN are spelled with the same letters". (To mean "the quieter you become, the more you can hear").

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    Connects To Anagram

    • In Bananagrams, players place tiles from a pool into crossword-style word arrangements in a race to see who can finish the pool of tiles first. from Anagram

    • Cryptics often include anagrams, as well. from Crossword

    • Some clues may feature anagrams, and these are usually explicitly described as such. from Crossword

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    • Word puzzles, including anagrams, ciphers, crossword puzzles, and word search puzzles. from Puzzle

    • The mystery hunt employs a wide range of puzzles including crosswords, cryptic crosswords, logic puzzles, jigsaw puzzles, anagrams, connect-the-dots, ciphers, riddles, paint by numbers, sudokus, and word searches. from MIT Mystery Hunt

    • Butts decided to create a game that utilized both chance and skill by combining elements of anagrams and crossword puzzles, a popular pastime of the 1920s. from Alfred Mosher Butts

    • The young Brown spent hours working out anagrams and crossword puzzles, and he and his siblings participated in elaborate treasure hunts devised by their father on birthdays and holidays. from Dan Brown

    • These may consist of crossword puzzles, anagrams, Ditloids, Dingbats and basic mathematics problems. from Pub quiz

    • The Word Plus included a set of utilities that could help solve crossword puzzles or anagrams, insert soft hyphens, alphabetize word lists, and compute word frequencies. from Kaypro

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      Ambigram An ambigram is a word, art form or other symbolic representation, whose elements retain meaning when viewed or…
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      An ambigram is a word, art form or other symbolic representation, whose elements retain meaning when viewed or interpreted from a different direction, perspective, or orientation.…

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      An ambigram is a word, art form or other symbolic representation, whose elements retain meaning when viewed or interpreted from a different direction, perspective, or orientation.
      The meaning of the ambigram may either change, or remain the same, when viewed or interpreted from different perspectives.
      Douglas R. Hofstadter describes an ambigram as a "calligraphic design that manages to squeeze two different readings into the selfsame set of curves". Different ambigram artists (sometimes called ambigramists) may create completely different ambigrams from the same word or words, differing in both style and form.

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    Connects To Ambigram

    • Capitalization of answer letters is conventionally ignored; crossword puzzles are typically filled in, and their answer sheets are almost universally published in all caps, except in the rare cases of ambigrams. from Crossword

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      A. N. Prahlada Rao A. N. Prahlada Rao (born 24 July 1953) is an Indian author and Kannada-language crossword compiler.
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      A. N. Prahlada Rao (born 24 July 1953) is an Indian author and Kannada-language crossword compiler.

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    Connects To A. N. Prahlada Rao

    • A. N. Prahlada Rao, based in Bangalore, has composed some 40,000 crossword puzzles in the language Kannada, including 7,500 crosswords based on films made in Kannada, with a total of 1200,000 (Twelve lakhs) clues. from Crossword

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      Digraph (orthography) A digraph or digram (from the Greek: δίς dís, "double" and γράφω gráphō, "to write") is a pair of characters used…
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      A digraph or digram (from the Greek: δίς dís, "double" and γράφω gráphō, "to write") is a pair of characters used to write one phoneme (distinct sound) or a sequence of phonemes that does not correspond to the normal values of the two characters combined. The sound is often, but not necessarily, one which cannot…

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      A digraph or digram (from the Greek: δίς dís, "double" and γράφω gráphō, "to write") is a pair of characters used to write one phoneme (distinct sound) or a sequence of phonemes that does not correspond to the normal values of the two characters combined. The sound is often, but not necessarily, one which cannot be expressed using a single character in the orthography used by the language. Usually, the term "digraph" is reserved for graphemes whose pronunciation is always or nearly always the same.
      When digraphs do not represent a distinct phoneme, they may be relics from an earlier period of the language when they did have a different pronunciation, or represent a distinction which is made only in certain dialects, like wh in English. They may also be used for purely etymological reasons, like rh in English.
      In some language orthographies, like that of Serbian Latin or Croatian (lj, nj, dž), traditional Spanish (ch, ll), Hungarian (cs, dz, dzs, gy, ly, ny, sz, ty, zs) or Czech (ch), digraphs are considered individual letters, meaning that they have their own place in the alphabet, in the standard orthography, and cannot be separated into their constituent graphemes; e.g.: when sorting, abbreviating or hyphenating. In others, like English, this is not the case. In Dutch when the digraph 'ij' is capitalized, both letters are capitalized ('IJ').
      Some schemes of Romanization make extensive use of digraphs (e.g. BGN/PCGN romanization of Russian), while others rely solely on diacritics (e.g. ISO 9 romanization of Russian). To avoid ambiguity, transliteration based on diacritics is generally preferred in academic circles. Orthographic transcription systems follow rules of their target language (i.e. the language of the readers for whom the systems are intended), so they cannot use digraphs if the target language has none.

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    Connects To Digraph (orthography)

    • in Dutch crosswords, the ij digraph is considered one letter, filling one square, and the IJ and the Y (see Dutch alphabet) are considered distinct. from Crossword

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      Roger Squires Roger Squires, born 22 February 1932, in Tettenhall, Wolverhampton, England, is a British crossword compiler…
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      Roger Squires, born 22 February 1932, in Tettenhall, Wolverhampton, England, is a British crossword compiler, living in Ironbridge, Shropshire, who is best known for being the world's most prolific compiler. He compiles under the pseudonym Rufus in The Guardian, Dante in The Financial Times and is the Monday setter for the Daily Telegraph.

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    Connects To Roger Squires

    • According to Guinness World Records, May 15, 2007, the most prolific crossword compiler is Roger Squires of Ironbridge, Shropshire, UK. from Crossword

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      IJ (digraph) The IJ (lowercase ij; Dutch pronunciation: [ɛi] ( )) is the digraph of the letters i and j. Occurring in the Dutch…
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      The IJ (lowercase ij; Dutch pronunciation: [ɛi] ( )) is the digraph of the letters i and j. Occurring in the Dutch language, it is sometimes considered a ligature, or even a letter in itself – although in most fonts that have a separate character for ij the two composing parts are not connected, but are separate glyphs, sometimes slightly kerned.…

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      The IJ (lowercase ij; Dutch pronunciation: [ɛi] ( )) is the digraph of the letters i and j. Occurring in the Dutch language, it is sometimes considered a ligature, or even a letter in itself – although in most fonts that have a separate character for ij the two composing parts are not connected, but are separate glyphs, sometimes slightly kerned.
      An ij in written Dutch usually represents the diphthong [ɛi]. In standard Dutch, and most Dutch dialects, there are two possible spellings for the diphthong [ɛi]: ij and ei. This causes confusion for schoolchildren, who need to learn which words to write with ei and which with ij. To distinguish between the two, the ij is referred to as the lange ij ("long ij"), the ei as korte ei ("short ei") or simply E – I. In certain Dutch dialects (notably West Flemish and Zeelandic), as well as the Low German dialects of Dutch Low Saxon, a difference in the pronunciation of ei and ij is maintained. Whether pronounced identically to ei or not, the pronunciation of ij is often perceived difficult by people who do not have either sound in their native language. The tendency for native English speakers is to pronounce ij as [aɪ], (like the English vowel y) which can lead to confusion among native listeners.
      The ij originally represented a 'long i'. This can still be seen in the etymology of some words, and in the Dutch form of several foreign placenames: Berlin and Paris are spelled Berlijn and Parijs. Nowadays, the pronunciation follows the spelling, and they are pronounced with [ɛi]. The IJ is different from the letter Y. It used to be common, in particular when writing in capitals, to write Y instead of IJ. In fact this was the official spelling in the earlier part of the 19th century. That practice has now long been deprecated, but the standard Dutch pronunciation of the letter Y is ij when reading the alphabet. Also, in scientific disciplines such as mathematics and physics, the symbol y is usually pronounced ij. In Dutch, the letter Y only occurs in loanwords, proper names, or in (variantly spelled) old Dutch. Y is called Griekse IJ ("Greek Y"), I-grec (the latter from French, with the stress on grec), or Ypsilon. However, in the related language Afrikaans, the Y has replaced the IJ. Furthermore, the names of Dutch immigrants to the United States, Canada and Australia often were Anglicised, so that the IJ became a Y; for example, the surname Spijker often became Spyker.

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    How Crossword
    Connects To IJ (digraph)

    • in Dutch crosswords, the ij digraph is considered one letter, filling one square, and the IJ and the Y (see Dutch alphabet) are considered distinct. from Crossword

    • In crossword puzzles (except for Scrabble—see next paragraph), and in the game Lingo, IJ is considered one letter, filling one square, but the IJ and the Y are considered distinct. from IJ (digraph)

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      The Cross-Wits The Cross-Wits is an American syndicated game show which premiered on December 15, 1975 and lasted for five seasons…
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      The Cross-Wits is an American syndicated game show which premiered on December 15, 1975 and lasted for five seasons until its cancellation on September 12, 1980. The show was hosted by Jack Clark, with Jerri Fiala as hostess. Announcing duties were handled by John Harlan, Jay Stewart, and Jerry Bishop. The show was produced by Ralph Edwards Productions and distributed by Metromedia Producers Corporation.…

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      The Cross-Wits is an American syndicated game show which premiered on December 15, 1975 and lasted for five seasons until its cancellation on September 12, 1980. The show was hosted by Jack Clark, with Jerri Fiala as hostess. Announcing duties were handled by John Harlan, Jay Stewart, and Jerry Bishop. The show was produced by Ralph Edwards Productions and distributed by Metromedia Producers Corporation.
      A second version began airing on September 8, 1986, titled The All-New Crosswits, and was hosted by David Sparks with Michelle Roth as announcer. This version was produced by Crossedwits Productions in association with Outlet Communications, Inc., and distributed by ABR Entertainment.
      Both versions were produced as daily shows, although the original Cross-Wits aired in many markets as either a once- or twice-weekly series.

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    Connects To The Cross-Wits

    • The Cross-Wits, a crossword-based game show that ran in the 1970s and 1980s. from Crossword

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      New York World The New York World was a newspaper published in New York City from 1860 until 1931. The paper played a major role…
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      The New York World was a newspaper published in New York City from 1860 until 1931. The paper played a major role in the history of American newspapers. It was a leading national voice of the Democratic Party. From 1883 to 1911 under publisher Joseph Pulitzer, it became a pioneer in yellow journalism, capturing readers' attention and pushing its daily circulation to the one-million mark.

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    How Crossword
    Connects To New York World

    • On December 21, 1913, Arthur Wynne, a journalist from Liverpool, England, published a "word-cross" puzzle in the New York World that embodied most of the features of the genre as we know it. from Crossword

    • The paper published the first crossword puzzle in December 1913. from New York World

    • Crossword puzzles first appeared in the New York World in 1913, and soon became a popular feature in newspapers. from Simon & Schuster

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      Pangram A pangram (Greek: παν γράμμα, pan gramma, "every letter") or holoalphabetic sentence for a given alphabet is a…
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      A pangram (Greek: παν γράμμα, pan gramma, "every letter") or holoalphabetic sentence for a given alphabet is a sentence using every letter of the alphabet at least once. Pangrams have been used to display typefaces, test equipment, and develop skills in handwriting, calligraphy, and keyboarding.…

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      A pangram (Greek: παν γράμμα, pan gramma, "every letter") or holoalphabetic sentence for a given alphabet is a sentence using every letter of the alphabet at least once. Pangrams have been used to display typefaces, test equipment, and develop skills in handwriting, calligraphy, and keyboarding.
      The best known English pangram is "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog." It has been used since at least the late 19th century, was utilized by Western Union to test Telex / TWX data communication equipment for accuracy and reliability, and is now used by a number of computer programs (most notably the font viewer built into Microsoft Windows) to display computer fonts.
      An example in another language is the German Victor jagt zwölf Boxkämpfer quer über den großen Sylter Deich, containing all letters used in German, including every umlaut ( ä, ö, ü) plus the ß. It has been used since before 1800.
      List of pangrams has examples in many languages.
      Short pangrams in English are more difficult to come up with and tend to use uncommon words, because the English language uses some letters (especially vowels) much more frequently than others. Longer pangrams may afford more opportunity for humor, cleverness, or thoughtfulness. In a sense, the pangram is the opposite of the lipogram, in which the aim is to omit one or more letters. A perfect pangram contains every letter of the alphabet only once and can be considered an anagram of the alphabet; it is the shortest possible pangram. An example is the phrase "Cwm fjord bank glyphs vext quiz" (cwm, a loan word from Welsh, means a steep-sided valley, particularly in Wales).

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    Connects To Pangram

    • English-language cipher crosswords are nearly always pangrammatic (all letters of the alphabet appear in the solution). from Crossword

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      Acrostic An acrostic is a poem or other form of writing in which the first letter, syllable or word of each line, paragraph…
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      An acrostic is a poem or other form of writing in which the first letter, syllable or word of each line, paragraph or other recurring feature in the text spells out a word or a message. The word comes from the French acrostiche from post-classical Latin acrostichis, from Koine Greek ἀκροστιχίς, from Ancient Greek ἄκρος…

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      An acrostic is a poem or other form of writing in which the first letter, syllable or word of each line, paragraph or other recurring feature in the text spells out a word or a message. The word comes from the French acrostiche from post-classical Latin acrostichis, from Koine Greek ἀκροστιχίς, from Ancient Greek ἄκρος "highest, topmost" and στίχος "verse"). As a form of constrained writing, an acrostic can be used as a mnemonic device to aid memory retrieval. A famous acrostic was made in Greek for the acclamation JESUS CHRIST, SON OF GOD, SAVIOUR (Greek: Ιησούς Χριστός, Θεού Υιός, Σωτήρ; Iesous CHristos, THeou Yios, Soterch and th being each one letter in Greek). The initials spell ICHTHYS (ΙΧΘΥΣ), Greek for fish.

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    How Crossword
    Connects To Acrostic

    • An acrostic is a type of word puzzle, in eponymous acrostic form, that typically consists of two parts. from Crossword

    • An acrostic is a type of word puzzle, related somewhat to crossword puzzles, that uses an acrostic form. from Acrostic (puzzle)

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      Ll Ll/ll is a digraph which occurs in several natural languages.
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      Ll/ll is a digraph which occurs in several natural languages.

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    How Crossword
    Connects To Ll

    • in Spanish crosswords, the letters ch and ll fill two squares, although in some old crosswords (from prior to the 1996 spelling reform) they filled one square. from Crossword

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      Chessboard A chessboard is the type of checkerboard used in the board game chess, and consists of 64 squares (eight rows and…
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      A chessboard is the type of checkerboard used in the board game chess, and consists of 64 squares (eight rows and eight columns) arranged in two alternating colors (light and dark). The colors are called "black" and "white" (or "light" and "dark"), although the actual colors are usually dark green and buff for boards used…

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      A chessboard is the type of checkerboard used in the board game chess, and consists of 64 squares (eight rows and eight columns) arranged in two alternating colors (light and dark). The colors are called "black" and "white" (or "light" and "dark"), although the actual colors are usually dark green and buff for boards used in competition, and often natural shades of light and dark woods for home boards. Materials vary widely; while wooden boards are generally used in high-level games, vinyl and cardboard are common for low-level and informal play. Decorative glass and marble boards are available but not usually accepted for sanctioned games.
      The board is structurally similar to that used in English draughts (American checkers). Some low-cost sets (especially those sold in toy stores) may use red and black squares and include pieces for both games; though suitable for informal play, such boards are often not accepted for sanctioned play, depending on the local authority's rules on equipment standards.
      The board is always placed so that the rightmost square on the row nearest each player is a "white" square. The size of the board is usually chosen to be appropriate for the chess pieces used, and squares should be between 50mm and 65mm in size (2.0 to 2.5 inches). A square size approximately 1.25 to 1.3 times the size of the base of the king is preferred (the base of the king should be about 78% as wide as the size of the squares).
      In modern commentary, the columns (called files) are labeled by the letters a to h from left to right from the white player's point of view, and the rows (called ranks) by the numbers 1 to 8, with 1 being closest to the white player, thus providing a standard notation called algebraic chess notation.
      In older English commentary, the files are labeled by the piece originally occupying its first rank (e.g. queen, king's rook, queen's bishop), and ranks by the numbers 1 to 8 from each player's point of view, depending on the move being described. This is called descriptive chess notation and is no longer commonly used.

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    Connects To Chessboard

    • Rather than numbering the individual clues, the rows and columns are numbered as on a chessboard. from Crossword

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      Georges Perec Georges Perec (7 March 1936 – 3 March 1982) was a French novelist, filmmaker, documentalist and essayist. He was a…
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      Georges Perec (7 March 1936 – 3 March 1982) was a French novelist, filmmaker, documentalist and essayist. He was a member of the Oulipo group.

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    Connects To Georges Perec

    • Perec also created crossword puzzles for Le Point from 1976 on. from Georges Perec

    • A black-square usage of 10% is typical; Georges Perec compiled many 9×9 grids for Le Point with four or even three black squares. from Crossword

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      Pearson's Magazine Pearson's Magazine was an influential monthly periodical which first appeared in Britain in 1896. It specialised in…
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      Pearson's Magazine was an influential monthly periodical which first appeared in Britain in 1896. It specialised in speculative literature, political discussion, often of a socialist bent, and the arts. Its contributors included Upton Sinclair, George Bernard Shaw, Maxim Gorky, George Griffith, H. G. Wells, Dornford Yates and E. Phillips Oppenheim, many of whose short stories and novelettes first saw publication in Pearson's.…

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      Pearson's Magazine was an influential monthly periodical which first appeared in Britain in 1896. It specialised in speculative literature, political discussion, often of a socialist bent, and the arts. Its contributors included Upton Sinclair, George Bernard Shaw, Maxim Gorky, George Griffith, H. G. Wells, Dornford Yates and E. Phillips Oppenheim, many of whose short stories and novelettes first saw publication in Pearson's.
      It is also notable as the first British periodical to publish a crossword puzzle, in February 1922.

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    How Crossword
    Connects To Pearson's Magazine

    • The first crossword in Britain, according to Tony Augarde in his Oxford Guide to Word Games (1984), was in Pearson's Magazine for February 1922. from Crossword

    • It is also notable as the first British periodical to publish a crossword puzzle, in February 1922. from Pearson's Magazine

    1. 34
      Spoonerism A spoonerism is an error in speech or deliberate play on words in which corresponding consonants, vowels, or…
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      A spoonerism is an error in speech or deliberate play on words in which corresponding consonants, vowels, or morphemes are switched (see metathesis) between two words in a phrase.…

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      A spoonerism is an error in speech or deliberate play on words in which corresponding consonants, vowels, or morphemes are switched (see metathesis) between two words in a phrase.
      For example saying "The Lord is a shoving leopard" instead of "The Lord is a loving shepherd". While spoonerisms are commonly heard as slips of the tongue resulting from unintentionally getting one's words in a tangle, they can also be used intentionally as a play on words.

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    How Crossword
    Connects To Spoonerism

    • Numerous other types have been identified, including spoonerisms, poems, shifted letters, rhyming phrases, puns, homophones, and combinations of two or more of other types of themes. from Crossword

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      Ktiv hasar niqqud Ktiv hasar niqqud (Hebrew pronunciation: [ktiv ħaˈsaʁ niˈkud]; Hebrew: כתיב חסר ניקוד‎, literally "spelling lacking…
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      Ktiv hasar niqqud (Hebrew pronunciation: [ktiv ħaˈsaʁ niˈkud]; Hebrew: כתיב חסר ניקוד‎, literally "spelling lacking niqqud"), (colloquially known as ktiv male (IPA: [ktiv maˈle]; Hebrew: כתיב מלא‎), literally "full spelling") are the rules for writing Hebrew without vowel pointers (niqqud), often replacing them with matres lectionis (ו and י). To avoid confusion, consonantal ו ([v])…

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      Ktiv hasar niqqud (Hebrew pronunciation: [ktiv ħaˈsaʁ niˈkud]; Hebrew: כתיב חסר ניקוד‎, literally "spelling lacking niqqud"), (colloquially known as ktiv male (IPA: [ktiv maˈle]; Hebrew: כתיב מלא‎), literally "full spelling") are the rules for writing Hebrew without vowel pointers (niqqud), often replacing them with matres lectionis (ו and י). To avoid confusion, consonantal ו ([v]) and י ([j]) are doubled in the middle of words. In general use, niqqud are seldom used, except in specialized texts such as dictionaries, poetry, or texts for children or for new immigrants.

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    How Crossword
    Connects To Ktiv hasar niqqud

    • This can lead to ambiguities in the entry of some words, and compilers generally specify that answers are to be entered in ktiv male (with some vowels) or ktiv haser (without vowels). from Crossword

    1. 36
      Lattice graph A lattice graph, mesh graph, or grid graph, is a graph whose drawing, embedded in some Euclidean space…
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      A lattice graph, mesh graph, or grid graph, is a graph whose drawing, embedded in some Euclidean space Rn, forms a regular tiling. This implies that the group of bijective transformations that send the graph to itself is a lattice in the group-theoretical sense.…

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      A lattice graph, mesh graph, or grid graph, is a graph whose drawing, embedded in some Euclidean space Rn, forms a regular tiling. This implies that the group of bijective transformations that send the graph to itself is a lattice in the group-theoretical sense.
      Typically, no clear distinction is made between such a graph in the more abstract sense of graph theory, and its drawing in space (often the plane or 3D space). This type of graph may more shortly be called just a lattice, mesh, or grid. Moreover, these terms are also commonly used for a finite section of the infinite graph, as in "an 8×8 square grid".
      The term lattice graph has also been given in the literature to various other kinds of graphs with some regular structure, such as the Cartesian product of a number of complete graphs.

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    How Crossword
    Connects To Lattice graph

    • A crossword is a word puzzle that normally takes the form of a square or a rectangular grid of white and black shaded squares. from Crossword

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      Lateral thinking Lateral thinking is solving problems through an indirect and creative approach, using reasoning that is not…
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      Lateral thinking is solving problems through an indirect and creative approach, using reasoning that is not immediately obvious and involving ideas that may not be obtainable by using only traditional step-by-step logic. The term was coined in 1967 by Edward de Bono.…

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      Lateral thinking is solving problems through an indirect and creative approach, using reasoning that is not immediately obvious and involving ideas that may not be obtainable by using only traditional step-by-step logic. The term was coined in 1967 by Edward de Bono.
      According to de Bono, lateral thinking deliberately distances itself from standard perceptions of creativity as either "vertical" logic (the classic method for problem solving: working out the solution step-by-step from the given data) or "horizontal" imagination (having a thousand ideas but being unconcerned with the detailed implementation of them).

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    How Crossword
    Connects To Lateral thinking

    • Many puzzles feature clues involving wordplay which are to be taken metaphorically or in some sense other than their literal meaning, requiring some form of lateral thinking. Depending on the puzzle creator or the editor, this might be represented either with a question mark at the end of the clue or with a modifier such as "maybe" or "perhaps". from Crossword

    1. 38
      Yōon Yōon or Youon (拗音?, contracted word or diphthong) is a feature of the Japanese language in which a mora…
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      Yōon or Youon (拗音?, contracted word or diphthong) is a feature of the Japanese language in which a mora is formed with an added [j] sound, i.e., palatalized.…

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      Yōon or Youon (拗音?, contracted word or diphthong) is a feature of the Japanese language in which a mora is formed with an added [j] sound, i.e., palatalized.
      Yōon are represented in hiragana using a kana ending in i, such as き (ki), plus a smaller-than-usual version of one of the three y kana, ya, yu or yo. For example kyō, "today", is written きょう, using a small version of the yo kana, よ. Contrast this with kiyō, "skillful", which is written きよう, with a full-sized yo kana. In the past, in historical kana usage, yōon were not distinguished with the smaller kana, and had to be determined by context.
      In earlier Japanese, yōon could also be formed with the kana wa, wi, we, and wo; for example, くゎ/クヮ kwa, く/ク kwi, く/ク kwe, く/ク kwo. Although obsolete in modern Japanese, kwa and kwi can still be found in several of the Ryukyuan languages today, while kwe is formed with the digraph くぇ. Instead of the kana き, these are formed with the kana for ku, く/ク.

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    How Crossword
    Connects To Yōon

    • Any second Yōon character is treated as a full syllable and is rarely written with a smaller character. from Crossword

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      Le Point Le Point (French pronunciation: ​[ləˈpwɛ̃]) is a French weekly news magazine. It was founded in 1972 by a group of…
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      Le Point (French pronunciation: ​[ləˈpwɛ̃]) is a French weekly news magazine. It was founded in 1972 by a group of journalists who had, one year earlier, left the editorial team of L'Express, which was then owned by Jean-Jacques Servan-Schreiber, a député (member of parliament) of the Parti Radical. The company operating the newspaper, Société d'exploitation de l'hebdomadaire Le Point (SEBDO Le Point) has its head office in the 14th arrondissement of Paris.…

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      Le Point (French pronunciation: ​[ləˈpwɛ̃]) is a French weekly news magazine. It was founded in 1972 by a group of journalists who had, one year earlier, left the editorial team of L'Express, which was then owned by Jean-Jacques Servan-Schreiber, a député (member of parliament) of the Parti Radical. The company operating the newspaper, Société d'exploitation de l'hebdomadaire Le Point (SEBDO Le Point) has its head office in the 14th arrondissement of Paris.
      The editorial team of spring 1972 found financial backing with group Hachette and was then directed by Claude Imbert. Other journalists making up the team were: Jacques Duquesne, Henri Trinchet, Pierre Billard, Robert Franc, Georges Suffert. Management included Olivier Chevrillon, Pdg and Philippe Ramond.
      The weekly magazine recruited journalists from the Parisian press and relied on its ability to redefine the genre. It modelled itself closely on magazines owned by News Magazine: Time Magazine and Newsweek. After a fairly difficult start in September 1972, the magazine quickly challenged L'Express. It has changed ownership several times: from Gaumont, and Alcatel it is currently owned by Artémis, a French investment group founded and owned by the billionaire businessman François Pinault.

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    How Crossword
    Connects To Le Point

    • A black-square usage of 10% is typical; Georges Perec compiled many 9×9 grids for Le Point with four or even three black squares. from Crossword

    • Perec also created crossword puzzles for Le Point from 1976 on. from Georges Perec

    1. 40
      Cabin fever Cabin fever is an idiomatic term, first recorded in 1918, for a claustrophobic reaction that takes place when a…
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      Cabin fever is an idiomatic term, first recorded in 1918, for a claustrophobic reaction that takes place when a person or group is isolated and/or shut in a small space, with nothing to do for an extended period. Cabin fever describes the extreme irritability and restlessness a person may feel in these situations.…

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      Cabin fever is an idiomatic term, first recorded in 1918, for a claustrophobic reaction that takes place when a person or group is isolated and/or shut in a small space, with nothing to do for an extended period. Cabin fever describes the extreme irritability and restlessness a person may feel in these situations.
      A person may experience cabin fever in a situation such as being in a simple country vacation cottage. When experiencing cabin fever, a person may tend to sleep, have distrust of anyone they are with, and an urge to go outside even in the rain, snow, dark or hail. The phrase is also used humorously to indicate simple boredom from being home alone.

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    How Crossword
    Connects To Cabin fever

    • An example of a multiple-letter addition (and one that does not occur at the end of the entry) might be "Crazy about kitchen storage?" = CABINET FEVER (derived from "cabin fever"). from Crossword

    1. 41
      Germanic umlaut Germanic umlaut (also i-umlaut or i-mutation) is a type of linguistic umlaut in which a back vowel changes to the…
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      Germanic umlaut (also i-umlaut or i-mutation) is a type of linguistic umlaut in which a back vowel changes to the associated front vowel or a front vowel becomes closer to /i/ when the following syllable contains /i/, /iː/, or /j/. This process took place separately in the various Germanic languages starting around 450 or 500 AD, and affected all of the early languages except for Gothic. An example of the resulting vowel change is the English plural foot > feet.…

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      Germanic umlaut (also i-umlaut or i-mutation) is a type of linguistic umlaut in which a back vowel changes to the associated front vowel or a front vowel becomes closer to /i/ when the following syllable contains /i/, /iː/, or /j/. This process took place separately in the various Germanic languages starting around 450 or 500 AD, and affected all of the early languages except for Gothic. An example of the resulting vowel change is the English plural foot > feet.
      Germanic umlaut should be clearly distinguished from other historical vowel phenomena that operated in the history of the Germanic languages such as Germanic a-mutation and the various language-specific processes of u-mutation, as well as the earlier Indo-European ablaut (vowel gradation), which is observable in the declension of Germanic strong verbs such as sing/sang/sung.

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    How Crossword
    Connects To Germanic umlaut

    • However, the umlauts Ä, Ö and Ü must not be replaced by AE, OE or UE when playing (as would usually be done in German crosswords where ß is also replaced by SS). from Scrabble letter distributions

    1. 42
      Cipher In cryptography, a cipher (or cypher) is an algorithm for performing encryption or decryption—a series of…
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      In cryptography, a cipher (or cypher) is an algorithm for performing encryption or decryption—a series of well-defined steps that can be followed as a procedure. An alternative, less common term is encipherment. To encipher or encode is to convert information from plain text into cipher or code. In non-technical usage, a 'cipher' is the same thing as a 'code'; however, the concepts are distinct in cryptography. In classical cryptography, ciphers were distinguished from codes.…

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      In cryptography, a cipher (or cypher) is an algorithm for performing encryption or decryption—a series of well-defined steps that can be followed as a procedure. An alternative, less common term is encipherment. To encipher or encode is to convert information from plain text into cipher or code. In non-technical usage, a 'cipher' is the same thing as a 'code'; however, the concepts are distinct in cryptography. In classical cryptography, ciphers were distinguished from codes.
      Codes generally substitute different length strings of characters in the output, while ciphers generally substitute the same number of characters as are input. There are exceptions and some cipher systems may use slightly more, or fewer, characters when output versus the number that were input.
      Codes operated by substituting according to a large codebook which linked a random string of characters or numbers to a word or phrase. For example, "UQJHSE" could be the code for "Proceed to the following coordinates". When using a cipher the original information is known as plaintext, and the encrypted form as ciphertext. The ciphertext message contains all the information of the plaintext message, but is not in a format readable by a human or computer without the proper mechanism to decrypt it.
      The operation of a cipher usually depends on a piece of auxiliary information, called a key (or, in traditional NSA parlance, a cryptovariable). The encrypting procedure is varied depending on the key, which changes the detailed operation of the algorithm. A key must be selected before using a cipher to encrypt a message. Without knowledge of the key, it should be extremely difficult, if not impossible, to decrypt the resulting ciphertext into readable plaintext.
      Most modern ciphers can be categorized in several ways

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    How Crossword
    Connects To Cipher

    • The objective, as any other crossword, is to determine the proper letter for each cell; in a cipher crossword, the 26 numbers serve as a cipher for those letters: cells that share matching numbers are filled with matching letters, and no two numbers stand for the same letter. from Crossword

    • Word puzzles, including anagrams, ciphers, crossword puzzles, and word search puzzles. from Puzzle

    • The mystery hunt employs a wide range of puzzles including crosswords, cryptic crosswords, logic puzzles, jigsaw puzzles, anagrams, connect-the-dots, ciphers, riddles, paint by numbers, sudokus, and word searches. from MIT Mystery Hunt

    1. 43
      Homophone A homophone is a word that is pronounced the same as another word but differs in meaning, and may differ in…
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      A homophone is a word that is pronounced the same as another word but differs in meaning, and may differ in spelling. The words may be spelled the same, such as rose (flower) and rose (past tense of "rise"), or differently, such as carat, caret, and carrot, or to, two, and too. Homophones that are…

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      A homophone is a word that is pronounced the same as another word but differs in meaning, and may differ in spelling. The words may be spelled the same, such as rose (flower) and rose (past tense of "rise"), or differently, such as carat, caret, and carrot, or to, two, and too. Homophones that are spelled the same are also both homographs and homonyms. Homophones that are spelled differently are also called heterographs. The term "homophone" may also apply to units longer or shorter than words, such as phrases, letters or groups of letters that are pronounced the same as another phrase, letter or group of letters.
      The word derives from the Greek homo- (ὁμο-), "same", and phōnḗ (φωνή), "voice, utterance".

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    How Crossword
    Connects To Homophone

    • The solver must guess that "we hear" indicates a homophone, and so a homophone of a synonym of "A few" ("some") is the answer. from Crossword

    • Another type of wordplay used in cryptics is the use of homophones. from Crossword

    • Homophones are often used to create puns and to deceive the reader (as in crossword puzzles) or to suggest multiple meanings. from Homophone

    1. 44
      Capitalization Capitalization (or capitalisation) is writing a word with its first letter as a capital letter (upper-case letter)…
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      Capitalization (or capitalisation) is writing a word with its first letter as a capital letter (upper-case letter) and the remaining letters in lower case in writing systems with a case distinction. The term is also used for the choice of case in text.…

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      Capitalization (or capitalisation) is writing a word with its first letter as a capital letter (upper-case letter) and the remaining letters in lower case in writing systems with a case distinction. The term is also used for the choice of case in text.
      Conventional writing systems (orthographies) for different languages have different conventions for capitalization.
      The systematic use of capitalized and uncapitalized words in running text is called "mixed case". Conventions for the capitalization of titles and other classes of words vary between languages and, to a lesser extent, between different style guides.
      In some written languages, it is not obvious what is meant by the "first letter": for example, the South-Slavic digraph 'lj' is considered as a single character for collation purposes (a situation which occurs in many other languages) and can be represented by a single Unicode character, but at the start of a word it is written 'Lj': only the L is capitalized. In contrast, in Dutch, when a word starts with the digraph 'ij', capitalization is applied to both letters, such as in the name of the city of IJmuiden. There is a single Unicode character that combines the two letters, but it is generally not used.

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    Connects To Capitalization

    • This ensures a proper name can have its initial capital letter checked with a non-capitalizable letter in the intersecting clue. from Crossword

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      Bonnier Group Bonnier AB (also the Bonnier Group ) is a privately held Swedish media group of 175 companies operating in 16…
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      Bonnier AB (also the Bonnier Group ) is a privately held Swedish media group of 175 companies operating in 16 countries. It is controlled by the Bonnier family.

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    Connects To Bonnier Group

    • The oldest extant crossword magazine published in Swedish is Krysset (from Bonnier), founded in 1957. from Crossword

    • Bonnier Tidskrifter publishes magazines, including Veckans Affärer, Damernas Värld, Amelia, Sköna Hem, Teknikens Värld, Resume, nearly a dozen crossword magazines, and the tablet magazine C Mode. from Bonnier Group

    1. 46
      Tilde The tilde (/ˈtɪldə/, /ˈtɪldi/; ˜ or ~; also referred to informally as squiggly or squiggle(s)) is a grapheme with…
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      The tilde (/ˈtɪldə/, /ˈtɪldi/; ˜ or ~; also referred to informally as squiggly or squiggle(s)) is a grapheme with several uses. The name of the character comes from Portuguese and Spanish, from the Latin titulus meaning "title" or "superscription", though the term "tilde" has evolved and now has a different meaning in linguistics. Some may refer to it as a "flourish".…

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      The tilde (/ˈtɪldə/, /ˈtɪldi/; ˜ or ~; also referred to informally as squiggly or squiggle(s)) is a grapheme with several uses. The name of the character comes from Portuguese and Spanish, from the Latin titulus meaning "title" or "superscription", though the term "tilde" has evolved and now has a different meaning in linguistics. Some may refer to it as a "flourish".
      It was originally written over a letter as a scribal abbreviation, as a "mark of suspension", shown as a straight line when used with capitals. Thus the commonly used words Anno Domini were frequently abbreviated to Ao Dñi an elevated terminal with a suspension mark placed above the "n". Such mark could denote the omission of one letter or several letters. This saved on the expense of the scribe's labour and the cost of vellum and ink. Mediaeval European charters written in Latin are largely made up of such abbreviated words with suspension marks; only uncommon words given in full. It has since acquired a number of other uses as a diacritic mark or a character in its own right. These are encoded in Unicode at U+0303 ◌̃ combining tilde and U+007E ~ tilde (as a spacing character), and there are additional similar characters for different roles. In lexicography, the latter kind of tilde and the swung dash (⁓) are used in dictionaries to indicate the omission of the entry word.

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    Connects To Tilde

    • in French, in Spanish and in Italian, accent marks and most other diacritical markings are ignored, except the tilde in Spanish: for instance, in French, the final E of answer ÊTRE can double as the final É of CONGÉ when written ETRE and CONGE; but in Spanish, N and Ñ are distinct letters. from Crossword

    1. 47
      Diacritic A diacritic /daɪ.əˈkrɪtɨk/ – also diacritical mark, diacritical point, or diacritical sign – is a glyph added to a…
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      A diacritic /daɪ.əˈkrɪtɨk/ – also diacritical mark, diacritical point, or diacritical sign – is a glyph added to a letter, or basic glyph. The term derives from the Greek διακριτικός (diakritikós, "distinguishing", from ancient Greek διά (diá, through) and κρίνω (krínein, to separate)). Diacritic is primarily an adjective, though sometimes used as a noun, whereas…

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      A diacritic /daɪ.əˈkrɪtɨk/ – also diacritical mark, diacritical point, or diacritical sign – is a glyph added to a letter, or basic glyph. The term derives from the Greek διακριτικός (diakritikós, "distinguishing", from ancient Greek διά (diá, through) and κρίνω (krínein, to separate)). Diacritic is primarily an adjective, though sometimes used as a noun, whereas diacritical is only ever an adjective. Some diacritical marks, such as the acute ( ´ ) and grave ( ` ), are often called accents. Diacritical marks may appear above or below a letter, or in some other position such as within the letter or between two letters.
      The main use of diacritical marks in the Latin script is to change the sound-values of the letters to which they are added. Examples from English are the diaereses in naïve and Noël, which show that the vowel with the diaeresis mark is pronounced separately from the preceding vowel; the acute and grave accents, which can indicate that a final vowel is to be pronounced, as in saké and poetic breathèd; and the cedilla under the "c" in the borrowed French word façade, which shows it is pronounced /s/ rather than /k/. In other Latin alphabets, they may distinguish between homonyms, such as the French ("there") versus la ("the"), which are both pronounced [la]. In Gaelic type, a dot over a consonant indicates lenition of the consonant in question.
      In other alphabetic systems, diacritical marks may perform other functions. Vowel pointing systems, namely the Arabic harakat ( ـَ, ـُ, ـُ, etc.) and the Hebrew niqqud ( ַ, ֶ, ִ, ֹ , ֻ, etc.) systems, indicate sounds (vowels and tones) that are not conveyed by the basic alphabet. The Indic virama ( ् etc.) and the Arabic sukūn ( ـْـ ) mark the absence of a vowel. Cantillation marks indicate prosody. Other uses include the Early Cyrillic titlo ( ◌҃ ) and the Hebrew gershayim ( ״ ), which, respectively, mark abbreviations or acronyms, and Greek diacritical marks, which showed that letters of the alphabet were being used as numerals. In the Hanyu Pinyin official romanization system for Chinese, diacritics are used to mark the tones of the syllables in which the marked vowels occur.
      In orthography and collation, a letter modified by a diacritic may be treated either as a new, distinct letter or as a letter–diacritic combination. This varies from language to language, and may vary from case to case within a language.
      In some cases, letters are used as "in-line diacritics" in place of ancillary glyphs, because they modify the sound of the letter preceding them, as in the case of the "h" in English "sh" and "th".

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    Connects To Diacritic

    • Diacritical markings in foreign loanwords (or foreign-language words appearing in English-language puzzles) are ignored for similar reasons. from Crossword

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      Dutch orthography Dutch orthography uses the Latin alphabet according to a system which has evolved to suit the needs of the Dutch…
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      Dutch orthography uses the Latin alphabet according to a system which has evolved to suit the needs of the Dutch language. The spelling system is issued by government decree and is compulsory for all government documentation and educational establishments.

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    Connects To Dutch orthography

    • in Dutch crosswords, the ij digraph is considered one letter, filling one square, and the IJ and the Y (see Dutch alphabet) are considered distinct. from Crossword

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      Ch (digraph) Ch is a digraph in the Latin script. It is treated as a letter of its own in Chamorro, Czech, Slovak, Igbo…
    1. 49

      Ch is a digraph in the Latin script. It is treated as a letter of its own in Chamorro, Czech, Slovak, Igbo, Quechua, Guarani, Welsh, Cornish, Breton and Belarusian Łacinka alphabets. In Vietnamese and Spanish, it also used to be considered a letter for collation purposes but this is no longer common.

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    Connects To Ch (digraph)

    • in Czech and Slovak, diacritics are respected and ch, being considered one letter, occupies one square. from Crossword

    • in Spanish crosswords, the letters ch and ll fill two squares, although in some old crosswords (from prior to the 1996 spelling reform) they filled one square. from Crossword

    1. 50
      Windsock A windsock is a conical textile tube (which resembles a giant sock, hence its name) designed to indicate wind…
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      A windsock is a conical textile tube (which resembles a giant sock, hence its name) designed to indicate wind direction and relative wind speed. Windsocks typically are used at airports and at chemical plants where there is risk of gaseous leakage. They are sometimes located alongside highways at windy locations.…

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      A windsock is a conical textile tube (which resembles a giant sock, hence its name) designed to indicate wind direction and relative wind speed. Windsocks typically are used at airports and at chemical plants where there is risk of gaseous leakage. They are sometimes located alongside highways at windy locations.
      Wind direction is the opposite of the direction in which the windsock is pointing (note that wind directions are conventionally specified as being the compass point from which the wind originates; so a windsock pointing due north indicates a southerly wind). Windspeed is indicated by the windsock's angle relative to the mounting pole; in low winds, the windsock droops; in high winds it flies horizontally.
      Per FAA standards referenced below, a 15-knot (28 km/h; 17 mph) wind will fully extend the properly functioning windsock. A 3-knot (5.6 km/h; 3.5 mph) breeze will cause the properly functioning windsock to orient itself according to the wind.
      Per Transport Canada Standards: a 15kn wind will fully extend the Wind Sock, a 10kt wind will cause the wind sock to be 5° below the horizontal, a 6kt wind will cause the wind sock to be 30° below the horizontal.
      At many airports, windsocks are lighted at night, either by flood lights on top surrounding it or with one mounted on the pole shining inside it.
      Windsocks are also popular with children and can have bright and colourful designs. These windsocks are not particularly functional and mostly for decoration, however they can be used as a basic guide to wind direction and speed.

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    How Crossword
    Connects To Windsock

    • A clue could also consist of objects that point a direction, e.g., "vane dir." or "windsock dir.". from Crossword

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