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Dipsomania is a historical term describing a medical condition involving an uncontrollable craving for alcohol. In the 19th century, dipsomania was a variety of alcohol-related problems, most of which are known today as alcoholism. Dipsomania is occasionally still used to describe a particular condition of periodic, compulsive bouts of alcohol intake. The idea of dipsomania is important for its historical role in promoting a disease theory of chronic drunkenness. The word comes from Greek dipso ("δίψα"= thirst) and mania. It is still mentioned in the WHO ICD10 as an alternative description for alcohol dependence syndrome, episodic use F10.26

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      Surender Mohan Pathak Surender Mohan Pathak (Hindi: सुरेन्द्र मोहन पाठक, Punjabi: ਸੁਰਿੰਦਰ ਮੋਹਨ ਪਾਠਕ) (born 19 February 1940 at Khemkaran…
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      Surender Mohan Pathak (Hindi: सुरेन्द्र मोहन पाठक, Punjabi: ਸੁਰਿੰਦਰ ਮੋਹਨ ਪਾਠਕ) (born 19 February 1940 at Khemkaran, Amritsar, Punjab) is an author of Hindi-language crime fiction with nearly 300 novels to his credit. His writing career, along with his full-time job in Indian Telephone Industries, Delhi, began in the early 1960s with his Hindi translations of Ian Fleming’s James Bond novels and the works of James Hadley Chase. He also wrote his own James Bond series.…

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      Surender Mohan Pathak (Hindi: सुरेन्द्र मोहन पाठक, Punjabi: ਸੁਰਿੰਦਰ ਮੋਹਨ ਪਾਠਕ) (born 19 February 1940 at Khemkaran, Amritsar, Punjab) is an author of Hindi-language crime fiction with nearly 300 novels to his credit. His writing career, along with his full-time job in Indian Telephone Industries, Delhi, began in the early 1960s with his Hindi translations of Ian Fleming’s James Bond novels and the works of James Hadley Chase. He also wrote his own James Bond series.
      His first short story, 57 saal puraana aadmi (५७ साल पुराना आदमी, The Man Age 57), was published by मनोहर कहानीयां in 1959; his first full length novel, Operation Budapest, came out in 1969.
      His major work began with what is called the "Sunil" series (सुनील-सीरीज़) which consists of at least 115 novels. Sunil, a debonair and upright investigative journalist for the fictional daily newspaper Blast, lives in the fictional city of Rajnagar, a metropolitan city located on the coastline. Sunil has a quixotic nature when it comes to damsels in distress, which happens only too often. He is a man in his 30s, who is willing to go any lengths in pursuit of justice, mostly with help of his best friend Ramakant Malhotra, a dipsomaniac and owner of a club called Youth Club. His attempts to protect the innocent often result in Sunil ending up on the wrong side of the law, bringing him face to face with Inspector Prabhudayal, the exceptionally strict and incorruptible officer in charge of the homicide division of the Rajnagar Police.
      The "philosopher" detective Sudhir Kumar Kohli is the protagonist of Pathak's Sudhir Series, all narrated in the first person. Sudhir is the diametric opposite of Sunil, proudly proclaiming himself dilli ka khaas kism ka haraami who frequently enlists the help of Inspector Devender Kumar Yadav, who can easily be persuaded to do something dishonest. A recent novel of this (in)famous series has been translated by Giriraj Sharan (uncredited) and published by Diamond Books under the title The Last Goal.
      However the best-known series of novels of Pathak is Vimal (विमल), a.k.a. Sardar Surender Singh Sohal (सरदार सुरेन्द्र सिंह सोहल), a.k.a. another dozen names he uses to camouflage his identity in the Mumbai underworld. Vimal is a Robinhood like character, who is constantly on the run from the law due to circumstances out of his control. He has taken up arms against gangsters like Rajbahadur Bakhia and, after killing him, his next avatar Iqbal Singh and then Vyaas Shankar Gajre. The Sardar has associates like Tukaram and his henchmen, like Wagle and Irfan, etc. Vimal is not a private detective or police inspector but a criminal wanted in seven states.
      In addition, Pathak has also authored several novels not belonging to any specific series, which are labelled as 'thriller' novels irrespective of their storyline. Many collections of joke books compiled by Pathak have also been published. Several authors have been known to plagiarise or "borrow" heavily from his works.

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    How Dipsomania
    Connects To Surender Mohan Pathak

    • He is a man in his 30s, who is willing to go any lengths in pursuit of justice, mostly with help of his best friend Ramakant Malhotra, a dipsomaniac and owner of a club called Youth Club. from Surender Mohan Pathak

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      Christoph Wilhelm Hufeland Christoph Wilhelm Friedrich Hufeland (12 August 1762, Langensalza – 25 August 1836, Berlin) was a German physician…
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      Christoph Wilhelm Friedrich Hufeland (12 August 1762, Langensalza – 25 August 1836, Berlin) was a German physician. He is famous as the most eminent practical physician of his time in Germany and as the author of numerous works displaying extensive reading and a cultivated critical faculty.

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    How Dipsomania
    Connects To Christoph Wilhelm Hufeland

    • Historically the name "dipsomania" was coined by German physician Dr. C. W. Hufeland in 1819 before it was superseded by "alcoholism". from Alcoholism

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      Chemical law Chemical laws are those laws of nature relevant to chemistry. The most fundamental concept in chemistry is the law…
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      Chemical laws are those laws of nature relevant to chemistry. The most fundamental concept in chemistry is the law of conservation of mass, which states that there is no detectable change in the quantity of matter during an ordinary chemical reaction. Modern physics shows that it is actually energy that is conserved, and that energy…

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      Chemical laws are those laws of nature relevant to chemistry. The most fundamental concept in chemistry is the law of conservation of mass, which states that there is no detectable change in the quantity of matter during an ordinary chemical reaction. Modern physics shows that it is actually energy that is conserved, and that energy and mass are related; a concept which becomes important in nuclear chemistry. Conservation of energy leads to the important concepts of equilibrium, thermodynamics, and kinetics.
      Additional laws of chemistry elaborate on the law of conservation of mass. Joseph Proust's law of definite composition says that pure chemicals are composed of elements in a definite formulation; we now know that the structural arrangement of these elements is also important.
      Dalton's law of multiple proportions says that these chemicals will present themselves in proportions that are small whole numbers (i.e. 1:2 O:H in water); although in many systems (notably biomacromolecules and minerals) the ratios tend to require large numbers, and are frequently represented as a fraction. Such compounds are known as non-stoichiometric compounds
      More modern laws of chemistry define the relationship between energy and transformations.

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    How Dipsomania
    Connects To Chemical law

    • Brühl-Cramer classified dipsomania in terms of continuous, remittent, intermittent, periodic and mixed forms, and in his book he discussed its etiology, pathogenesis, sequelae, and treatment options, all influenced by prevailing ideas about the laws of chemistry and concepts of excitability. from Dipsomania

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      Sequela A sequela (UK /sɨˈkwiːlə/, US /sɨˈkwɛlə/; usually used in the plural, sequelae) is a pathological condition…
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      A sequela (UK /sɨˈkwlə/, US /sɨˈkwɛlə/; usually used in the plural, sequelae) is a pathological condition resulting from a disease, injury, therapy, or other trauma. Typically, a sequela is, in medical language, a chronic condition that is a complication of an acute condition that begins during that acute condition. In ordinary language it may be…

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      A sequela (UK /sɨˈkwlə/, US /sɨˈkwɛlə/; usually used in the plural, sequelae) is a pathological condition resulting from a disease, injury, therapy, or other trauma. Typically, a sequela is, in medical language, a chronic condition that is a complication of an acute condition that begins during that acute condition. In ordinary language it may be described as a further condition that is different from, but a consequence of, the first condition. In timing a sequela contrasts with a late effect, where there is a period, sometimes as long as several decades, between the resolution of the initial condition and the appearance of the late effect.

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    How Dipsomania
    Connects To Sequela

    • Brühl-Cramer classified dipsomania in terms of continuous, remittent, intermittent, periodic and mixed forms, and in his book he discussed its etiology, pathogenesis, sequelae, and treatment options, all influenced by prevailing ideas about the laws of chemistry and concepts of excitability. from Dipsomania

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      Flight (2012 film) Flight is a 2012 American drama film directed by Robert Zemeckis. The film stars Denzel Washington as Whip…
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      Flight is a 2012 American drama film directed by Robert Zemeckis. The film stars Denzel Washington as Whip Whitaker, an airline pilot who miraculously crash-lands his plane after it suffers an in-flight mechanical failure, saving nearly everyone on board. Immediately following the crash, he is hailed a hero, but an investigation soon leads to questions that put the captain in a different light.…

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      Flight is a 2012 American drama film directed by Robert Zemeckis. The film stars Denzel Washington as Whip Whitaker, an airline pilot who miraculously crash-lands his plane after it suffers an in-flight mechanical failure, saving nearly everyone on board. Immediately following the crash, he is hailed a hero, but an investigation soon leads to questions that put the captain in a different light.
      Flight was the first live-action film directed by Robert Zemeckis since Cast Away and What Lies Beneath, both released in 2000, and his first R-rated film since Used Cars in 1980. The cast also includes Don Cheadle, Kelly Reilly, John Goodman and Bruce Greenwood. It was the second collaboration of Washington and Goodman, who had previously worked together in the 1998 film Fallen. It was also a box office success, grossing over $160 million worldwide and received mostly positive reviews. The film was nominated twice at the 85th Academy Awards, for Best Actor (Denzel Washington) and Best Original Screenplay (John Gatins).

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    How Dipsomania
    Connects To Flight (2012 film)

    • Whip Whitaker, in the 2012 film Flight, is a dipsomaniac airline pilot who flies by instinct, even when drunk. from Dipsomania

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      Etiology Etiology (/iːtiˈɒlədʒi/; alternatively aetiology or ætiology) is the study of causation, or origination. The word…
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      Etiology (/tiˈɒləi/; alternatively aetiology or ætiology) is the study of causation, or origination. The word is derived from the Greek αἰτιολογία, aitiologia, "giving a reason for" (αἰτία, aitia, "cause"; and -λογία, -logia). The word is most commonly used in medical and philosophical theories, where it is used to refer to the study of…

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      Etiology (/tiˈɒləi/; alternatively aetiology or ætiology) is the study of causation, or origination. The word is derived from the Greek αἰτιολογία, aitiologia, "giving a reason for" (αἰτία, aitia, "cause"; and -λογία, -logia). The word is most commonly used in medical and philosophical theories, where it is used to refer to the study of why things occur, or even the reasons behind the way that things act, and is used in philosophy, physics, psychology, government, geography, spatial analysis, medicine, theology, and biology in reference to the causes of various phenomena. An etiological myth is a myth intended to explain a name or create a mythic history for a place or family.

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    How Dipsomania
    Connects To Etiology

    • Brühl-Cramer classified dipsomania in terms of continuous, remittent, intermittent, periodic and mixed forms, and in his book he discussed its etiology, pathogenesis, sequelae, and treatment options, all influenced by prevailing ideas about the laws of chemistry and concepts of excitability. from Dipsomania

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      Alcoholism Alcoholism, also known as alcohol use disorder (AUD) and alcohol dependence syndrome, is a broad term for any…
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      Alcoholism, also known as alcohol use disorder (AUD) and alcohol dependence syndrome, is a broad term for any drinking of alcohol that results in problems. It was previously divided into two types: alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence. In a medical context alcoholism is said to exist when two or more of the following is present:…

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      Alcoholism, also known as alcohol use disorder (AUD) and alcohol dependence syndrome, is a broad term for any drinking of alcohol that results in problems. It was previously divided into two types: alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence. In a medical context alcoholism is said to exist when two or more of the following is present: a person drinks large amounts over a long time period, has difficulty cutting down, acquiring and drinking alcohol takes up a great deal of time, alcohol is strongly desired, usage results in not fulfilling responsibilities, usage results in social problems, usage results in health problem, usage results in risky situations, withdrawal occurs when stopping, and alcohol tolerance has occurred to use. Alcohol use can affect all parts of the body but particularly affects the brain, heart, liver, pancreas, and immune system. This can result in mental illness, Wernicke Korsakoff syndrome, an irregular heart beat, liver failure, and an increase the risk of cancer, among other disease. Drinking during pregnancy can cause damage to the baby resulting in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. Generally women are more sensitive to alcohol's harmful physical and mental effects than men.
      Both environmental factors and genetics are involved in causing alcoholism with about half the risk attributed to each. A person with a parent or sibling with alcoholism are three to four times more likely to be alcoholic themselves. Environmental factors include social, cultural, and behavioral influences. High stress levels, anxiety, as well as inexpensive easily accessible alcohol increases risk. People may continue to drink partly to prevent or improve symptoms of withdrawal. A low level of withdrawal may last for months following stopping. Medically alcoholism is considered both a physical and mental illness. Both questionnaires and certain blood tests may detect people with possible alcoholism. Further information is then collected to confirm the diagnosis.
      Prevention of alcoholism is possible by regulating and limiting the sale of alcohol, taxing alcohol to increase its cost, and providing inexpensive treatment. Treatment may take several steps. Because of the medical problems that can occur during withdrawal, alcohol detoxification should be carefully controlled. One common method involves the use of benzodiazepine medications, such as diazepam. This can be either given well admitted to a health care institution or occasionally while a person remains in the community with close supervision. Other addictions or mental illness may complicate treatment. After detoxification support such as group therapy or support groups are used to help keep a person from returning to drinking. One commonly used form of support is the group Alcoholics Anonymous. The medications acamprosate, disulfiram, or naltrexone may also be used to help prevent further drinking.
      The World Health Organization estimates that as of 2010 there were 208 million people with alcoholism worldwide (4.1% of the population over 15 years of age). In the United States about 17 million (7%) of adults and 0.7 million (2.8%) of those age 12 to 17 years of age are affected. It is more common among males and young adults, becoming less common in middle and old age. It is the least common in Africa at 1.1% and has the highest rates in Eastern Europe at 11%. Alcoholism directly resulted in 139,000 deaths in 2013 up from 112,000 deaths in 1990. A total of 3.3 million deaths (5.9% of all deaths) are believed to be due to alcohol. It often reduces a person's life expectancy by around ten years. In the United States it resulted in economic costs of $224 billion USD in 2006. Many terms, some insulting and others informal, have been used to refer to people affected by alcoholism including: tippler, drunkard, dipsomaniac, and souse. In 1979, the World Health Organization discouraged the use of "alcoholism" due to it inexact meaning, preferring "alcohol dependence syndrome".

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    How Dipsomania
    Connects To Alcoholism

    • Historically the name "dipsomania" was coined by German physician Dr. C. W. Hufeland in 1819 before it was superseded by "alcoholism". from Alcoholism

    • Many terms, some insulting and others informal, have been used to refer to people affected by alcoholism including: tippler, drunkard, dipsomaniac, and souse. from Alcoholism

    • In the 19th century, dipsomania was a variety of alcohol-related problems, most of which are known today as alcoholism. from Dipsomania

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    • Moule appears to have suffered from depression and alcoholism, and his life and death were shaped by these character traits; one of his pupils recorded in his diary that Horace was 'a dipsomaniac-and that he was suffering from D.T'. from Horatio Mosley Moule

    • An etymologically related term is dipsomaniac, meaning an alcoholic. from Polydipsia

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      Pathogenesis The pathogenesis of a disease is the biological mechanism (or mechanisms) that lead to the diseased state. The term…
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      The pathogenesis of a disease is the biological mechanism (or mechanisms) that lead to the diseased state. The term can also describe the origin and development of the disease, and whether it is acute, chronic, or recurrent. The word comes from the Greek pathos ("disease") and genesis ("creation").…

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      The pathogenesis of a disease is the biological mechanism (or mechanisms) that lead to the diseased state. The term can also describe the origin and development of the disease, and whether it is acute, chronic, or recurrent. The word comes from the Greek pathos ("disease") and genesis ("creation").
      Types of pathogenesis include microbial infection, inflammation, malignancy and tissue breakdown. For example bacterial pathogenesis is the mechanism by which bacteria cause infectious illness.
      Most diseases are caused by multiple processes. For example, certain cancers arise from dysfunction of the immune system (skin tumors and lymphoma after a renal transplant, which requires immunosuppression).
      The pathogenic mechanisms of a disease (or condition) are set in motion by underlying etiological causes, which if controlled would allow the disease to be prevented. Often, a potential etiology is identified by epidemiological observations before a pathological link can be drawn between the cause and the disease. The pathological perspective can be directly integrated into an epidemiological approach in the interdisciplinary field of molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE). MPE can help to assess pathogenesis and causality by means of linking a potential etiologic factor to molecular pathologic signatures of a disease. Thus, the MPE paradigm can advance the area of causal inference.

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    How Dipsomania
    Connects To Pathogenesis

    • Brühl-Cramer classified dipsomania in terms of continuous, remittent, intermittent, periodic and mixed forms, and in his book he discussed its etiology, pathogenesis, sequelae, and treatment options, all influenced by prevailing ideas about the laws of chemistry and concepts of excitability. from Dipsomania

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      Alcoholic beverage An alcoholic beverage is a drink which contains a substantial amount of the psychoactive drug ethanol (informally…
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      An alcoholic beverage is a drink which contains a substantial amount of the psychoactive drug ethanol (informally called alcohol). Drinking alcohol plays an important social role in most cultures. Alcohol has potential for abuse and physical dependence.…

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      An alcoholic beverage is a drink which contains a substantial amount of the psychoactive drug ethanol (informally called alcohol). Drinking alcohol plays an important social role in most cultures. Alcohol has potential for abuse and physical dependence.
      Almost all countries have laws regulating their production, sale, and consumption, and some countries ban such activities entirely. However, alcoholic beverages are legal in most parts of the world. The global alcoholic beverages industry exceeded $1 trillion in 2014.
      It is one of the most widely used recreational drugs in the world. In the United States 89% of adults have drunk alcohol at some point in time, 70% have drunk in the last year and 56% in the last month. Alcoholic beverages are typically divided into three classes—beers, wines, and spirits—and typically contain between 3% and 40% alcohol by volume.
      Discovery of late Stone Age jugs suggest that intentionally fermented beverages existed at least as early as the Neolithic period (cir. 10,000 BC). Many nonhuman animals also consume alcohol when given the opportunity and are affected in much the same way as humans, although humans are the only species known to produce alcoholic beverages intentionally.

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    How Dipsomania
    Connects To Alcoholic beverage

    • Dipsomania is a historical term describing a medical condition involving an uncontrollable craving for alcohol. from Dipsomania

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